Tracing your ancestry

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I do the Find-a-grave thing for people. I went to a questionable place to take a few pictures. I'm not well versed in that writing. I thought it may be Hebrew or Muslim, and thought you may know.
It’s Hebrew but the spellin is off from what I’m used to.
Then again I read and speak Hebrew like a 5 year old. Lol
 

C1500

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It’s Hebrew but the spellin is off from what I’m used to.
Then again I read and speak Hebrew like a 5 year old. Lol
Maybe It's like the Japanese tattoos people get. The guy ask for it on his stone and the guy putting it on was like they will never know if its right or not. lol
 

ArdentVol

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Same here! Ancestors on Dad's side were Union, and on Mom's side they were CSA. My great-great-great grandfather (Mom's side) served in the 6th Florida Infantry, and is buried in Knoxville at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery. The unit formed in March 1862, and he was dead by early August...I'm glad he and my great^3 grandmother got 'acquainted' in the conjugal sense prior to him joining up, or else I wouldn't exist.
same here
dad's famly were from knoxville and I was left his revolver
mom's were from georgia .... family lorehas it that sherman billeted in their home before reaching atlanta
 
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C1500

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The gravestones of Pvt Christopher C. Long, and Pvt John C. Long. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. These are my 4th great-granduncles. They served in Co. C, 2nd Tennessee Infantry and was Captured in Rogersville, TN, on November 6, 1863, and killed on June 3, 1864.

imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-y7tMdfJIof4s.jpg
 
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C1500

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My dad wants to map out a family tree, is there a good easy program anybody uses that you could recommend?
Ancestry.com is the easiest one I have used. It's a bit pricey if you get the membership to view records. Family tree is another one, but I don't like the interface as much.
 
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Firebirdparts

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My granny had this story about the census taker who didn’t want to cross the creek and so they hollered back and forth and not getting the message entirely clear she gave the cows names instead of the children’s names. Not that it was recorded that way, I think in the early 1800s around here the census takers just had no idea where people might be living. Mostly empty country.
 

Toujours Pret

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My granny had this story about the census taker who didn’t want to cross the creek and so they hollered back and forth and not getting the message entirely clear she gave the cows names instead of the children’s names. Not that it was recorded that way, I think in the early 1800s around here the census takers just had no idea where people might be living. Mostly empty country.
I've got a transcribed copy of a Canadian census from about 1875 somewhere within my family's stuff on it. Much closer to William the Conquerors "Grand List" than a modern census. Number of cows, mules, sheep, chickens etc in addition to the names and ages of everyone.

They came before the potato famine and my wing branched over to Michigan, while many stayed on the farm belt of southern Ontario.

Didnt know any of this til 23 and Me when a distant relative and I touched base. Guy gave me more research in one email than I could've done in years on that side of my family
 

C1500

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Nightmare scenario...caller ID from Wisconsin (Kentucky, GA...take your pick of spring breaks coeds)..... answer the phone ..".Dad?"
Guys daughter come home and had took a test along and found and sister and brother. He had went on a trip and had a fun night out that he didn't tell his wife about.
 

C1500

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Anyone know how to check into old Supreme Court cases? My 3rd great-grandfather worked for the railroad in Roane County and was run over. I found this while looking in some family stuff.

Bill had worked for the railroad for several years doing various jobs of working in leather and ironworks. One night in 1905 as he was walking home from work he was going through the tunnels between Harriman and Oakdale a train came along apparently he didn't hear the whistle blowing and there was no place for him to go once he saw it. He was killed instantly according to doctors reports. When it got late g-grandma Nancy got her oil lantern, telling her oldest children to take care of the others then went out to search. After a long walk she came upon the train with several men standing around talking & trying to keep her away. She fought her way through and held his body until they came to move him. Needless to say that would be devastating. She sued the railroad & fought they for several years. She eventually took it to the Supreme Court but she finally won the case.
He left a widow with eight children; Eddie, Bill, Harrison, Walter, Lawrence, Rosa, Mae & Minnie.

How true it is I have no clue. I don't know if they would mean the TN Supreme Court or the U.S. Supreme Court I looked in to some old cases, but couldn't really nail down anything
 

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