NIL final thoughts

#1

tennesseeduke

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Messages
8,229
Likes
8,573
#1
Based on what, exactly?
The old NCAA rules that exploited the athletes and that were violations of federal law?
I'm reposting my thoughts from another thread and I know I'm beating a dead horse, but this was got me thinking about differences in college and pros in response on the other thread. We all have opinions and I certainly respect them, and we all will not agree on everything, that's what makes VOLNATION blog site so great. I've been on here for a long time myself and I've been a UT fan for 53 years. I've seen great players during that span give their all for Tennessee and that is what makes me love all sports in college. (Reggie White, Condredge Holloway, Dale Carter, Peyton Manning, Bernard King, Grant Williams, Monica Abbot, Candice Parker, Jamal Lewis, Casey Clausen, Tee Martin, Eric Ainge, Leonard Little, Al Wilson, Heath Shular, Tony Robinson, Alan Cockrell...... All those players and many more came to UT AND GAVE THEIR ALL AS VFLs. That's why I love college sports and not so much pro. I will say, I'm not much of a pro fan not near the level I am for college. I'll take a day off from work to go to a UT game. I'll check my phone for my favorite pro team score. That's the difference.

Below is my response from the other thread question:
The Old NCAA rules as you put them, became an issue only when Ed O'Bannon realized that he could be paid for the use of his NIL. I'm sorry it's not federal law breaking what's happening in college athletics. If you ever read, then you would understand that the intent for NIL based on the Courts ruling of they said laws you are claiming broken was full cost of attendance at the school, Scholarships for Athletes, living expenses, and anything that the NCAA was not covering already. Football players were making on top of all that before this debacle an average prior to 2020 $30,000 to $40,000 each on top of all other expenses paid. O'Bannon also won from the Supreme Court $42.2 million for fees and costs as his case went nearly 10 years. He did not win all that money because of NIL itself! Read below the following based on the court ruling:

The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. Final written closing statements were submitted on July 10.

On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of barring payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of-attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility.

The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights. The Supreme Court denied the NCAA's appeal. The NCAA was also ordered to pay the plaintiffs $42.2 million in fees and costs.


So your quote of the "Old NCAA" should simply be providing additional funds to Student Athletes when their NIL is used outside of normal play on the field. I.E. name in a video game, commercial, billboard, jersey sell, .......It was never intended (just 3.5 years ago) for a school to pay a player millions, pick up $300,000 cars at dealerships, tampering, transferring for more, demanding anything from a coach etc....I'm not sure what more explanation you need but COLLEGE FOOTBALL is not and was not and should not be for this.

I don't care if NICO leads Tennesse to 3 straight NCAA Championships, paying him $8,000,000 is absolutely ridiculous and it started his senior year in high school and not even college. THAT IS F'ED UP! The argument that coaches can do it is absolutely stupid! The coach is a professional who HAS GONE TO COLLEGE AND is not enrolled in classes at the university and is paid to do a JOB! If another job is willing to pay him or her more, then because they are professionals, they have a right to barter that salary opportunity. This is the same as you can do with your career and anyone who is WORKING. The Student Athlete should come to the university because that's where they want to get their education and play for a school they love and want to be at. They should not be coming to that school because they will get paid more. That's the NFL a PAID job for professionals who have finished college and are now looking to expand on what they have learned and trained for.
IT'S COLLEGE AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL. IT'S NOT THE NFL AND PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL!


College football may survive, but as we know and love, it will never be the same unless major changes happen very quickly. If people cannot realize what coaches, and leaders, "NOT KIDS" are saying, then there is no hope, and it will die! MONEY AND GREED ARE AT THE ROOT!
 
#2
#2
I'm reposting my thoughts from another thread and I know I'm beating a dead horse, but this was got me thinking about differences in college and pros in response on the other thread. We all have opinions and I certainly respect them, and we all will not agree on everything, that's what makes VOLNATION blog site so great. I've been on here for a long time myself and I've been a UT fan for 53 years. I've seen great players during that span give their all for Tennessee and that is what makes me love all sports in college. (Reggie White, Condredge Holloway, Dale Carter, Peyton Manning, Bernard King, Grant Williams, Monica Abbot, Candice Parker, Jamal Lewis, Casey Clausen, Tee Martin, Eric Ainge, Leonard Little, Al Wilson, Heath Shular, Tony Robinson, Alan Cockrell...... All those players and many more came to UT AND GAVE THEIR ALL AS VFLs. That's why I love college sports and not so much pro. I will say, I'm not much of a pro fan not near the level I am for college. I'll take a day off from work to go to a UT game. I'll check my phone for my favorite pro team score. That's the difference.

Below is my response from the other thread question:
The Old NCAA rules as you put them, became an issue only when Ed O'Bannon realized that he could be paid for the use of his NIL. I'm sorry it's not federal law breaking what's happening in college athletics. If you ever read, then you would understand that the intent for NIL based on the Courts ruling of they said laws you are claiming broken was full cost of attendance at the school, Scholarships for Athletes, living expenses, and anything that the NCAA was not covering already. Football players were making on top of all that before this debacle an average prior to 2020 $30,000 to $40,000 each on top of all other expenses paid. O'Bannon also won from the Supreme Court $42.2 million for fees and costs as his case went nearly 10 years. He did not win all that money because of NIL itself! Read below the following based on the court ruling:

The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. Final written closing statements were submitted on July 10.

On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of barring payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of-attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility.

The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights. The Supreme Court denied the NCAA's appeal. The NCAA was also ordered to pay the plaintiffs $42.2 million in fees and costs.


So your quote of the "Old NCAA" should simply be providing additional funds to Student Athletes when their NIL is used outside of normal play on the field. I.E. name in a video game, commercial, billboard, jersey sell, .......It was never intended (just 3.5 years ago) for a school to pay a player millions, pick up $300,000 cars at dealerships, tampering, transferring for more, demanding anything from a coach etc....I'm not sure what more explanation you need but COLLEGE FOOTBALL is not and was not and should not be for this.

I don't care if NICO leads Tennesse to 3 straight NCAA Championships, paying him $8,000,000 is absolutely ridiculous and it started his senior year in high school and not even college. THAT IS F'ED UP! The argument that coaches can do it is absolutely stupid! The coach is a professional who HAS GONE TO COLLEGE AND is not enrolled in classes at the university and is paid to do a JOB! If another job is willing to pay him or her more, then because they are professionals, they have a right to barter that salary opportunity. This is the same as you can do with your career and anyone who is WORKING. The Student Athlete should come to the university because that's where they want to get their education and play for a school they love and want to be at. They should not be coming to that school because they will get paid more. That's the NFL a PAID job for professionals who have finished college and are now looking to expand on what they have learned and trained for.
IT'S COLLEGE AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL. IT'S NOT THE NFL AND PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL!


College football may survive, but as we know and love, it will never be the same unless major changes happen very quickly. If people cannot realize what coaches, and leaders, "NOT KIDS" are saying, then there is no hope, and it will die! MONEY AND GREED ARE AT THE ROOT!

Excellent points, and I don't disagree at all, but sadly the genie is now well out of the bottle and ain't going back in. If the NCAA, conferences, and schools had been proactive 25-30 years ago when the Monopoly money started pouring into college sports as the media whores began to realize its value, there may have been a chance to head off this tsunami.

Now, it's a done deal, and the filthy, corrupt Congress is being asked to intervene. Even the mere suggestion of getting Washington involved to fix this mess when they've never met a problem they couldn't f***k up and make worse is asinine on its face, and will only exacerbate the problem.
 
Last edited:
#3
#3
Excellent points, and I don't disagree at all, but sadly the genie is now well out of the bottle and ain't going back in. If the NCAA, conferences, and schools had been proactive 25-30 years ago when the Monopoly money started pouring into college sports as the media whores began to realize its value, there may have been a chance to head off this tsunami.

Now, it's a done deal, and now the filthy, corrupt Congress is being asked to intervene. Even the mere suggestion of getting Washington involved to fix this mess when they've never met a problem they couldn't f***k up and make worse is asinine on its face, and will only exacerbate the problem.
Yep and dragging politicians in to fix anything, should show you the desperate attempts to repair it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Remy, tbh and sami
#4
#4
I'm reposting my thoughts from another thread and I know I'm beating a dead horse, but this was got me thinking about differences in college and pros in response on the other thread. We all have opinions and I certainly respect them, and we all will not agree on everything, that's what makes VOLNATION blog site so great. I've been on here for a long time myself and I've been a UT fan for 53 years. I've seen great players during that span give their all for Tennessee and that is what makes me love all sports in college. (Reggie White, Condredge Holloway, Dale Carter, Peyton Manning, Bernard King, Grant Williams, Monica Abbot, Candice Parker, Jamal Lewis, Casey Clausen, Tee Martin, Eric Ainge, Leonard Little, Al Wilson, Heath Shular, Tony Robinson, Alan Cockrell...... All those players and many more came to UT AND GAVE THEIR ALL AS VFLs. That's why I love college sports and not so much pro. I will say, I'm not much of a pro fan not near the level I am for college. I'll take a day off from work to go to a UT game. I'll check my phone for my favorite pro team score. That's the difference.

Below is my response from the other thread question:
The Old NCAA rules as you put them, became an issue only when Ed O'Bannon realized that he could be paid for the use of his NIL. I'm sorry it's not federal law breaking what's happening in college athletics. If you ever read, then you would understand that the intent for NIL based on the Courts ruling of they said laws you are claiming broken was full cost of attendance at the school, Scholarships for Athletes, living expenses, and anything that the NCAA was not covering already. Football players were making on top of all that before this debacle an average prior to 2020 $30,000 to $40,000 each on top of all other expenses paid. O'Bannon also won from the Supreme Court $42.2 million for fees and costs as his case went nearly 10 years. He did not win all that money because of NIL itself! Read below the following based on the court ruling:

The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. Final written closing statements were submitted on July 10.

On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of barring payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of-attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility.

The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights. The Supreme Court denied the NCAA's appeal. The NCAA was also ordered to pay the plaintiffs $42.2 million in fees and costs.


So your quote of the "Old NCAA" should simply be providing additional funds to Student Athletes when their NIL is used outside of normal play on the field. I.E. name in a video game, commercial, billboard, jersey sell, .......It was never intended (just 3.5 years ago) for a school to pay a player millions, pick up $300,000 cars at dealerships, tampering, transferring for more, demanding anything from a coach etc....I'm not sure what more explanation you need but COLLEGE FOOTBALL is not and was not and should not be for this.

I don't care if NICO leads Tennesse to 3 straight NCAA Championships, paying him $8,000,000 is absolutely ridiculous and it started his senior year in high school and not even college. THAT IS F'ED UP! The argument that coaches can do it is absolutely stupid! The coach is a professional who HAS GONE TO COLLEGE AND is not enrolled in classes at the university and is paid to do a JOB! If another job is willing to pay him or her more, then because they are professionals, they have a right to barter that salary opportunity. This is the same as you can do with your career and anyone who is WORKING. The Student Athlete should come to the university because that's where they want to get their education and play for a school they love and want to be at. They should not be coming to that school because they will get paid more. That's the NFL a PAID job for professionals who have finished college and are now looking to expand on what they have learned and trained for.
IT'S COLLEGE AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL. IT'S NOT THE NFL AND PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL!


College football may survive, but as we know and love, it will never be the same unless major changes happen very quickly. If people cannot realize what coaches, and leaders, "NOT KIDS" are saying, then there is no hope, and it will die! MONEY AND GREED ARE AT THE ROOT!
3E78E456-83CF-4683-BB97-3229F534A6B4.gif
 
#6
#6
I'm reposting my thoughts from another thread and I know I'm beating a dead horse, but this was got me thinking about differences in college and pros in response on the other thread. We all have opinions and I certainly respect them, and we all will not agree on everything, that's what makes VOLNATION blog site so great. I've been on here for a long time myself and I've been a UT fan for 53 years. I've seen great players during that span give their all for Tennessee and that is what makes me love all sports in college. (Reggie White, Condredge Holloway, Dale Carter, Peyton Manning, Bernard King, Grant Williams, Monica Abbot, Candice Parker, Jamal Lewis, Casey Clausen, Tee Martin, Eric Ainge, Leonard Little, Al Wilson, Heath Shular, Tony Robinson, Alan Cockrell...... All those players and many more came to UT AND GAVE THEIR ALL AS VFLs. That's why I love college sports and not so much pro. I will say, I'm not much of a pro fan not near the level I am for college. I'll take a day off from work to go to a UT game. I'll check my phone for my favorite pro team score. That's the difference.

Below is my response from the other thread question:
The Old NCAA rules as you put them, became an issue only when Ed O'Bannon realized that he could be paid for the use of his NIL. I'm sorry it's not federal law breaking what's happening in college athletics. If you ever read, then you would understand that the intent for NIL based on the Courts ruling of they said laws you are claiming broken was full cost of attendance at the school, Scholarships for Athletes, living expenses, and anything that the NCAA was not covering already. Football players were making on top of all that before this debacle an average prior to 2020 $30,000 to $40,000 each on top of all other expenses paid. O'Bannon also won from the Supreme Court $42.2 million for fees and costs as his case went nearly 10 years. He did not win all that money because of NIL itself! Read below the following based on the court ruling:

The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. Final written closing statements were submitted on July 10.

On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of barring payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of-attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility.

The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights. The Supreme Court denied the NCAA's appeal. The NCAA was also ordered to pay the plaintiffs $42.2 million in fees and costs.


So your quote of the "Old NCAA" should simply be providing additional funds to Student Athletes when their NIL is used outside of normal play on the field. I.E. name in a video game, commercial, billboard, jersey sell, .......It was never intended (just 3.5 years ago) for a school to pay a player millions, pick up $300,000 cars at dealerships, tampering, transferring for more, demanding anything from a coach etc....I'm not sure what more explanation you need but COLLEGE FOOTBALL is not and was not and should not be for this.

I don't care if NICO leads Tennesse to 3 straight NCAA Championships, paying him $8,000,000 is absolutely ridiculous and it started his senior year in high school and not even college. THAT IS F'ED UP! The argument that coaches can do it is absolutely stupid! The coach is a professional who HAS GONE TO COLLEGE AND is not enrolled in classes at the university and is paid to do a JOB! If another job is willing to pay him or her more, then because they are professionals, they have a right to barter that salary opportunity. This is the same as you can do with your career and anyone who is WORKING. The Student Athlete should come to the university because that's where they want to get their education and play for a school they love and want to be at. They should not be coming to that school because they will get paid more. That's the NFL a PAID job for professionals who have finished college and are now looking to expand on what they have learned and trained for.
IT'S COLLEGE AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL. IT'S NOT THE NFL AND PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL!


College football may survive, but as we know and love, it will never be the same unless major changes happen very quickly. If people cannot realize what coaches, and leaders, "NOT KIDS" are saying, then there is no hope, and it will die! MONEY AND GREED ARE AT THE ROOT!
Simply put, I agree.
 
#8
#8
I'm reposting my thoughts from another thread and I know I'm beating a dead horse, but this was got me thinking about differences in college and pros in response on the other thread. We all have opinions and I certainly respect them, and we all will not agree on everything, that's what makes VOLNATION blog site so great. I've been on here for a long time myself and I've been a UT fan for 53 years. I've seen great players during that span give their all for Tennessee and that is what makes me love all sports in college. (Reggie White, Condredge Holloway, Dale Carter, Peyton Manning, Bernard King, Grant Williams, Monica Abbot, Candice Parker, Jamal Lewis, Casey Clausen, Tee Martin, Eric Ainge, Leonard Little, Al Wilson, Heath Shular, Tony Robinson, Alan Cockrell...... All those players and many more came to UT AND GAVE THEIR ALL AS VFLs. That's why I love college sports and not so much pro. I will say, I'm not much of a pro fan not near the level I am for college. I'll take a day off from work to go to a UT game. I'll check my phone for my favorite pro team score. That's the difference.

Below is my response from the other thread question:
The Old NCAA rules as you put them, became an issue only when Ed O'Bannon realized that he could be paid for the use of his NIL. I'm sorry it's not federal law breaking what's happening in college athletics. If you ever read, then you would understand that the intent for NIL based on the Courts ruling of they said laws you are claiming broken was full cost of attendance at the school, Scholarships for Athletes, living expenses, and anything that the NCAA was not covering already. Football players were making on top of all that before this debacle an average prior to 2020 $30,000 to $40,000 each on top of all other expenses paid. O'Bannon also won from the Supreme Court $42.2 million for fees and costs as his case went nearly 10 years. He did not win all that money because of NIL itself! Read below the following based on the court ruling:

The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. Final written closing statements were submitted on July 10.

On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of barring payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of-attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility.

The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights. The Supreme Court denied the NCAA's appeal. The NCAA was also ordered to pay the plaintiffs $42.2 million in fees and costs.


So your quote of the "Old NCAA" should simply be providing additional funds to Student Athletes when their NIL is used outside of normal play on the field. I.E. name in a video game, commercial, billboard, jersey sell, .......It was never intended (just 3.5 years ago) for a school to pay a player millions, pick up $300,000 cars at dealerships, tampering, transferring for more, demanding anything from a coach etc....I'm not sure what more explanation you need but COLLEGE FOOTBALL is not and was not and should not be for this.

I don't care if NICO leads Tennesse to 3 straight NCAA Championships, paying him $8,000,000 is absolutely ridiculous and it started his senior year in high school and not even college. THAT IS F'ED UP! The argument that coaches can do it is absolutely stupid! The coach is a professional who HAS GONE TO COLLEGE AND is not enrolled in classes at the university and is paid to do a JOB! If another job is willing to pay him or her more, then because they are professionals, they have a right to barter that salary opportunity. This is the same as you can do with your career and anyone who is WORKING. The Student Athlete should come to the university because that's where they want to get their education and play for a school they love and want to be at. They should not be coming to that school because they will get paid more. That's the NFL a PAID job for professionals who have finished college and are now looking to expand on what they have learned and trained for.
IT'S COLLEGE AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL. IT'S NOT THE NFL AND PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL!


College football may survive, but as we know and love, it will never be the same unless major changes happen very quickly. If people cannot realize what coaches, and leaders, "NOT KIDS" are saying, then there is no hope, and it will die! MONEY AND GREED ARE AT THE ROOT!
The NCAA's sports model is illegal under federal law. So says the concurring SCOTUS opinion in the Alston case.

Your contention is a false dilemma frosted with non sequiturs.
 
#9
#9
Yep and dragging politicians in to fix anything, should show you the desperate attempts to repair it.
The NCAA isn't trying to repair it. They're trying to save their illegal business model.

The only way they can get their interference with NIL and their bogus transfer limits back is to get a federal Antitrust exemption.

That carries the price of paid athletes, unionization, union contracts, and the potential for strikes or other job actions.

Either way, the old NCAA business model is dead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ratvol
#10
#10
If you're just a common fan, like most of us, what exactly does any of this change for you? Whether those players are paid a lot, a little, or none at all, why is it of our concern? The players are still expected to put the work in, show up on Saturdays, and fight for 4 quarters to get a victory. Likewise, we will continue to cheer for the Vols to win, whether it be in the stadium, at a sports bar, at home, at a tailgate, etc. Absolutely NONE of this NIL stuff changes anything for us as fans. What happens Sunday to Friday I couldn't care less. Now, if you're a big money donor, have a kid who's a college athlete, or are somehow involved in the program directly, that's another conversation. But for the common fan, why do we need to concern ourselves with it?

I am F A R more aggravated at the transfer portal than I am NIL. That DOES affect me as a fan because, kind of like "one and done" with college basketball, the transfer portal has basically turned college football into minor league baseball. The names and faces are now on such a rotation, how can you ever endear yourself to any player when they might be gone the next year? And yes, I say this knowing full well that UT has benefitted and will continue to benefit from it. I still don't like it!
 
Last edited:
#11
#11
The NCAA isn't trying to repair it. They're trying to save their illegal business model.

The only way they can get their interference with NIL and their bogus transfer limits back is to get a federal Antitrust exemption.

That carries the price of paid athletes, unionization, union contracts, and the potential for strikes or other job actions.

Either way, the old NCAA business model is dead.
Old model is dead but there are ways to solve this but everyone doesn’t really want to solve it, they want there way instead of win-win.

I posted this in another thread but I will say it here.

NIL is here to stay the NCAA mistake is trying to regulate instead of embracing. Embracing will fix the transfer issues but will introduce out in the open high bid pay for play. Here were my comments when I opened that thread:

The NCAA as usual continues to put its head in sand and fails to evolve.

My suggestion to NCAA is instead of trying to regulate NIL, instead of banning Pay to Play, instead of making players employees and risk falling foul of Title IX….Embrace NIL collectives to the fullest.

Let collectives negotiate out in open with players and write any thing they want in contract.

Mr Player
- You Want a guaranteed 2m a year
- You want an extra 1m bonus if you win the Heisman
- You want an extra 1k for each tackle
- you want an extra 10k for each 100 yard game

Collective
- sure, no problem but we want
- 3 year playing commitment
- Option on your fourth year of CFB if you don’t turn pro early
- If you go to another school we don’t have to pay you
- All of this is guaranteed if you play for UT and only UT
- If you don’t play for UT, we still hold your rights and you get no pay to play for scum Bama even from Bama collective.

My point is, let’s embrace NIL, make it true pay to play and take out the incentives for the constant rebidding of NIL deals and portal transfers every year.

i think embracing NIL and making it real contracts would solve some of the current problems at least for top talent.
 
#12
#12
If you're just a common fan, like most of us, what exactly does any of this change for you? Whether those players are paid a lot, a little, or none at all, why is it of our concern? The players are still expected to put the work in, show up on Saturdays, and fight for 4 quarters to get a victory. Likewise, we will continue to cheer for the Vols to win, whether it be in the stadium, at a sports bar, at home, at a tailgate, etc. Absolutely NONE of this NIL stuff changes anything for us as fans. What happens Sunday to Friday I couldn't care less. Now, if you're a big money donor, have a kid who's a college athlete, or are somehow involved in the program directly, that's another conversation. But for the common fan, why do we need to concern ourselves with it?

I am F A R more aggravated at the transfer portal than I am NIL. That DOES affect me as a fan because, kind of like "one and done" with college basketball, the transfer portal has basically turned college football into minor league baseball. The names and faces are now on such a rotation, how can you ever endear yourself to any player when they might be gone the next year? And yes, I say this knowing full well that UT has benefitted and will continue to benefit from it. I still don't like it!
I agree wholly with your first point.

I respectfully disagree with the second. I don't care what the name on the back of the orange jersey says, as long as the athletes play well and give their all for Tennessee while they are at UT.
 
#13
#13
Old model is dead but there are ways to solve this but everyone doesn’t really want to solve it, they want there way instead of win-win.

I posted this in another thread but I will say it here.

NIL is here to stay the NCAA mistake is trying to regulate instead of embracing. Embracing will fix the transfer issues but will introduce out in the open high bid pay for play. Here were my comments when I opened that thread:

The NCAA as usual continues to put its head in sand and fails to evolve.

My suggestion to NCAA is instead of trying to regulate NIL, instead of banning Pay to Play, instead of making players employees and risk falling foul of Title IX….Embrace NIL collectives to the fullest.

Let collectives negotiate out in open with players and write any thing they want in contract.

Mr Player
- You Want a guaranteed 2m a year
- You want an extra 1m bonus if you win the Heisman
- You want an extra 1k for each tackle
- you want an extra 10k for each 100 yard game

Collective
- sure, no problem but we want
- 3 year playing commitment
- Option on your fourth year of CFB if you don’t turn pro early
- If you go to another school we don’t have to pay you
- All of this is guaranteed if you play for UT and only UT
- If you don’t play for UT, we still hold your rights and you get no pay to play for scum Bama even from Bama collective.

My point is, let’s embrace NIL, make it true pay to play and take out the incentives for the constant rebidding of NIL deals and portal transfers every year.

i think embracing NIL and making it real contracts would solve some of the current problems at least for top talent.

You are conflating two different things. NIL isn't pay to play. It won't ever be, unless the schools actually start their own collectives.
That would be silly, since they found just out the athletes on salary and make them employees.

You are still conflating two very different things. Your "solution" won't solve anything, because it a) is in unnecessary and b) it counts on a situation that doesn't exist, and that can't.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KoachKrab127
#14
#14
I agree wholly with your first point.

I respectfully disagree with the second. I don't care what the name on the back of the orange jersey says, as long as the athletes play well and give their all for Tennessee while they are at UT.
I understand and you're not wrong. I will do the same as you. The point I guess I was trying to make is, unlike NIL, the transfer portal does alter the fan experience in the sense that, part of the experience is getting to "know" these players for 3-4 years and endearing yourself to a lot of them. The transfer portal threatens that aspect of the college sports fan experience. Look at somebody like Eric Berry. He's a Vol treasure! A real folk hero of Knoxville. Now imagine him playing in the portal era and transferring after his freshman year. All those memories would've been robbed from our fanbase and he would not be remembered the same way. Imagine Peyton doing the same. Or Al Wilson. Or Juan Jennings! It just wouldn't be the same.
 
#15
#15
I understand and you're not wrong. I will do the same as you. The point I guess I was trying to make is, unlike NIL, the transfer portal does alter the fan experience in the sense that, part of the experience is getting to "know" these players for 3-4 years and endearing yourself to a lot of them. The transfer portal threatens that aspect of the college sports fan experience. Look at somebody like Eric Berry. He's a Vol treasure! A real folk hero of Knoxville. Now imagine him playing in the portal era and transferring after his freshman year. All those memories would've been robbed from our fanbase and he would not be remembered the same way. Imagine Peyton doing the same. Or Al Wilson. Or Juan Jennings! It just wouldn't be the same.
Like Nico isn't well known after starting a single game?
 
#16
#16
Like Nico isn't well known after starting a single game?
The difference is Nico is popular for what everybody HOPES he does here. The other players are LOVED because of what they DID do here! But let's not get it twisted, nobody is putting Nico on the same pedistal as Peyton or Eric Berry. Not yet at least. But what if he has a great season this year and then decides "adios"! I'm going to USC! Do you honestly think anyone will put him in the same company as those other VFL's?
 
Last edited:
#17
#17
You are conflating two different things. NIL isn't pay to play. It won't ever be, unless the schools actually start their own collectives.
That would be silly, since they found just out the athletes on salary and make them employees.

You are still conflating two very different things. Your "solution" won't solve anything, because it a) is in unnecessary and b) it counts on a situation that doesn't exist, and that can't.
We will have to agree to disagree.

For me…. if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it is a duck
 
#18
#18
The difference is Nico is popular for what everybody HOPES he does here. The other players are LOVED because of what they DID do here! But let's not get it twisted, nobody is putting Nico on the same pedistal as Peyton or Eric Berry. Not yet at least. But what if he has a great season this year and then decides "adios"! I'm going to USC! Do you honestly think anyone will put him in the same company as those other VFL's?
Not me. I like Nico because of what he's already done...a pasting if the BIG runner up.
 
#20
#20
Businesses under utilize the marketing possibilities of NIL. It’s a new, great opportunity for all of us to take advantage of.
I’ve been able to create so many leads with NIL events I’ve put together. If you learn to work the system (agents), you can absolutely get a solid ROI.
 
  • Like
Reactions: S.C. OrangeMan
#21
#21
We will have to agree to disagree.

For me…. if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it is a duck
Legally the two things are not the same.

What you said us like claiming that Patrick Mahomes' salary from the Chiefs and his NIL endorsement money from State Farm are the same thing. They clearly are not.

Conflating the two things makes the issues seem more complicated than they actually are. In reality, it's pretty simple, and it's just bad.

As for transfer rules, the NCAA got hit with an injunction in the West Virginia case. That injunction prohibits the NCAA from interfering in free transfers of student athletes in the same way that there are no limits on any other student changing schools.

Anyone that has ever changed jobs that complains about the transfer portal is being more than a little hypocritical.
 
#22
#22
Legally the two things are not the same.

What you said us like claiming that Patrick Mahomes' salary from the Chiefs and his NIL endorsement money from State Farm are the same thing. They clearly are not.

Conflating the two things makes the issues seem more complicated than they actually are. In reality, it's pretty simple, and it's just bad.

As for transfer rules, the NCAA got hit with an injunction in the West Virginia case. That injunction prohibits the NCAA from interfering in free transfers of student athletes in the same way that there are no limits on any other student changing schools.

Anyone that has ever changed jobs that complains about the transfer portal is being more than a little hypocritical.
Understand they are different. I get your point.

But allowing the collectives to write contracts with performance bonuses and terms solves a lot of problems. For those that say it creates problems for those that cannot bid, those problems have always been here. Schools like Bama and tOSU have always gotten away with paying and never got prosecuted. At least out in the open all pay is legal levels a lot of the field.

People may not like it but it keeps the employee and Title IX problems off the table and solves transfer portals.

It will take embracing some really off the wall ideas to solve the problem now. Trying to make tweaks to existing models is fruitless play.
 
#23
#23
I agree wholly with your first point.

I respectfully disagree with the second. I don't care what the name on the back of the orange jersey says, as long as the athletes play well and give their all for Tennessee while they are at UT.

A big part of being a fan of college sports is following the building of a program and the players that grow with the program, set the example, and continue to pass it on to the next group coming through, and who return to support the program, ala, Peyton, Al Wilson, Grant Williams, etc.

Without that there is no such thing as VFL's, who mean a lot to those of us who have 'bled orange' for most of their lives. That clearly doesn't mean anything to you, for whom 'rooting for the jersey' is enough, and maybe this sounds to you like sentimental tripe, but it cuts the heart out of a lot that made college sports such an essential part of many of our lives.
 
#24
#24
Understand they are different. I get your point.

But allowing the collectives to write contracts with performance bonuses and terms solves a lot of problems. For those that say it creates problems for those that cannot bid, those problems have always been here. Schools like Bama and tOSU have always gotten away with paying and never got prosecuted. At least out in the open all pay is legal levels a lot of the field.

People may not like it but it keeps the employee and Title IX problems off the table and solves transfer portals.

It will take embracing some really off the wall ideas to solve the problem now. Trying to make tweaks to existing models is fruitless play.
No it doesn't. That's how collectives lose the best athletes to other collectives with less onerous contract obligations.
 
#25
#25
A big part of being a fan of college sports is following the building of a program and the players that grow with the program, set the example, and continue to pass it on to the next group coming through, and who return to support the program, ala, Peyton, Al Wilson, Grant Williams, etc.

Without that there is no such thing as VFL's, who mean a lot to those of us who have 'bled orange' for most of their lives. That clearly doesn't mean anything to you, for whom 'rooting for the jersey' is enough, and maybe this sounds to you like sentimental tripe, but it cuts the heart out of a lot that made college sports such an essential part of many of our lives.
It dies t mean anything to me???

That's absolute bunk. My entire point is that it's about the TEAM, not the individuals.

VFL doesn't mean "Peyton Manning for life" or "Reggie White for life".

I like to watch college football and I'm a lifelong Vol fan. I was a season ticket holder for more that 20 years until I moved too far away to regularly make game weekends.

However, I don't live and die over what any individual does in a stadium.

I bet you can't name 10 players on the Michigan 2023-2024 natty team, but I bet you knew that Michigan won it.
 
Last edited:

VN Store



Back
Top