Wanya 3rd time in quarantine

#31

titansvolsfaninga

Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV
Joined
Mar 20, 2013
Messages
9,028
Likes
11,062
#31
If you are going to take it to those extremes you need to provide more substance to your statement. On Friday I saw a stat that around 20 major universities had 17,000 Covid cases with 0 hospitalizations
Where are you getting this information, because Universities don't normally release that information because of HIPPA, you know. Even if that is true, the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
 
#33

VolInDayton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2011
Messages
3,019
Likes
6,252
#33
Where are you getting this information, because Universities don't normally release that information because of HIPPA, you know. Even if that is true, the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
I haven't personally dug through all the data but the sources are listed in following tweets.


Families should be cautious of sick kids coming home if they are elderly and at risk. I think from the beginning there has been no data showing 18-30 year old category being at risk.

What can be debated is how we handle this virus. I think it is very dumb that we are seeing tens of thousands of college students going to crowded bars, there was one story about a crowded bar in Knoxville from this weekend, but they are being so overly cautious about 110 students that already have strict regulations and testing in place. Ignoring multiple negative test and still making players quarantine due to contact tracing isn't limiting the spread of coronavirus when everyone else in campus and on town are doing whatever they want.
 
#34

tennrich1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Messages
4,074
Likes
3,401
#34
Where are you getting this information, because Universities don't normally release that information because of HIPPA, you know. Even if that is true, the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
Actually HIPPA is person specific and not numbers specific. Not that I care just trying to keep it real.
 
#35

VFL-82-JP

Bleedin' Orange...
Joined
Jan 17, 2015
Messages
14,358
Likes
28,483
#35
...the real issue is that this 17,000 cases have to go home at some point to their families, unless these 17,000 kids are staying at the Universities during the duration of this pandemic. These 17,000 kids have older parents, older relatives that they MAY come in contact with.
So step back a minute and consider what you're saying.

In particular, pay attention to four key facts:

(a) these lads are being tested for covid-19 three times a week. Every two days, more or less. They know if they've gotten it very quickly, much more quickly than you and I.
(b) the hazard only lasts about two weeks. That's how long a young, healthy person who has covid-19 is a hazard to pass it on to others.
(c) most college kids go home 2-4 times a year. Thanksgiving maybe, Christmas/New Years, spring break maybe, and summer. Football players usually do not go home at Thanksgiving (mid-season). So the next opportunity most of our lads have to get home to family members is not for another three months or so. But even for those few who live locally and could go home any given weekend,...
(d) our lads have brains. They're capable of thinking through the risks they may pose to a parent, grandparent, or other loved one. They also have hearts. They'll care enough to avoid contact with those loved ones if they think there's a chance they may be carrying the virus.

Put those four facts together, and you'll see that the risk of the lads passing covid-19 on to a vulnerable family member is actually very low. I certainly wouldn't rearrange their lives around it. Instead, I would let them manage it themselves.

Let's don't mouth-breathe over this, and let's do give our players credit for being intelligent, thoughtful human beings.

We really don't need this severe level of control over them. We're over-doing it. Purely to assuage the heavy mouth-breathing of those alarmists (and political opportunists) who happen to hold key political offices or positions in college administrations...so we can play football.


p.s. Contrast the level of control our universities are exerting over our players with the level of control they exercise over the rest of the student body. Thrice-weekly testing? Oh no, I think probably no testing at all unless the student goes to the health center and asks for one, or unless contact tracing points them out. Controlling when they get home? As far as I know, not at all. I'm sure the university is reminding all students to be careful and thoughtful with visits home, but their schedules are much more open than the football players at this time of year. It is striking, once you think about it. No, all this extra effort isn't to protect grandma. The effort is to satisfy nega-covid19s (i just invented that term, heh) like the governors of North Carolina and Michigan so that the lads can play football (hasn't worked yet--yet--with the Michigan one).
 
Last edited:
#36

ArmchairQB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2014
Messages
136
Likes
190
#36
Just to round out the data... You don't even have to look at COVID-19 or how severe it is or isn't, to know that something is going on and people are dying of something. There's a subset of census and health data called excess mortality, that looks at how often people die, period, of anything, including old age and disease and accidents and insane rocket car stunts on salt flats or whatever all else. Here are a couple of graphics that show what that looks like.

Screen Shot 2020-09-14 at 9.59.11 AM.png
Screen Shot 2020-09-14 at 9.59.48 AM.png

It really doesn't matter if the CDC releases revised numbers saying that COVID-19 kills some smaller number of people. Those numbers are simply showing people who have no other comorbidity to potentially attribute things to, but again it doesn't matter. Since COVID-19 became a thing, we've had weeks in the US where a spare 20,000 people a week or so were dying of something or other, beyond what anyone would typically expect out of that week based on past years. Now we're settling down into somewhat lower territory, but still considerably outside the norm. When all's said and done, this year will go down with hundreds of thousands of extra dead, without anyone having to go and politicize whatever it was they died from.

All that to say that universities have to do something. You adjust your school year so that your students aren't going home on fall break and getting grandma sick, and you quarantine people over exposure until you know they're not becoming symptomatic themselves, and this and that and the other thing. Partly because you want to mitigate things as much as you can, but also in all likelihood because you need to be in a position where you can genuinely say you made the best effort you could. That way, when someone inevitably does go home and then grandma gets sick and dies and the student sorts out that she got it from him and he got it from his roommate, or a ball game, or whatever, you can say that every effort was made to provide as safe an environment as possible.

Edit: and also consider that even if the students are staying on campus every day for the entire semester and don't go home until after Thanksgiving, they're sharing a campus with thousands of employees who go home every day.
 
#37

titansvolsfaninga

Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV
Joined
Mar 20, 2013
Messages
9,028
Likes
11,062
#37
So step back a minute and consider what you're saying.

In particular, pay attention to four key facts:

(a) these lads are being tested for covid-19 three times a week. Every two days, more or less. They know if they've gotten it very quickly, much more quickly than you and I.
(b) the hazard only lasts about two weeks. That's how long a young, healthy person who has covid-19 is a hazard to pass it on to others.
(c) most college kids go home 2-4 times a year. Thanksgiving maybe, Christmas/New Years, spring break maybe, and summer. Football players usually do not go home at Thanksgiving (mid-season). So the next opportunity most of our lads have to get home to family members is not for another three months or so. But even for those few who live locally and could go home any given weekend,...
(d) our lads have brains. They're capable of thinking through the risks they may pose to a parent, grandparent, or other loved one. They also have hearts. They'll care enough to avoid contact with those loved ones if they think there's a chance they may be carrying the virus.

Put those four facts together, and you'll see that the risk of the lads passing covid-19 on to a vulnerable family member is actually very low. I certainly wouldn't rearrange their lives around it. Instead, I would let them manage it themselves.

Let's don't mouth-breathe over this, and let's do give our players credit for being intelligent, thoughtful human beings.

We really don't need this severe level of control over them. We're over-doing it. Purely to assuage the heavy mouth-breathing of those alarmists (and political opportunists) who happen to hold key political offices or positions in college administrations...so we can play football.


p.s. Contrast the level of control our universities are exerting over our players with the level of control they exercise over the rest of the student body. Thrice-weekly testing? Oh no, I think probably no testing at all unless the student goes to the health center and asks for one, or unless contact tracing points them out. Controlling when they get home? As far as I know, not at all. I'm sure the university is reminding all students to be careful and thoughtful with visits home, but their schedules are much more open than the football players at this time of year. It is striking, once you think about it. No, all this extra effort isn't to protect grandma. The effort is to satisfy nega-covid19s (i just invented that term, heh) like the governors of North Carolina and Michigan so that the lads can play football (hasn't worked yet--yet--with the Michigan one).
I think the 17k cases was referencing the general student body, not athletes.
 
#39

titansvolsfaninga

Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV
Joined
Mar 20, 2013
Messages
9,028
Likes
11,062
#39
Ah, sorry. Thought we were talking about covid-19 as it applies to our football team specifically. Didn't realize you guys expanded to discussing the student body in general.
not on purpose....we tend to go off on tangents. At least i do....my apologies for derailing the discussion.
 
#40

Cormock Mac

Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2019
Messages
44
Likes
74
#40
Just to round out the data... You don't even have to look at COVID-19 or how severe it is or isn't, to know that something is going on and people are dying of something. There's a subset of census and health data called excess mortality, that looks at how often people die, period, of anything, including old age and disease and accidents and insane rocket car stunts on salt flats or whatever all else. Here are a couple of graphics that show what that looks like.

View attachment 306398
View attachment 306399

It really doesn't matter if the CDC releases revised numbers saying that COVID-19 kills some smaller number of people. Those numbers are simply showing people who have no other comorbidity to potentially attribute things to, but again it doesn't matter. Since COVID-19 became a thing, we've had weeks in the US where a spare 20,000 people a week or so were dying of something or other, beyond what anyone would typically expect out of that week based on past years. Now we're settling down into somewhat lower territory, but still considerably outside the norm. When all's said and done, this year will go down with hundreds of thousands of extra dead, without anyone having to go and politicize whatever it was they died from.

All that to say that universities have to do something. You adjust your school year so that your students aren't going home on fall break and getting grandma sick, and you quarantine people over exposure until you know they're not becoming symptomatic themselves, and this and that and the other thing. Partly because you want to mitigate things as much as you can, but also in all likelihood because you need to be in a position where you can genuinely say you made the best effort you could. That way, when someone inevitably does go home and then grandma gets sick and dies and the student sorts out that she got it from him and he got it from his roommate, or a ball game, or whatever, you can say that every effort was made to provide as safe an environment as possible.

Edit: and also consider that even if the students are staying on campus every day for the entire semester and don't go home until after Thanksgiving, they're sharing a campus with thousands of employees who go home every day.
Refreshing to get something sensible. Excess deaths stats show that people are dying in far greater numbers than one would expect. They are dying of something. Any sensible conclusion would be to attribute these excess deaths to Corona. Excess deaths indicate that Corona deaths are underestimated rather than over estimated.
 
#43

82_VOL_83

Pruitt to me one more time
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
33,412
Likes
19,058
#43
Refreshing to get something sensible. Excess deaths stats show that people are dying in far greater numbers than one would expect. They are dying of something. Any sensible conclusion would be to attribute these excess deaths to Corona. Excess deaths indicate that Corona deaths are underestimated rather than over estimated.
If you can contribute all the excess deaths to Covid 19, then what percentage of those deaths were to people that were simply old and confined to nursing homes where the cases went rampant. AIDS kills also but we didn't shut AIDS positive people up in a confined population with non-AIDS positive people and then expect them not to contract it. Not a good analogy but it's the only other "real" killer pandemic that has garnered this type of attention in my lifetime. Also, why has the death rate plummeted yet positive cases are level most places and higher others? Could it be that far more people than originally thought contracted this disease and had mild to no symptoms? All of this can be looked at from many different directions and different conclusions drawn.
 
#44

Skullbone

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
1,848
Likes
2,430
#44
Seems to me the teams who've had the most players already get and recover from Covid will be the teams with an advantage. Stretching it out may only prolong the suffering when you're dealing with very low risk individuals.
 
Likes: LAVol1
#48

PlanetVolunteer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
639
Likes
1,428
#48
COVID at worst has taken people who were already on their way out sooner with some tragedies here and there with younger people who are obese or other severe comorbidities.

The faster though, you can spread this virus through say....a college campus where the current rate of hospitalization is at ZERO, you can create a herd immunity so you can SAVE LIVES.

See Sweden.
 
#49

ftsandersvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
1,778
Likes
2,117
#49
Just to round out the data... You don't even have to look at COVID-19 or how severe it is or isn't, to know that something is going on and people are dying of something. There's a subset of census and health data called excess mortality, that looks at how often people die, period, of anything, including old age and disease and accidents and insane rocket car stunts on salt flats or whatever all else. Here are a couple of graphics that show what that looks like.

View attachment 306398
View attachment 306399

It really doesn't matter if the CDC releases revised numbers saying that COVID-19 kills some smaller number of people. Those numbers are simply showing people who have no other comorbidity to potentially attribute things to, but again it doesn't matter. Since COVID-19 became a thing, we've had weeks in the US where a spare 20,000 people a week or so were dying of something or other, beyond what anyone would typically expect out of that week based on past years. Now we're settling down into somewhat lower territory, but still considerably outside the norm. When all's said and done, this year will go down with hundreds of thousands of extra dead, without anyone having to go and politicize whatever it was they died from.

All that to say that universities have to do something. You adjust your school year so that your students aren't going home on fall break and getting grandma sick, and you quarantine people over exposure until you know they're not becoming symptomatic themselves, and this and that and the other thing. Partly because you want to mitigate things as much as you can, but also in all likelihood because you need to be in a position where you can genuinely say you made the best effort you could. That way, when someone inevitably does go home and then grandma gets sick and dies and the student sorts out that she got it from him and he got it from his roommate, or a ball game, or whatever, you can say that every effort was made to provide as safe an environment as possible.

Edit: and also consider that even if the students are staying on campus every day for the entire semester and don't go home until after Thanksgiving, they're sharing a campus with thousands of employees who go home every day.
scientist.gif
 
Likes: Volanta

VN Store




Sponsors
 

Top