Recruiting Forum Off Topic Thread III

delfonic

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I really don't have time for this today, but...@#%@#...Here goes....A retired DEA agent sent this to me last week...This is just a quick sample...
(from Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
January 2019 * Volume 48, Number 1 * Alex Berenson)...
I've read the article and Berenson cherry-picked and sensationalized. His proof is largely anecdotal accounts of folks being high on pot while they did terrible things.
 

NashVolDavis

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I believe it needs to be fully legal because lots of people do not want to go to the doctors and instead self medicate. Some people just know what helps them without need of going and spending money at a doctor office and may be put on prescription drugs that can do more harm than good. Imo
Absolutely. It’s wayyy safer than most pills and considerably cheaper. It’s a natural product, and in my experience, very effective. People that have found relief and improved quality of life with harmless MJ use in their own homes, etc, shouldn’t have to “break the law” to do so.
 

Ashevolle

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I really don't have time for this today, but...@#%@#...Here goes....A retired DEA agent sent this to me last week...This is just a quick sample...
(from Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
January 2019 * Volume 48, Number 1 * Alex Berenson)...
Over the last 30 years, psychiatrists and epidemiologists have turned speculation about marijuana's dangers into science. Yet over the same period, a shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign has pushed public attitudes about marijuana the other way. And the effects are now becoming apparent.

Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong.

They've told you marijuana has many different medical uses. In reality marijuana and THC, its active ingredient, have been shown to work only in a few narrow conditions. They are most commonly prescribed for pain relief. But they are rarely tested against other pain relief drugs like ibuprofen-and in July, a large four-year study of patients with chronic pain in Australia showed cannabis use was associated with greater pain over time.
They've told you cannabis can stem opioid use-"Two new studies show how marijuana can help fight the opioid epidemic," according to Wonkblog, a Washington Post website, in April 2018- and that marijuana's effects as a painkiller make it a potential substitute for opiates. In reality, like alcohol, marijuana is too weak as a painkiller to work for most people who truly need opiates, such as terminal cancer patients. Even cannabis advocates, like Rob Kampia, the co-founder of the Marijuana Policy Project, acknowledge that they have always viewed medical marijuana laws primarily as a way to protect recreational users.

As for the marijuana-reduces-opiate-use theory, it is based largely on a single paper comparing overdose deaths by state before 2010 to the spread of medical marijuana laws- and the paper's finding is probably a result of simple geographic coincidence. The opiate epidemic began in Appalachia, while the first states to legalize medical marijuana were in the West. Since 2010, as both the epidemic and medical marijuana laws have spread nationally, the finding has vanished. And the United States, the Western country with the most cannabis use, also has by far the worst problem with opioids.


....There is way more to the article, but you get the gist...

The article primarily discusses marijuana and psychosis...Do you want to discuss this here, or elsewhere?
You do realize that is not a scholarly article right? It's a reprinting of a speech by a journalist holding degrees in history and economics. Not that such a person cannot be well informed on the subject, but the "article" is devoid of citations and or analysis of any kind. Its merely a collection conclusory statements without reference to where those conclusions are derived.
 

ColoradoVol8

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Most people who are addicted to pills are also marijuana users. It is not an either/or situation. They go together.

You can believe the hype or not, but it follows the same pattern as cigarettes, opioids of the '90's (non-addictive), alcohol (wine for your heart), etc. Follow the money, and you will see why marijuana supposedly is good for anything that ails you. It's just proper marketing strategy.

If marijuana helps children with seizures, other people with pain, I am all for it in their case, but the FDA is approving medications that will eventually take care of this issue, without "legalization" being necessary. That is, assuming that the science really stands up to scrutiny, which I doubt that most of it will.
Extremely ignorant post. Alcohol users have a much higher correlation to pill poppers. Alcohol is much worse for people than marijuana.
 
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I know the "prevailing wisdom" is that marijuana cures everything in life, and beyond. I stand by what I said, and I promise I am not ignorant on the subject.

Talk to a cigarette smoker, and he can likely validate his reasons for smoking. Heck, some people have smoked their whole life, and died (healthy) at 100 years old. Still, almost 500,000 people die every year from cigarette smoking in the U.S., and most smokers are truly hooked on nicotine, and dearly wish they knew how to quit.

I could show information about spychosis, etc., but we all know that everyone is going to stand their gound. I get it that people enjoy their weed, and a lot of people are giving out "data" to support that.

...I have a life, and I am just going to leave it to everyone else to discuss, or not. I did not start this discussion, but I do have right to my opinion, like everyone else.
Just like with any culture, say the Taliban for Instance. Been told their entire life that blowing yourself up and becoming a martyr will get you 72 virgins in heaven. If somebody only looks at one angle their whole life it is hard to get through to them even if it was a lie the whole time. Opening of ones mind to see all the possibilities is essential for one not to be controlled. Imo the video I posted is by far the most current and in depth knowledge I have ever gleaned on the subject. It get to America late in it, but without watching all that transpired yo to that point, it's kind of hard to judge based on one civilized culture.
 
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You do realize that is not a scholarly article right? It's a reprinting of a speech by a journalist holding degrees in history and economics. Not that such a person cannot be well informed on the subject, but the "article" is devoid of citations and or analysis of any kind. Its merely a collection conclusory statements without reference to where those conclusions are derived.
But my former DEA agent buddy...
 

NashVolDavis

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I really don't have time for this today, but...@#%@#...Here goes....A retired DEA agent sent this to me last week...This is just a quick sample...
(from Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
January 2019 * Volume 48, Number 1 * Alex Berenson)...
Over the last 30 years, psychiatrists and epidemiologists have turned speculation about marijuana's dangers into science. Yet over the same period, a shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign has pushed public attitudes about marijuana the other way. And the effects are now becoming apparent.

Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong.

They've told you marijuana has many different medical uses. In reality marijuana and THC, its active ingredient, have been shown to work only in a few narrow conditions. They are most commonly prescribed for pain relief. But they are rarely tested against other pain relief drugs like ibuprofen-and in July, a large four-year study of patients with chronic pain in Australia showed cannabis use was associated with greater pain over time.
They've told you cannabis can stem opioid use-"Two new studies show how marijuana can help fight the opioid epidemic," according to Wonkblog, a Washington Post website, in April 2018- and that marijuana's effects as a painkiller make it a potential substitute for opiates. In reality, like alcohol, marijuana is too weak as a painkiller to work for most people who truly need opiates, such as terminal cancer patients. Even cannabis advocates, like Rob Kampia, the co-founder of the Marijuana Policy Project, acknowledge that they have always viewed medical marijuana laws primarily as a way to protect recreational users.

As for the marijuana-reduces-opiate-use theory, it is based largely on a single paper comparing overdose deaths by state before 2010 to the spread of medical marijuana laws- and the paper's finding is probably a result of simple geographic coincidence. The opiate epidemic began in Appalachia, while the first states to legalize medical marijuana were in the West. Since 2010, as both the epidemic and medical marijuana laws have spread nationally, the finding has vanished. And the United States, the Western country with the most cannabis use, also has by far the worst problem with opioids.


....There is way more to the article, but you get the gist...

The article primarily discusses marijuana and psychosis...Do you want to discuss this here, or elsewhere?
I don’t really think it’s necessary to discuss how to DEA feels about weed...those dudes have been brainwashed, along with much of the conservative voting base, to believe that MJ is a “drug.” It’s a plant. Impossible to OD on, naturally occurring, non-addictive, effective, and if it were legal, easy and cheap to grow yourself. Big pharma nightmare. It’s all political, going back to the 60s/70s. In the future I really believe we will look at these times as we look back now at prohibition. It’s certainly not American.
 
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I really don't have time for this today, but...@#%@#...Here goes....A retired DEA agent sent this to me last week...This is just a quick sample...
(from Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence
January 2019 * Volume 48, Number 1 * Alex Berenson)...
Over the last 30 years, psychiatrists and epidemiologists have turned speculation about marijuana's dangers into science. Yet over the same period, a shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign has pushed public attitudes about marijuana the other way. And the effects are now becoming apparent.

Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong.

They've told you marijuana has many different medical uses. In reality marijuana and THC, its active ingredient, have been shown to work only in a few narrow conditions. They are most commonly prescribed for pain relief. But they are rarely tested against other pain relief drugs like ibuprofen-and in July, a large four-year study of patients with chronic pain in Australia showed cannabis use was associated with greater pain over time.
They've told you cannabis can stem opioid use-"Two new studies show how marijuana can help fight the opioid epidemic," according to Wonkblog, a Washington Post website, in April 2018- and that marijuana's effects as a painkiller make it a potential substitute for opiates. In reality, like alcohol, marijuana is too weak as a painkiller to work for most people who truly need opiates, such as terminal cancer patients. Even cannabis advocates, like Rob Kampia, the co-founder of the Marijuana Policy Project, acknowledge that they have always viewed medical marijuana laws primarily as a way to protect recreational users.

As for the marijuana-reduces-opiate-use theory, it is based largely on a single paper comparing overdose deaths by state before 2010 to the spread of medical marijuana laws- and the paper's finding is probably a result of simple geographic coincidence. The opiate epidemic began in Appalachia, while the first states to legalize medical marijuana were in the West. Since 2010, as both the epidemic and medical marijuana laws have spread nationally, the finding has vanished. And the United States, the Western country with the most cannabis use, also has by far the worst problem with opioids.


....There is way more to the article, but you get the gist...

The article primarily discusses marijuana and psychosis...Do you want to discuss this here, or elsewhere?
I retired DEA agent 🤔 he just wants to keep the Private Prison population up since it is on the NYSE. How do we get that stock up. Lock people up. Who's paying tha average 43,000 dollars a year per inmate, We The People.
 

InVOLuntary

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Most people who are addicted to pills are also marijuana users. It is not an either/or situation. They go together.

You can believe the hype or not, but it follows the same pattern as cigarettes, opioids of the '90's (non-addictive), alcohol (wine for your heart), etc. Follow the money, and you will see why marijuana supposedly is good for anything that ails you. It's just proper marketing strategy.

If marijuana helps children with seizures, other people with pain, I am all for it in their case, but the FDA is approving medications that will eventually take care of this issue, without "legalization" being necessary. That is, assuming that the science really stands up to scrutiny, which I doubt that most of it will.
The FDA is in the pocket of big pharma. Big Pharma doesn't want something you can grow in your kitchen window competing with $10 pills that they have $.01 in. If you're looking to the FDA to make sure you're getting the best meds, you're sadly mistaken.
 

i2amavol

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I don’t really think it’s necessary to discuss how to DEA feels about weed...those dudes have been brainwashed, along with much of the conservative voting base, to believe that MJ is a “drug.” It’s a plant. Impossible to OD on, naturally occurring, non-addictive, effective, and if it were legal, easy and cheap to grow yourself. Big pharma nightmare. It’s all political, going back to the 60s/70s. In the future I really believe we will look at these times as we look back now at prohibition. It’s certainly not American.
Opium , tobacco, poison ivy, etc. are plants too. Marijuana is addictive...I blieve we will look back on it like cigarettes and opioids. We will realized that we were duped once again...Are you trying to tell me that a substance that makes you high is not a drug?! Really?!
 
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Opium , tobacco, poison ivy, etc. are plants too. Marijuana is addictive...I blieve we will look back on it like cigarettes and opioids. We will realized that we were duped once again...Are you trying to tell me that a substance that makes you high is not a drug?! Really?!
MJ has been around since the beginning of humanity,probably before. Now Milk makes my Dad have very upset stomach, should we ban it. People die from peanuts allergies, why is it not illegal, certainly more harmful than humans original medicine.
 

SweetAsSodaPop

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Most people who are addicted to pills are also marijuana users. It is not an either/or situation. They go together.

You can believe the hype or not, but it follows the same pattern as cigarettes, opioids of the '90's (non-addictive), alcohol (wine for your heart), etc. Follow the money, and you will see why marijuana supposedly is good for anything that ails you. It's just proper marketing strategy.

If marijuana helps children with seizures, other people with pain, I am all for it in their case, but the FDA is approving medications that will eventually take care of this issue, without "legalization" being necessary. That is, assuming that the science really stands up to scrutiny, which I doubt that most of it will.
In all due respect, I beg to differ. FDA approval takes forever. From development to approval it can take 10 - 12 years. Once it is approved most often it is unaffordable to the average family. For those of us with children or family members who have tried everything available, including traveling to other countries for treatments not available in the U.S., you can bet legalization brings great hope.

Easy to say when you are on the outside looking in. When it is your own family things look a whole lot different. Not much you wouldn't try.
 

i2amavol

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The FDA is in the pocket of big pharma. Big Pharma doesn't want something you can grow in your kitchen window competing with $10 pills that they have $.01 in. If you're looking to the FDA to make sure you're getting the best meds, you're sadly mistaken.
OK. You are right. I would rather trust drug dealers from mehico.

I am not going to disagree that there are confounding factors, but that doesn't change my original statements.
 

volinjackson

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Pulls pin throws grenade.....I don’t believe any “drugs” should be illegal. What you choose to ingest, smoke or inject into your body should be your business, not a fan of victimless crimes...and no I don’t do any “drugs” but it’s not mine or the governments business if you choose to.
 

Nashvegas31

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Pulls pin throws grenade.....I don’t believe any “drugs” should be illegal. What you choose to ingest, smoke or inject into your body should be your business, not a fan of victimless crimes...and no I don’t do any “drugs” but it’s not mine or the governments business if you choose to.
Sound like something someone would say that has never had anyone close to them addicted to some of the mess out there. Marijuana isn't anything when managed. Some hardcore stuff out there only takes one curious attempt to kill you or make you addicted and do something that changes your life and your families
 

i2amavol

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In all due respect, I beg to differ. FDA approval takes forever. From development to approval it can take 10 - 12 years. Once it is approved most often it is unaffordable to the average family. For those of us with children or family members who have tried everything available, including traveling to other countries for treatments not available in the U.S., you can bet legalization brings great hope.

Easy to say when you are on the outside looking in. When it is your own family things look a whole lot different. Not much you wouldn't try.
Even if TN makes medical marijuana legal, it is still not legal at the federal level. If you think your kid needs it, I am sure you can get it. I for one would have to be pretty desperate to give it to a child, legal or not.

Here is the thing: There are what, 200, maybe 500 kids in Tennessee who "need" medical marijuana, but there are about 365 people a year in Knox County alone who are dying from overdose. If you think most of those people didn't start out on marijuana, you are sadly mistaken.

I do not personally know if an ingredient in marijuana is really helping kids with seizures, but give me a break...The marijuana industry is simply using this miracle drug thing, in order to get marijuana legalized. If they studied some other plant, they could probably find similar "miracle" substances that would help too.

It is mostly snake oil, plain and simple. Most positive effects are very mild.

I do not doubt that many people really, really enjoy their highs, but this whole hoopla about it is crap, intended to help the rich get richer.
 

i2amavol

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Have you ever smoked marijuana?
No.

I do not doubt that it is really, really fun. It probably really relaxes the individual, and makes them feel great for a moment. That is why it has so many proponents, duh.

I work in the field of drug addiction. I see the effects drugs have on people and their families. I am looking at it from the big picture.

Just like with cigarettes, I know that each individual's mileage may vary.
 

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