Stanford cancels 11 sports.

#3

VA_VOLFAN

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#3
Womens basketball is not a priority for most schools. Football and men's basketball are only sports that really bring in money for almost every school as far as I know
But it’s one way to help balance with title 9... I can almost guarantee as long as there is a football team at the school there will be a ladies b-ball, volleyball, along with a track team.
 
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#8

Sam I Am

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#8
My crystal ball says:

1. NCAA football season cancelled. Massive TV contract payments to conferences go away. Season tix sales go away.
2. AD bugets get hammered.
3. Massive cuts to Administration staff, training, coaches, nutrition, etc.
4. Each school has to eliminate 4-5 sports - minimum. (UT will kill golf, rowing and tennis) If problem is long lasting: Track and Field and Volleyball would be next.
5. Coaches salaries will be cut by 50%-70% across the board.
6 The day of reckoning for the NCAA and these absurd salaries, and crazy ticket prices has arrived.

Discuss among yourselves.....
I posted this on March 30, 2020. Caught alot of flack for it. But, not too much lately.
 
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#10

CAVPUT

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#10
Womens basketball is not a priority for most schools. Football and men's basketball are only sports that really bring in money for almost every school as far as I know
Just a reality check for those who don't recognize that football is the golden goose. You don't rock the boat when it comes to football. Football takes a hit and you can kiss all those women's sports goodbye as well...title IX be damned.
 
#12

GlockVol

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#12
How does all this jive with Title IX. I understand that UT added rowing years ago to help bring women's scholarships totals up due to imbalance caused by men's football.
 
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#13

Catbone

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#13
Just a reality check for those who don't recognize that football is the golden goose. You don't rock the boat when it comes to football. Football takes a hit and you can kiss all those women's sports goodbye as well...title IX be damned.
True.

Men's basketball is the largest source of the NCAA's total revenue because the NCAA tournament brings in lots of money. But even before teams reach the tournament level, they generate revenue for their schools with individual basketball games. And at these school levels, basketball takes second chair to football for total revenue generated.

In fact, football garners more revenue than the next 35 other sports combined at Division I schools. On average, football brings in $31.9 million in revenue, while men's basketball (the second-highest grossing sport) comes in a distant second at $8.1 million. For reference, women's basketball brings in $1.8 million, while rowing brings in just $932,646.
 
#16

Hoosier

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#16
Point #1 - "Stanford . . . will cut 11 of its varsity programs at the conclusion of the 2020-21 academic year" --- so, they will have those sports this year
Point #2 - "discontinued are men's and women's fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men's rowing, co-ed and women's sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men's volleyball and wrestling" --- the vast majority of schools don't have those sports in the first place --- I wonder how many schools have 36 sports? UT has 14-20, depending on how you count them.
 
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#18

volman128

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#18
Womens basketball is not a priority for most schools. Football and men's basketball are only sports that really bring in money for almost every school as far as I know
Trying to figure out WTH this post has to do with the article since WBB isn't one of the sports being cut.
 
#20

madtownvol

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#20
Stanford supported 36 varsity sports, more than double the national average. They have obviously been pushing their budget to support than many sports. They had a structural deficit, meaning that it was going to grow every year and that was before the Covid-19 disruption.

When you look at the facts surrounding this decision, I don't think it necessarily means they know that the Fall football season is done. It is just a matter that this cut was going to happen and the current disruption made it sooner than later:
An open letter to the Stanford community and the Stanford Athletics family | Stanford News
 
#21

stllvf

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#21
as can be expected during the next few months - this board (all boards) will receive interpretations of simple sporting news that will become an opportunity to express personal opinions and bias.

another topics:
The Big Ten has cancelled all non-conference football games - Indiana as an example, plays on Sept 7 and has three open weeks before the next game. loss of revenue to mid-majors will impact even more than top sports.
 
#22

Lucy

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#22
As long as Tennessee can have 5 to 8 sports everything will be fine with me. Football, baseball, basketball, womens basketball, softball, volleyball, and track and field maybe swimming would be fine with me
I would take Soccer, Golf and tennis before baseball. Baseball is a dying sport and MLB has no one to blame but themselves.
Also, 30 years from now I wonder if we will have moved away from football to soccer. I know a lot of families who will not let their sons play football. They play soccer instead
 
#23

WVU05UT09

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#23
as can be expected during the next few months - this board (all boards) will receive interpretations of simple sporting news that will become an opportunity to express personal opinions and bias.

another topics:
The Big Ten has cancelled all non-conference football games - Indiana as an example, plays on Sept 7 and has three open weeks before the next game. loss of revenue to mid-majors will impact even more than top sports.
G5 schools are f—-ed.

If football isn’t played its going to be mayday even in P5. All the other sports for the season will be cancelled. More sport reductions. Likely see mass furloughs for a calendar year as well. Not everywhere but it will happen.
 
#24

madtownvol

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#24
G5 schools are f—-ed.

If football isn’t played its going to be mayday even in P5. All the other sports for the season will be cancelled. More sport reductions. Likely see mass furloughs for a calendar year as well. Not everywhere but it will happen.
There are so many contingencies. What can be said, as 71, 000 new cases are reported, is that we likely to be deep in the throes of a massive outbreak by the time we hit early August.

Universities desperately want students on campus because they will take an even bigger financial hit if they have to go to on-line classes--which would mean big drops in enrollment and a lot of push for tuition reductions.

But facing the realities of the situation (and the risk to not only students but the older population of faculty and staff), I think most Universities will blink and cancel on-campus classes and there goes Fall sports.

If that happens, the NCAA will have to regroup and hope that football could be played as a Spring sport (Perhaps kicking off in mid-March). However, as bad as the US is doing at containing this pandemic, I am not optimistic that the Spring semester (which starts in January where we will have the flu/covid convergence) is going to be any better for hosting students on campus or major sporting events.

And really unlikely, desparation scenario - The NCAA could finally admit that, for the power 5 schools at least, football and men's b-ball athletes are really undercompensated professional athletes and they need to play to save the institution of college sports. So, they could be sequestered in bubbles like the pros and just play their slate of games to earn the television revenues.
 
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#25

WVU05UT09

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#25
There are so many contingencies. What can be said, as 71, 000 new cases are reported, is that we likely to be deep in the throes of a massive outbreak by the time we hit early August.

Universities desperately want students on campus because they will take an even bigger financial hit if they have to go to on-line classes--which would mean big drops in enrollment and a lot of push for tuition reductions.

But facing the realities of the situation (and the risk to not only students but the older population of faculty and staff), I think most Universities will blink and cancel on-campus classes and there goes Fall sports.

If that happens, the NCAA will have to regroup and hope that football could be played as a Spring sport (Perhaps kicking off in mid-March). However, as bad as the US is doing at containing this pandemic, I am not optimistic that the Spring semester (which starts in January where we will have the flu/covid convergence) is going to be any better for hosting students on campus or major sporting events.

And really unlikely, desparation scenario - The NCAA could finally admit that, for the power 5 schools at least, football and men's b-ball athletes are really undercompensated professional athletes and they need to play to save the institution of college sports. So, they could be sequestered in bubbles like the pros and just play their slate of games to earn the television revenues.[/QUOTE
Commissioners, Presidents, and ADs can posture all they want about spring football. It’s not happening.
 

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