Wanya 3rd time in quarantine

#51

Remy

A kick to the cods is my only deterrence.
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#51
So step back a minute and consider what you're saying.

In particular, pay attention to four key facts:

(a) these lads are being tested for covid-19 three times a week. Every two days, more or less. They know if they've gotten it very quickly, much more quickly than you and I.
(b) the hazard only lasts about two weeks. That's how long a young, healthy person who has covid-19 is a hazard to pass it on to others.
(c) most college kids go home 2-4 times a year. Thanksgiving maybe, Christmas/New Years, spring break maybe, and summer. Football players usually do not go home at Thanksgiving (mid-season). So the next opportunity most of our lads have to get home to family members is not for another three months or so. But even for those few who live locally and could go home any given weekend,...
(d) our lads have brains. They're capable of thinking through the risks they may pose to a parent, grandparent, or other loved one. They also have hearts. They'll care enough to avoid contact with those loved ones if they think there's a chance they may be carrying the virus.

Put those four facts together, and you'll see that the risk of the lads passing covid-19 on to a vulnerable family member is actually very low. I certainly wouldn't rearrange their lives around it. Instead, I would let them manage it themselves.

Let's don't mouth-breathe over this, and let's do give our players credit for being intelligent, thoughtful human beings.

We really don't need this severe level of control over them. We're over-doing it. Purely to assuage the heavy mouth-breathing of those alarmists (and political opportunists) who happen to hold key political offices or positions in college administrations...so we can play football.


p.s. Contrast the level of control our universities are exerting over our players with the level of control they exercise over the rest of the student body. Thrice-weekly testing? Oh no, I think probably no testing at all unless the student goes to the health center and asks for one, or unless contact tracing points them out. Controlling when they get home? As far as I know, not at all. I'm sure the university is reminding all students to be careful and thoughtful with visits home, but their schedules are much more open than the football players at this time of year. It is striking, once you think about it. No, all this extra effort isn't to protect grandma. The effort is to satisfy nega-covid19s (i just invented that term, heh) like the governors of North Carolina and Michigan so that the lads can play football (hasn't worked yet--yet--with the Michigan one).
When you bring reason and critical thinking to the table concerning this subject which you did in the above, it's usually followed by a deluge of emotion and hysterics of "what about the kids?????" People are about hystericed out over this virus and it is waaaaaay overdue IMO.
 
#52

WBO

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#52
When you bring reason and critical thinking to the table concerning this subject which you did in the above, it's usually followed by a deluge of emotion and hysterics of "what about the kids?????" People are about hystericed out over this virus and it is waaaaaay overdue IMO.
"Hystericed?" Where did you get that one at?

OK so you still deny the seriousness of the pandemic. Got that. Anyone who believes in the seriousness of this is a hysterical, emotional fear-monger. Got that. Positions you agree with are based on reason and critical thinking and people you disagree with are mouth-breathers. Got that.

These young men are physically blessed, hard-working, team oriented individuals. But let's not also deny the basic nature of 18-19 year old males. They still sometimes do stupid things for no reason. Exhibit 1 would be the young people at spring break this year and at frat parties this fall.
 
#54

VFL-82-JP

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#54
"Hystericed?" Where did you get that one at?

OK so you still deny the seriousness of the pandemic. Got that. Anyone who believes in the seriousness of this is a hysterical, emotional fear-monger. Got that. Positions you agree with are based on reason and critical thinking and people you disagree with are mouth-breathers. Got that.

These young men are physically blessed, hard-working, team oriented individuals. But let's not also deny the basic nature of 18-19 year old males. They still sometimes do stupid things for no reason. Exhibit 1 would be the young people at spring break this year and at frat parties this fall.
WBO, I agree with you that the nature of 18-19 year olds is to sometimes (okay, often) do dumb stuff. Heh. We've all been there.

But I think you're wrong about a couple of things.

First, that they do those dumb things for "no reason." Of course they have a reason. And it usually has a lot to do with (a) trying to get laid, or (b) having fun with friends. Those are good and valid reasons. Even if they don't lead to a degree, a job, or a humanitarian award. They're still reasons. And not bad ones.

Second, I disagree (with caveat) that these young folks going to parties is--or should be--a big deal. It shouldn't be. Them getting covid-19 also shouldn't be a big deal. It certainly shouldn't be the life-and-death kind of deal that some play it up to be. Because they'll get it, they'll often not even know they got it, if they do know they'll have minor symptoms like loss of ability to taste food for a couple of days, maybe a headache or two, and then they'll feel better. They won't have any lasting effects. And, joy of joy, they'll have immunity for (research thus far indicates) at least 4 months, maybe longer. Which means at least the rest of the football season.

What's not to like in that other than the headache?

Now, the caveat. Because a lot of people ARE making a much bigger deal of this than they should, and some of those people are in positions of power when it comes to college football--like state governors, school presidents, and the like--because of them, you are right that we DO have to treat a player being exposed to covid-19 as a big deal. We shouldn't have to, but we do. So for that reason alone, I agree with you that the lads should tone down the socializing while the season is running.

We probably agree on that much, at least.

Go Vols!
 
#55

im4num3

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#55
COVID at worst has taken people who were already on their way out sooner with some tragedies here and there with younger people who are obese or other severe comorbidities.

The faster though, you can spread this virus through say....a college campus where the current rate of hospitalization is at ZERO, you can create a herd immunity so you can SAVE LIVES.

See Sweden.
Sweden?
 
#57

willinhf

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#57
Where are you getting this information, because Universities don't normally release that information because of HIPPA, you know. Even if that is true, the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
Schools can release positive test numbers. The states do it every day. Now they cannot publicize who had positive tests, just their numbers. PHI vs. epidemiology.
 
#58

GoVols1961

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#58
Where are you getting this information, because Universities don't normally release that information because of HIPPA, you know. Even if that is true, the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
"HIPAA" not "HIPPA".
 
#59

VOLINVONORE

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#59
WBO, I agree with you that the nature of 18-19 year olds is to sometimes (okay, often) do dumb stuff. Heh. We've all been there.

But I think you're wrong about a couple of things.

First, that they do those dumb things for "no reason." Of course they have a reason. And it usually has a lot to do with (a) trying to get laid, or (b) having fun with friends. Those are good and valid reasons. Even if they don't lead to a degree, a job, or a humanitarian award. They're still reasons. And not bad ones.

Second, I disagree (with caveat) that these young folks going to parties is--or should be--a big deal. It shouldn't be. Them getting covid-19 also shouldn't be a big deal. It certainly shouldn't be the life-and-death kind of deal that some play it up to be. Because they'll get it, they'll often not even know they got it, if they do know they'll have minor symptoms like loss of ability to taste food for a couple of days, maybe a headache or two, and then they'll feel better. They won't have any lasting effects. And, joy of joy, they'll have immunity for (research thus far indicates) at least 4 months, maybe longer. Which means at least the rest of the football season.

What's not to like in that other than the headache?

Now, the caveat. Because a lot of people ARE making a much bigger deal of this than they should, and some of those people are in positions of power when it comes to college football--like state governors, school presidents, and the like--because of them, you are right that we DO have to treat a player being exposed to covid-19 as a big deal. We shouldn't have to, but we do. So for that reason alone, I agree with you that the lads should tone down the socializing while the season is running.

We probably agree on that much, at least.

Go Vols!
You still have no idea what the virus is doing or how it is spread. Time to trust the epidemiology of this disease. It may save your life and the life of someone near to you. Viruses don't care about an individual. It seeks everyone who dos not respect it. Better to be safe than beome ill and/or spread it to someone else who is of higher risk of sever adverse events or death.
 
#60

Remy

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#60
You still have no idea what the virus is doing or how it is spread. Time to trust the epidemiology of this disease. It may save your life and the life of someone near to you. Viruses don't care about an individual. It seeks everyone who dos not respect it. Better to be safe than beome ill and/or spread it to someone else who is of higher risk of sever adverse events or death.
We've seen this sort of nonsense and hysterical pomposity not only on VN but in the media in general. The statement, "It seeks everyone who does not respect it." ascribes an intellect to a virus seeking YOU because it's smart like a stalking lion in the bush. This sort of nonsense is designed to drive nonthinking herd animals to hiding under their beds with their knees clacking. Live your lives, take precautions but get out there and do what you need to do whether it's raise hell in protest or vote for a candidate.
 
#61

papatomany

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#61
COVID at worst has taken people who were already on their way out sooner with some tragedies here and there with younger people who are obese or other severe comorbidities.

The faster though, you can spread this virus through say....a college campus where the current rate of hospitalization is at ZERO, you can create a herd immunity so you can SAVE LIVES.

See Sweden.
Well, I have several "comorbidities" myself -- heart disease, a-fib, diabetes. hypertension -- but with proper treatment I should have another 10 to 15 years; whereas with Covid AND my comorbidities I may have a month. My situation is way more common than the old lady in the nursing home losing the last 6 months of her life. So, unless you're going with the old "we're all going to die eventually", then, no, it's not primarily "people who were already on their way out."
 
#62

VFL-82-JP

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#62
Well, I have several "comorbidities" myself -- heart disease, a-fib, diabetes. hypertension -- but with proper treatment I should have another 10 to 15 years; whereas with Covid AND my comorbidities I may have a month. My situation is way more common than the old lady in the nursing home losing the last 6 months of her life. So, unless you're going with the old "we're all going to die eventually", then, no, it's not primarily "people who were already on their way out."
Papa, your situation probably is more common. That is, there are more Americans aged 35-65 with some degree of heart disease, high blood pressure, perhaps weight issues, maybe diabetes, but still doing okay and who could reasonably expect to live decades longer ... than there are 75-90 year olds in nursing homes with the same kinds of co-morbidities and more who have a life expectancy of a year or less. True. You're right. More of the former than the latter.

But when you zoom in on the people actually dying of Covid-19, the 75-90 year olds in nursing homes or struggling along at home with help, they race past your age cohort into the lead.

I would not have phrased it as PlanetVolunteer did, but he's right that a significant percentage of the folks who have died of Covid-19 are those whose life expectancy was already pretty short before they ever caught that virus. A very significant percentage of Covid-19 deaths are among people who would probably have died within the following year or so anyway. Just too many different problems dragging them down, eventually the body can't keep pushing uphill. And covid-19 can, and often has been, the straw that broke the camel's back for those folks.

That's all he meant to say, I think. He was just callous and a bit heartless in HOW he said it.
 
#63

VOLINVONORE

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#63
We've seen this sort of nonsense and hysterical pomposity not only on VN but in the media in general. The statement, "It seeks everyone who does not respect it." ascribes an intellect to a virus seeking YOU because it's smart like a stalking lion in the bush. This sort of nonsense is designed to drive nonthinking herd animals to hiding under their beds with their knees clacking. Live your lives, take precautions but get out there and do what you need to do whether it's raise hell in protest or vote for a candidate.
Such a childish reply. The virus, when present, well take every advantage you give it to infect you. That is why the medical community and other educated scientists recommend the wearing masks, washing your hands frequently, avoiding large gathering of people, etc. Over 6 million U. S, citizens have been reported having the disease and about 200,000 Of them have died. Because of the problems in testing, actual number of cases are likely more than 5 times that number. Because of attitudes against the recommendation, 4 % of the World‘s population has over 20% reported cases and deaths. So, when you refuse to ignore the recommendations, you and the others are more likely to become the reason why this disease will continue to cause the pandemic to continue. You do what you think is best for our society and live with the results. This is my opinion which is based on epidemiological and scientific data.
 
#64

PlanetVolunteer

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#64
Well, I have several "comorbidities" myself -- heart disease, a-fib, diabetes. hypertension -- but with proper treatment I should have another 10 to 15 years; whereas with Covid AND my comorbidities I may have a month. My situation is way more common than the old lady in the nursing home losing the last 6 months of her life. So, unless you're going with the old "we're all going to die eventually", then, no, it's not primarily "people who were already on their way out."
Yes it was. By far most of the deaths are people in nursing homes and ages 80 plus.
 
#65

PlanetVolunteer

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#65
Papa, your situation probably is more common. That is, there are more Americans aged 35-65 with some degree of heart disease, high blood pressure, perhaps weight issues, maybe diabetes, but still doing okay and who could reasonably expect to live decades longer ... than there are 75-90 year olds in nursing homes with the same kinds of co-morbidities and more who have a life expectancy of a year or less. True. You're right. More of the former than the latter.

But when you zoom in on the people actually dying of Covid-19, the 75-90 year olds in nursing homes or struggling along at home with help, they race past your age cohort into the lead.

I would not have phrased it as PlanetVolunteer did, but he's right that a significant percentage of the folks who have died of Covid-19 are those whose life expectancy was already pretty short before they ever caught that virus. A very significant percentage of Covid-19 deaths are among people who would probably have died within the following year or so anyway. Just too many different problems dragging them down, eventually the body can't keep pushing uphill. And covid-19 can, and often has been, the straw that broke the camel's back for those folks.

That's all he meant to say, I think. He was just callous and a bit heartless in HOW he said it.
Yeah I didn't feel like getting specific.
 
#66

papatomany

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#66
Papa, your situation probably is more common. That is, there are more Americans aged 35-65 with some degree of heart disease, high blood pressure, perhaps weight issues, maybe diabetes, but still doing okay and who could reasonably expect to live decades longer ... than there are 75-90 year olds in nursing homes with the same kinds of co-morbidities and more who have a life expectancy of a year or less. True. You're right. More of the former than the latter.

But when you zoom in on the people actually dying of Covid-19, the 75-90 year olds in nursing homes or struggling along at home with help, they race past your age cohort into the lead.

I would not have phrased it as PlanetVolunteer did, but he's right that a significant percentage of the folks who have died of Covid-19 are those whose life expectancy was already pretty short before they ever caught that virus. A very significant percentage of Covid-19 deaths are among people who would probably have died within the following year or so anyway. Just too many different problems dragging them down, eventually the body can't keep pushing uphill. And covid-19 can, and often has been, the straw that broke the camel's back for those folks.

That's all he meant to say, I think. He was just callous and a bit heartless in HOW he said it.
Not at all concerned with how callous and heartless the statement may have been. He basically said there are two groups: People whose lives are already essentially over and a precious few outliers. The actual statement was: "COVID at worst has taken people who were already on their way out sooner with some tragedies here and there with younger people who are obese or other severe comorbidities." Which is wrong. Also, 35-65 isn't an age group. When I was 35, even after my first heart attack (and only 20 lbs overweight at the time, just for the record), I was WAY healthier than I am now. I'm very doubtful Covid could have killed the 35 year old me. But at 59, I'm far more susceptible.
Even if not one single person who was "on there way out" had died with Covid, that still leaves 70,000 who better fit my profile (or, so as not to let numbers get in the way, let's say 50,000), who don't fit the two categories PlanetVolunteer gave. I say that's significant, PlanetVounteer says (or, at least his statement implies) that it's not.
 

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