Lady Vols Softball

peachstatevolgirl

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Anybody else think they juiced the radar somewhat, maybe for TV? I hate to think that, but every other tv broadcast/WCWS, I swear the average speed has been high 60s, not consistently 70+. I remember a few years ago, Paige Lowary came out of the bullpen in the title game and hit 74 her first pitch. It was a huge to-do... Now most of these pitchers are throwing 70 consistently? Fouts threw 74 consistently? Has the game really evolved that much? 🤯
 
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jp1

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Anybody else think they juiced the radar somewhat, maybe for TV? I hate to think that, but every other tv broadcast/WCWS, I swear the average speed has been high 60s, not consistently 70+. I remember a few years ago, Paige Lowary came out of the bullpen in the title game and hit 74 her first pitch. It was a huge to-do... Now most of these pitchers are throwing 70 consistently? Fouts threw 74 consistently? Has the game really evolved that much? 🤯
Without a doubt the radar is juiced, although the game has certainly evolved.
 

volman128

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Anybody else think they juiced the radar somewhat, maybe for TV? I hate to think that, but every other tv broadcast/WCWS, I swear the average speed has been high 60s, not consistently 70+. I remember a few years ago, Paige Lowary came out of the bullpen in the title game and hit 74 her first pitch. It was a huge to-do... Now most of these pitchers are throwing 70 consistently? Fouts threw 74 consistently? Has the game really evolved that much? 🤯
Yes, definitely. Fouts throws hard but not THAT hard consistently. It also shows Arnold consistently throwing in the high 60s which she doesn't do.
 

volman128

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There is certainly a rule defined strike zone, although I agree the zone is subjective depending on the umpire. You seem to be missing my point though.
I understand your point just fine. The fact that I don't agree doesn't mean I'm missing it, but thanks for patronizing me anyway. MY point was that, despite what the 'rules' might say, a ball in the river is called a strike a majority of the time in softball. I prefer a larger zone. If I wanted to watch a sport with a tiny strikezone I'd be watching MLB games.
 

briancrice

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Sounds lazy to me. UGA is a plum coaching position, would attract a lot of highly-qualified, big-name candidates.
I think you would be surprised. Georgia does not have the financial and resource support for non-revenue sports that other schools in the SEC have. If it isn't football, tennis or gymnastics, the coaches are scratching and clawing for everything they can get.

They are, as of this year, the only softball program in the SEC that does not charge admission to their games (postseason excluded). Though I actually like the accommodations from a radio booth standpoint, their stadium is exactly as it was when the place was built in 2003. I can tell you that from a gameday staffing and event management standpoint, it is the most difficult place we travel on the road. Places like ETSU and Coastal Carolina have far more organized game protocols than Georgia does.

When they travel, they do not have the same experience that other schools have from an accommodations standpoint. We make fun of their non-conference schedule every year, but the reality is that wasn't Lu's choice, the UGA administration limits them to one non-conference road trip every year. They can do some one-night bus trips in season, and have gone to places like Clemson and Georgia Southern for those, but even those are rare.

Gerry Glasco would love to have the job, but I doubt they call. There is a strong desire on their campus to hire a female candidate.


I think the deal with him is the same across multiple sports at Georgia--and womens basketball specifically comes to mind. Why can they not keep more of these kids at home/who is the person to make that happen and has he had enough time as an assistant to show he can be that person.
The answer to both of these questions is the same, in my mind. Positions at Georgia do not draw the pool of candidates that you would expect them to because of the resource allocation, and that reflects back when in-state prospects take visits there and then visit literally any other SEC school.

You're right, I've said it for years, between the proximity to talent-rich areas and the in-state tuition assistance available to Georgia residents that helps in equivalency sports, there is no reason that Georgia shouldn't be dominant in every sport. Yet, they are slightly above average across the board.
 
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Teeman

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Just noticed this, after I had posted above. My daughter played with Cheyenne with the Frost Falcons 00 for many years. She is by far the best athlete I've ever seen first hand, and by far the fastest kid I've seen in 10 years of softball. Great kid too.

And I'll add, that neither one was interested in Tennessee because of the coaching staff.
Kalei Harding didn't get much attention from the UT coaching staff. And you're right. The feeling was mutual. Congrats to her on a monster night. Go Noles.
 

WVU05UT09

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When they travel, they do not have the same experience that other schools have from an accommodations standpoint. We make fun of their non-conference schedule every year, but the reality is that wasn't Lu's choice, the UGA administration limits them to one non-conference road trip every year. They can do some one-night bus trips in season, and have gone to places like Clemson and Georgia Southern for those, but even those are rare.
If that protcol stays the same they can forget virtually any big splash national candidate.
 

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