Things I Have Built

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
Hi utchs81. It is all mortise and tenon. All mortises were hand cut with a chisel (I have a mortising machine, but the bit would not handle the maple) There are two hidden screws through the back and into the arms which I plugged with walnut. Also, the rockers have mortises that fit into tenons on the legs, but to make it easier to move they are not glued on but fitted with screws. So 6 screws total. All of the rest are glue joints.
I do a bit of wood working (not to your level) and can appreciate the amount of skill and effort it took to create this - awesome job!
 

CountryBoyBob454

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2010
Messages
395
Likes
338
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
C78D1B33-8A72-4F45-BA5F-DC54EFBEB4C4.jpeg
 

VolNExile

Unencumbered by the thought process
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
23,882
Likes
43,987
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
View attachment 394097
All I can say is WOW!
 

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
View attachment 394097
You sir have mad skills! Congrats on another awesome project.

P.S. more detailed pictures please
 
Last edited:

CountryBoyBob454

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2010
Messages
395
Likes
338
Thanks Walkenvol, but honestly I don’t think it is a matter of skil as it is a little know how and a lot of patience. I used cockbeading around the drawer front. This dresses it up a bit and allows adjustments if the fit isn’t perfect, but it also covers up most of the dovetails. The casework is held together with half blind dovetails. I will take credit for cutting pretty good dovetails, but for months I didn’t do anything but practice making them. There was a great article on the net from Popular Woodworking that detailed how to make the divided light door. The trick there is a set of router bits specifically for that purpose. The finish is a mahogany dye and a sprayed on and padded shellac. I think I included a picture of the bare wood. If I could do one thing over with I would have tried to get the lock centered in the door (left to right). Still not exactly sure how to go about this. I think I needed to find the center of the door member and ordered a lock according.
 

Attachments

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
Your modesty is admirable, but I’ve built a few pieces of furniture and restored a few others that needed serious repairs. Your skills are pretty elite, definitely several notches above mine. I would have never even considered dovetails on anything beyond the drawer. You should consider a YouTube channel for your projects.

Here’s a walnut coffe table I’m currently working on for our cabin I’ve been restoring for the past 1.5 years 294B80CD-600B-4553-BB72-95A4B09D7579.jpeg
This was my wife’s great grandmother’s who passed in the 1890’s. Was painted white and so rickety it wouldn’t support anything. Disassembled, Scrapped off all the old paint & finish and rebuilt several of the leg joints.

A6FEAFAA-47D5-444A-902D-D08B834AB5BF.jpeg
 
Last edited:

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
Yesterday’s project was making legs for the base of the walnut table I posted earlier. I’m not equipped for much metal working as the extent of my tools are a 25 yo mig welder, a handheld Milwaukee bandsaw, and a 4 1/2” grinder. Steel is crazy expensive around here so I always use scraps. This was from a cable reel and not painted yet. Still grinding on the other end
59CA5564-D80E-4593-AB93-8D0E405EAB28.jpeg [
 
Last edited:

larjoranj

I CAN'T RE MEMBER
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
1,352
Likes
4,597
This is a zombie groundbreaker. It moves. Hopefully I can upload the gif. I made the structure out of pvc and used a wiper motor to get the movement. Added an old shirt and put a zombie mask on a styrofoam head. I'll add some fake blood before Halloween and pile up some mulch around the base to make it look like the zombie is pushing up from his grave.
 

Carl Pickens

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
39,223
Likes
47,792
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
View attachment 394097
Nicely done!
 

Carl Pickens

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
39,223
Likes
47,792
Built this Charleston Triple Chest in African Mahogany over the summer. This is my first project that used ogee feet and sliding dovetails. The casework is all half blind dovetails. Best I can count this project has 244 hand cut dovetails. The finish is dye, thin coat of boiled linseed oil and padded shellac.
You’re quite the craftsman… awesome
 

AurantiacoFan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
384
Likes
685
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
View attachment 394097

You are talented. Do you build for others? More directly, are you interested in building some custom gun cabinets?
 

golfballs

Mostly Peaceful Poster
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
75,380
Likes
57,644
I needed to replace a Walmart bookcase and found a picture of a case built in the 1790s that I liked. I built this using African mahogany and old style glass that is wavy and bubbly. The casework is constructed with hand cut dovetails. The size of this pushed my small work space to the limit. Glad to have this finished! I can now get the lawnmower out without moving things around.
View attachment 394097
🤯
 

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
Here’s the top to the kitchen island. Wild cherry log I had sawn. Started out just over 2” thick before planning / sanding and is 6’ long. Still trying to decide on the legs / base. Wanting to keep it somewhat open underneath as opposed to storage space. Maybe incorporate this 2’ turnbuckle in the stretcher between the end legs? Any suggestions? This is for the same cabin.

P.s. anyone know if local black walnut and black cherry are related. Obviously the coloring is different but the character / graining of the wood is somewhat similar. Both are rot resistant. DDD2CC7A-65E2-435F-9FC6-49C5635EF999.jpeg 03B1BB9A-19F5-46E7-AA74-FBC6C609C2EF.jpeg
 

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
9,846
Likes
13,471
Thanks! I haven’t built for other people. Maybe some day if I get a better shop.I am working out of a corner my basement and am power tool challenged. I am too slow to consider doing this as a business.
I’ve found since I thought I had enough money to retire, I’ve lost any interest in working for money. I like to work / build things but not for pay, only for ours or family/friends. Maybe I’m strange that way?
D9A0D99A-5411-4568-B0F7-D87A0ED72F29.jpeg

If a person wanted to do custom wood work for pay, I’d suggest building doors. I made the interior doors for our cabin out of red oak and reclaimed redwood then pegged the mortise and tenons with walnut dowels. Finished with a few coats of polyurethane, not really that much too it and was way less labor than many of my other projects which get far less interest. Seems like about half the folks who come inside our place ask if I’d build similar for them so I’d guess a pretty good profit could be made there.
 

VN Store




Top