The Grill and BBQ thread

n_huffhines

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Well it looks yummy. I generally smoke at about 225 and never let it go above 250. Did you sauce it before wraping it in foil?
No, that's not how Franklin did it. I sprayed it every once in a while (maybe I overdid it?) with apple cider vinegar in the hours leading up to the foil wrap. Here is the recipe I'm referencing:

 

JCHateSteve

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No, that's not how Franklin did it. I sprayed it every once in a while (maybe I overdid it?) with apple cider vinegar in the hours leading up to the foil wrap. Here is the recipe I'm referencing:

Huh, that's a diffrent method than I'm used to. I doubt the vinegar would do that. My guess is the outside just got over done. I would either drop the temp your cooking at, or try to introduce more moisture when you wrap it. I do that by adding sauce.
 

n_huffhines

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Huh, that's a diffrent method than I'm used to. I doubt the vinegar would do that. My guess is the outside just got over done. I would either drop the temp your cooking at, or try to introduce more moisture when you wrap it. I do that by adding sauce.
I had tons of juices at the bottom of my foil and he didn't seem to have any. What's the deal with that?
 

volmanbill

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No, that's not how Franklin did it. I sprayed it every once in a while (maybe I overdid it?) with apple cider vinegar in the hours leading up to the foil wrap. Here is the recipe I'm referencing:

Maybe it was the spray. I've always done mine at 225 and never spray them. With fat side up, I haven't found it necessary. Though I have injected a few times.
 

JCHateSteve

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No and yes. Rub sat on it about 15 minutes is all
I had to look it up, vinegar can turn meat tough. It usually does the opposite. But it can happen if you overdue it. My guess is the vinegar, salt in the rub, and higher temp of this method pulled all the moisture out of the outer layer. Going easier on the vinegar or omitting the salt in the rub might fix it.
 

NEVolFan

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The inside was fantastic but the outside was rubbery and didn't shred apart well. What'd I do wrong? I followed Franklin's method: smoke at 275 for 5 hours, wrap in tin foil and finish.

View attachment 226854 View attachment 226855
Looks good inside... maybe too much spritzing. Some good articles out there about the effects of spritizing, and some think we tend to get carried away with that process... me as well. I mix apple juice and apple cider vinegar as my spritz and for ribs I hit em every 30 mins. I may need to dial that back as well.

Maybe you ought to try to let the crust form and then light spray only (limited frequency).

"The first responsibility of any meat is to be like me: Crusty on the outside, tender on the inside."Meathead
 
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kiddiedoc

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Looks good inside... maybe too much spritzing. Some good articles out there about the effects of spritizing, and some think we tend to get carried away with that process... me as well. I mix apple juice and apple cider vinegar as my spritz and for ribs I hit em every 30 mins. I may need to dial that back as well.

Maybe you ought to try to let the crust form and then light spray only (limited frequency).

"The first responsibility of any meat is to be like me: Crusty on the outside, tender on the inside."Meathead
I add a little liquid to my 2 hour roasting pan, but I prefer to not spritz at all when ribs are cooking uncovered. I find you get a much better bark. Once I take them out for the finishing 45-60 min, I like to hit them with a little more dry rub, but that's it.
 

volmanbill

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goldenvol

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Go aeiou

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I like lightly smokey flavor but not really intense smoke flavor. Good looking salmon though.
If using a tradition smoker some of the smoke flavor can be controlled by the wood you use. I prefer peach or apple. Any very mild wood. Use much more lump charcoal than wood. You might even prefer no wood. Chips/chunks?

I don't have a traeger so I cannot comment about it.
 
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Yep, I use one all the time.
What's the longest smoke you've done on it?

I have a Masterbuilt electric that I rarely use and presents some storage problems (keep indoors). I'm considering getting rid of it and moving to the kettle with SnS as my smoking option. Mostly I do short stuff already with pellet tubes like chicken, wings, ribs. Would like to do the occasional butt and possibly try a brisket if that's doable with that set up.
 

JCHateSteve

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What's the longest smoke you've done on it?

I have a Masterbuilt electric that I rarely use and presents some storage problems (keep indoors). I'm considering getting rid of it and moving to the kettle with SnS as my smoking option. Mostly I do short stuff already with pellet tubes like chicken, wings, ribs. Would like to do the occasional butt and possibly try a brisket if that's doable with that set up.
The longest I have done is about 10 hours. After that you would probably need to refill it. Which isn't an issue. You just push the remaining coals to one side and put in more charcoal/wood. I use it for most smokes these days. I have a pit barrel for capacity, but rarely use it anymore. The kettle is a little small for a large Turkey or whole packer brisket. You can do a brisket flat or point though. You can do multiple racks of ribs with a rib rack, it's a bit of a pain to rotate then though. I do 1 or 2 racks of ribs on the normal grate. If you want an all in one option I think it's the best short of a high dollar Kamodo, like a Kamodo Joe. For the record, You can achieve the same results in a kettle without a slow and sear. But the SNS just makes everything more convenient. I think they are a little pricey, to be honest, but I'd never let go of mine. Using charcoal is more work than an electric, but the results are way better IMO.
 
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