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HollowaytoSeivers

This IS my uniform thread
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My version of Covid was a cough that I couldn't shake and a low grade fever. I was like Volball09, it was probably about a week in before I realized what was happening. My wife and son wound up quarantined longer than I was, and neither one of them ever were diagnosed positive.
 
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Had COVID this week. It was so mild I didn’t even realize I was sick until almost a week in. Definitely part of why it spreads so readily. Many of us hardly felt ill! Had an upset stomach to start with, then a very mild fever a few days later. Then no symptoms at all for 5 days. Then Saturday I woke up a bit congested with absolutely no smell and no taste. Today marks day 13 since onset of symptoms. Very very mild for me thankfully. I’m essentially back to normal except my sense of smell is still diminished.

Wonder if they can have more fans if we can prove we’ve already had it?
I have had two negative tests since then...I'm in!
 

lvocd

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Had COVID this week. It was so mild I didn’t even realize I was sick until almost a week in. Definitely part of why it spreads so readily. Many of us hardly felt ill! Had an upset stomach to start with, then a very mild fever a few days later. Then no symptoms at all for 5 days. Then Saturday I woke up a bit congested with absolutely no smell and no taste. Today marks day 13 since onset of symptoms. Very very mild for me thankfully. I’m essentially back to normal except my sense of smell is still diminished.

Wonder if they can have more fans if we can prove we’ve already had it?
Unfortunately, contrary to popular belief, having it once doesn't guarantee you won't get it again. Also, beware that many people who've had the seemingly minor symptom of loss of the sense of smell have reported as having later developed a bizarre sensory aversion to certain foods. For instance, a lifelong chocolate lover might suddenly find that chocolate smells and tastes like rotten eggs. Or the scent of something normally lovely and fragrant like lavender suddenly smells like rotting meat. There are many, many cases of this happening, so beware.
 

VolBall09

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Unfortunately, contrary to popular belief, having it once doesn't guarantee you won't get it again. Also, beware that many people who've had the seemingly minor symptom of loss of the sense of smell have reported as having later developed a bizarre sensory aversion to certain foods. For instance, a lifelong chocolate lover might suddenly find that chocolate smells and tastes like rotten eggs. Or the scent of something normally lovely and fragrant like lavender suddenly smells like rotting meat. There are many, many cases of this happening, so beware.
I’m well aware. It does provide you temporary immunity of at least several months. Re-infection is the exception, not the rule based on case reports. It’s important to allow facts and science to prevail. I have a degree in molecular cellular biology and I’m a physician. I don’t get on here and spout off about COVID. Simply sharing my personal experience and offering some humor and a novel solution for possibly having more fans at games.

And yes, I’m a physician and barely recognized that I was ill. That’s how mild my infection was. I have been discussing COVID daily and have been monitoring myself for months and I went a full week before realizing I had it. Thankfully this is how it will be for most people. I for one do not think shutdowns are the answer. If you’re high risk, by all means, stay yourself at home. Those at low risk should be allowed to make those decisions for themselves. Now that we have more targeted therapeutics the mortality rate has dropped remarkably. It’s still a very serious infection for some, but it’s certainly manageable for most. With a vaccine on the horizon I imagine brighter days ahead.
 

Rickster

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I never knew I had it either. Decided to get tested after 4 July since almost everyone in my neck of the woods refused to implement the avoidance protocols. Never had any symptoms but did worry a lot after testing positive. It seemed, at the time, to be a death sentence, because of the way it was politically militarized.
 

Amb3096

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I'm pretty sure I had it back in February. I had this weird dry cough that was unlike anything I've ever had before. I probably spread it to my whole office.
 
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I never knew I had it either. Decided to get tested after 4 July since almost everyone in my neck of the woods refused to implement the avoidance protocols. Never had any symptoms but did worry a lot after testing positive. It seemed, at the time, to be a death sentence, because of the way it was politically militarized.
Bingo
I went into an immediate scare when diagnosed positive in May,,,then a day later the symptoms subsided
 

lvocd

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I never knew I had it either. Decided to get tested after 4 July since almost everyone in my neck of the woods refused to implement the avoidance protocols. Never had any symptoms but did worry a lot after testing positive. It seemed, at the time, to be a death sentence, because of the way it was politically militarized.
In my opinion, it's better to be overly cautious than under-cautious concerning the virus since, as far as I know, there's no sure-fire way to tell who will or will not actually end up dying from it. I've read about people, young and older, who were in good health and with no underlying issues inexplicably dying from it. Yes, it's rare that that happens -- thank goodness! -- but it does happen. So when some folks think the virus is being, as you say, "politically militarized," I'm thinking, "Thank goodness there are people pounding it into everyone's minds that there are simple things I can do to help prevent my ever getting it since there's no way of knowing whether or not I'll be one of those rare, shocking deaths from it."

On the flip-side, I've also read about people who you'd think might die from it given all the pre-existing conditions they had, or their advanced age, etc., making it through it like champs. What makes it worth taking extra precautions is that no-one knows yet why there are exceptions to the rule. Would I be one of the lucky people who barely even notice they'd had it? Or would I be one of the unlucky ones who inexplicably died? I, for one, don't want to find out.
 

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