What would rules enforcement look like once the NCAA is out of the picture?

#1

ptcarter

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#1
NIL “Now It’s Legal”. As much as we don’t like the NCAA tactics, there is a need for rules enforcement and punishment going downstream. What is that gonna look like?

Let’s say they make a college football general manager like the NFL, What if they put the old Bama grandad GOAT Nick Saban in that position. My analogy is Kirk Herbstreit calling an Ohio State came. He’s neutral, right?

For college football care needs to be taken at this point to get it right. It’s like the founding fathers after the revolutionary war. Whatever path is forged, we will be stuck with it for a long time. NCAA had a needed purpose. Their justice wasn’t consistent though and here we are.
 
#3
#3
NIL “Now It’s Legal”. As much as we don’t like the NCAA tactics, there is a need for rules enforcement and punishment going downstream. What is that gonna look like?

Let’s say they make a college football general manager like the NFL, What if they put the old Bama grandad GOAT Nick Saban in that position. My analogy is Kirk Herbstreit calling an Ohio State came. He’s neutral, right?

For college football care needs to be taken at this point to get it right. It’s like the founding fathers after the revolutionary war. Whatever path is forged, we will be stuck with it for a long time. NCAA had a needed purpose. Their justice wasn’t consistent though and here we are.
I think everybody wants a oversight committee. I want it too be fair and upfront and organized, I think that is what most teams in the sec and power 5 want. The NCAA has just gotten greedy and more interested in power and money than being a truly fair and organized governing body. GBO
 
#4
#4
There will be a committee made up of the P5 conference commisioners, the G5 commisioners, and 3 or 4 others to make it an odd number when.including the commissioner.

The commissioner needs to come from outside the realm of college sports with no real ties or affiliations to any one institution.
While their job will be day to day and enforcement, his or her vote will only count as 1 vote on the committee.

The committee will meet to set doctrine, rules, and guidelines as well as rule on I stances where the rules were broken or need clarity.
 
#5
#5
images
 
#6
#6
This is why I'm not itching for the NCAA to completely disappear. I'm not certain the schools can form another "student-athlete" model organization legally.

Per Justice Kavanaugh:
"Nowhere else in America can businesses get away with agreeing not to pay their workers a fair market rate on the theory that their product is defined by not paying their workers a fair market rate. And under ordinary principles of antitrust law, it is not evident why college sports should be any different.

The NCAA is not above the law."

I'm not certain another non-profit organization can be formed using illegal business practices. With the NCAA gone, I'm afraid amateur college sports is also gone.
 
#9
#9
Everything from this point forward should be organized with an eye toward the players becoming employees rather than students. Making the players employees solves the transfer portal, solves the eligibility issues, eliminates the majority of the resources consumed with oversight programs, and it neuters the chaos of the NIL situation. In short, that change would address almost every "rules enforcement" issue that exists.

Every issue college football and basketball faces right now stems from the tension between those who want to retain some degree of the student-athlete concept, and those who want the sport professionalized. The law all the way to the Supreme Court is not with the former, and the latter are going to get their way. And if they don't at first, they'll take it to court until they do. Time to acknowledge that reality and truly get ahead of it. Whatever oversight the Power 2 create must be oriented toward converting the players into regular employees. Anything else they might do would just wasting time and resources putting off the inevitable.
 
#10
#10
Everything from this point forward should be organized with an eye toward the players becoming employees rather than students. Making the players employees solves the transfer portal, solves the eligibility issues, eliminates the majority of the resources consumed with oversight programs, and it neuters the chaos of the NIL situation. In short, that change would address almost every "rules enforcement" issue that exists.

Every issue college football and basketball faces right now stems from the tension between those who want to retain some degree of the student-athlete concept, and those who want the sport professionalized. The law all the way to the Supreme Court is not with the former, and the latter are going to get their way. And if they don't at first, they'll take it to court until they do. Time to acknowledge that reality and truly get ahead of it. Whatever oversight the Power 2 create must be oriented toward converting the players into regular employees. Anything else they might do would just wasting time and resources putting off the inevitable.
I hate to admit it, but you're right.
I fear the o ly way out of this mess is to make and treat the athlete like an employee.

I wish there was a balance between keeping the amateur, student athlete, aspect and the full blown we are paying out right professional.
 
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#11
#11
....solves the transfer portal....
....neuters the chaos of the NIL situation....
The portal? You bought into the propaganda that Bama losing players is a national crisis. Don't be so gullible. Why you hatin' Hendon Hooker, Bru McCoy, Campbell and Heard? Ever heard of a guy named Knecht?

NIL? It is blowing up the old bag-game and Dodge Charger era where deliberately crooked unequal enforcement by the NCAA made a mockery of fair competition. It's beautiful. Very happy to beat out Saban for Nico!
 
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#12
#12
I don't think the NCAA will go away. I think it will be remade into some kind of functioning body that does what the member schools want; a truly neutral entity that has specific rules it governs by.
 
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#14
#14
I am frankly against any rules, the reasoning is the rules are too impossible to enforce anyways and always have been. Any enforcement would end up being selective and favor certain programs.
 
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#15
#15
NIL “Now It’s Legal”. As much as we don’t like the NCAA tactics, there is a need for rules enforcement and punishment going downstream. What is that gonna look like?

Let’s say they make a college football general manager like the NFL, What if they put the old Bama grandad GOAT Nick Saban in that position. My analogy is Kirk Herbstreit calling an Ohio State came. He’s neutral, right?

For college football care needs to be taken at this point to get it right. It’s like the founding fathers after the revolutionary war. Whatever path is forged, we will be stuck with it for a long time. NCAA had a needed purpose. Their justice wasn’t consistent though and here we are.
It will be done just like every other business deal is done, with a contract stating all the terms signed by all parties. Groups are not going to throw big money around and then worry about the actions of an 18 year-old, they need everything on paper. No more recruiting commitments, they will be recruiting contracts.
 
#16
#16
NIL “Now It’s Legal”. As much as we don’t like the NCAA tactics, there is a need for rules enforcement and punishment going downstream. What is that gonna look like?

Let’s say they make a college football general manager like the NFL, What if they put the old Bama grandad GOAT Nick Saban in that position. My analogy is Kirk Herbstreit calling an Ohio State came. He’s neutral, right?

For college football care needs to be taken at this point to get it right. It’s like the founding fathers after the revolutionary war. Whatever path is forged, we will be stuck with it for a long time. NCAA had a needed purpose. Their justice wasn’t consistent though and here we are.
I don’t think the NCAA is going anywhere any time soon. Sometimes power moves are made to look as though it is an effort to advance when in reality, they are just trying to hold ground. That said, I don’t think the NCAA anticipated being sued. I think what happens or should happen is that the NCAA is told to back off. Perhaps they are fined a little bit to cover court costs, and minor damages, but they aren’t suddenly responsible for millions of dollars. I think they get slapped hard on the wrists and the NCCAA goes through restructuring and people are fired in order to save the jobs of others’. In the future the NCAA runs a tighter ship.
 
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#17
#17
Your new governing body?

 
#18
#18
Why have a NCAA and conference layer of oversight anyway? Dump the NCAA and leave it to conferences to manage oversight. If you have a conference not providing fair oversight, it won't last long, institutions as they should would move to conferences which are providing fair oversight.
 
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#19
#19
This is why I'm not itching for the NCAA to completely disappear. I'm not certain the schools can form another "student-athlete" model organization legally.

Per Justice Kavanaugh:
"Nowhere else in America can businesses get away with agreeing not to pay their workers a fair market rate on the theory that their product is defined by not paying their workers a fair market rate. And under ordinary principles of antitrust law, it is not evident why college sports should be any different.

The NCAA is not above the law."

I'm not certain another non-profit organization can be formed using illegal business practices. With the NCAA gone, I'm afraid amateur college sports is also gone.

Kavanaugh is crazy. Since when is the NCAA/College Football a conventional business? It's not in any way a conventional business. These are publc universities. The players are full-tiime students--fact--not "workers." And they are getting "paid" in the form of a free college scholarship--free tuition, housing, food, medical care, tutoring, counseling and the coaching that gives some the opportunity to play pro football. That's all probably worth $50K a year. So this notion that the players aren't paid is abject nonsense. Beyond that, a big chunk of football revenue is used to subsidize 15/20 other sports that lose money and will always lose money. What conventional businesses invest millions annually in endeavors that are guaranteed to lose money? None. If college football were a real business and the student-athletes were actually "workers," then they wouldn't be getting help from professional coaches every day.

College football has been around for 100 years. Games have been televised for 60 years. The idea of paying student-athletes rarely if ever came up in the past. But, now, suddenly, we have a couple of judges who purport to be aghast that full-time student-athletes are not getting paychecks in addition to their free college education? What's really happened is that this myth has arisen that because CFB generates so much money, people must be getting rich at the expense of the players. Nobody is getting rich but the head coaches--who are certainly overpaid. But that's it. And there's been a lot of social-justice blather around it too.

Somebody will have to decide who's in charge: The universities and the NCAA or the student-athletes. We seem in this moment of wanting to indulge the kids, in my view.

As for the NCAA: Fans like to bash the NCAA mainly because they don't like their programs being investigated and get their backs up. It's all nonsense. In the years ahead, whether it's the NCAA or some other entitly, there will be rules, there will be enforcement mechanisms--and there will be crazy fans who get their undies in a knot if their program runs afoul of the rules and is investigated or sanctioned. Waaaa!

The NCAA is a member organization: UT and every other university constitutes the NCAA. So one would think that the NCAA and the conference leaders would come together--as I assume they do now--and hash out all these issues and try to keep some common sense and integrity amid the chaotic mess that is still supposed to be COLLEGE football. One big problem is that most fans, especially in certain regions, don't seem to relate very well to the college part of all this.
 
#21
#21
Why have a NCAA and conference layer of oversight anyway? Dump the NCAA and leave it to conferences to manage oversight. If you have a conference not providing fair oversight, it won't last long, institutions as they should would move to conferences which are providing fair oversight.

This makes no sense. If by oversight you mean rules enforcement, then you can't leave it to individual conferences because each would enforce rules differently--some more strictly than others. Some might let things go if they thought the conference would suffer if certain member programs were sanctioned. There has to be an independent governing body that works closely with the conferences and that has power. No matter who governs the sport, fans will bitch and whine when their programs get into trouble. That's a given.
 
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#22
#22
It will be the same thing IF the universities/conferences form it. Which is extremely likely. The main difference is your rivals will have 10x more power. Instead of 300+ disinterested universities making the rules and handing down punishments, it will be a dozen of your closest rivals.


It will still be the universities controlling the players at all costs.

Just look at yesterday's article on Sankey. He is THE biggest supporter of rolling back NIL and wants to go back to owning the players. That is what the universities want, if they can get away with it. And now he's spearheading this "committee"...🤔

The universities need to step aside and give the players a CBA and sellnoff their rights to a private org that will actually work with the players.
 
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#23
#23
I don't think the NCAA will go away. I think it will be remade into some kind of functioning body that does what the member schools want; a truly neutral entity that has specific rules it governs by.
so...what it has been all along?

The NCAA is the member schools and it does exactly what they vote for. The member schools also hand down punishments.

It will just be more concentrated by the Bamas and UGAs if they cut away from the other 300+ schools. Same shiz, new day.

Dump the schools. Empower the players.
 
#24
#24
Kavanaugh is crazy. Since when is the NCAA/College Football a conventional business? It's not in any way a conventional business. These are publc universities. The players are full-tiime students--fact--not "workers." And they are getting "paid" in the form of a free college scholarship--free tuition, housing, food, medical care, tutoring, counseling and the coaching that gives some the opportunity to play pro football. That's all probably worth $50K a year. So this notion that the players aren't paid is abject nonsense. Beyond that, a big chunk of football revenue is used to subsidize 15/20 other sports that lose money and will always lose money. What conventional businesses invest millions annually in endeavors that are guaranteed to lose money? None. If college football were a real business and the student-athletes were actually "workers," then they wouldn't be getting help from professional coaches every day.

College football has been around for 100 years. Games have been televised for 60 years. The idea of paying student-athletes rarely if ever came up in the past. But, now, suddenly, we have a couple of judges who purport to be aghast that full-time student-athletes are not getting paychecks in addition to their free college education? What's really happened is that this myth has arisen that because CFB generates so much money, people must be getting rich at the expense of the players. Nobody is getting rich but the head coaches--who are certainly overpaid. But that's it. And there's been a lot of social-justice blather around it too.

Somebody will have to decide who's in charge: The universities and the NCAA or the student-athletes. We seem in this moment of wanting to indulge the kids, in my view.

As for the NCAA: Fans like to bash the NCAA mainly because they don't like their programs being investigated and get their backs up. It's all nonsense. In the years ahead, whether it's the NCAA or some other entitly, there will be rules, there will be enforcement mechanisms--and there will be crazy fans who get their undies in a knot if their program runs afoul of the rules and is investigated or sanctioned. Waaaa!

The NCAA is a member organization: UT and every other university constitutes the NCAA. So one would think that the NCAA and the conference leaders would come together--as I assume they do now--and hash out all these issues and try to keep some common sense and integrity amid the chaotic mess that is still supposed to be COLLEGE football. One big problem is that most fans, especially in certain regions, don't seem to relate very well to the college part of all this.
You rant and NEVER address players being paid under the table for generations.

I've said: the scholarship is valuable but the players are more valuable than just the scholarship. It's a fact. How do I know that? The illegal payments before and the NIL payments now.

Again, Kavanaugh had nine other Supreme Court Justices who could, should, and would "push back" on his assertion the players are employees and the NCAA is in violation of Antitrust Law.

The Alston ruling establishes precedent legally so if Justices disagreed, it's their job to show their legal reasoning and opinion. They often do, as Kavanaugh did, and VERY often have completely different takes. 9-0 in Alston and not a SINGLE other opinion than Gorsuch, writing the official decision, and Kavanaugh tearing into the NCAA. Kavanaugh isn't crazy and his fellow Justices aren't either.

Multiple law reviews and attorneys have weighed in saying: it's just a matter of time before the courts rule the players are employees.

I hope it drags out in the courts as long as possible but the NCAA saw the they'd lost the NIL fight after Alston and within days overturned their policy on NIL.

No one has a bigger stake in avoiding NIL than the NCAA. It's destroying their business model of the "amateur student athlete" and they know it. All their attempts to limit transfers, limit NIL, and limit the slide to "players are employees" are losing in every court.

Every judge isn't crazy, my man.
 
#25
#25
NIL “Now It’s Legal”. As much as we don’t like the NCAA tactics, there is a need for rules enforcement and punishment going downstream. What is that gonna look like?

Let’s say they make a college football general manager like the NFL, What if they put the old Bama grandad GOAT Nick Saban in that position. My analogy is Kirk Herbstreit calling an Ohio State came. He’s neutral, right?

For college football care needs to be taken at this point to get it right. It’s like the founding fathers after the revolutionary war. Whatever path is forged, we will be stuck with it for a long time. NCAA had a needed purpose. Their justice wasn’t consistent though and here we are.

Like a minor league for the NFL.
 

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