Peyton Manning's New Bourbon Is So Legit....

#26

JohnWardForever

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2008
Messages
7,091
Likes
2,937
#26
They been making whiskey in Sweetens Cove for 200 years, good water for it filtered thru the Fort Payne seam of limestone.
This ain't it.
I was wondering if anyone on here was familiar with Sweeten's Cove! Used to drink that awesome water from the Pipe coming out of the Mountain at that roadside pullover spot. Funny how Peyton used that name. Probably learned it from Thunder Thornton.
 
#31

Gandalf

The Orange/White Wizard
Joined
Dec 7, 2012
Messages
2,673
Likes
6,358
#31
I thought the Dickel BIB was great!
I think he means the Peyton resell of the DBIB at $200 a bottle instead of the regular $35-40.

Even so, I expect if they hired a Master Distiller to blend it, that distiller is going to do something to earn that money and hopefully make it a tad different than its base - which I also suspect is the DBIB at its core. All in all I would bet its a good drink. Worth $200? Could be just for the fun of a sharing a Peyton product among friends - and I suspect that is what they are going for and why they will sell out.
 
Last edited:
#32

n_huffhines

What's it gonna cost?
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
64,708
Likes
35,550
#32
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
You sound like the wine snobs who say it has to come from Italy, Spain, or France and then pick California products in blind taste tests.
 
#33

fifties fan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2015
Messages
542
Likes
761
#33
I will look for some. Is it like Sweet Lucy?
Nope. Sweet Lucy is more like JD Honey or Drambuie. I agree with the Prichard's DB fans. Absolutely my favorite US whisky. Anybody in the Chattanooga area, Urban Stack had it in stock....you know, back when people actually ate and drank in restaurants.
 
#34

mj81870

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
22
Likes
6
#34
I was wondering if anyone on here was familiar with Sweeten's Cove! Used to drink that awesome water from the Pipe coming out of the Mountain at that roadside pullover spot. Funny how Peyton used that name. Probably learned it from Thunder Thornton.
My grandpaw used to take me there. We would fill up a couple of jugs to keep in the fridge. Rode the motorcycle by there the other day and it's still there.
 
#36

Boca Vol

Fan of #31
Lab Rat
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
23,211
Likes
14,777
#36
Tennessee whiskeys/bourbons off the top of my head:

Jack Daniel's
George Dickel
Prichard's
Collier & McKeel
Corsair
Chattanooga Whiskey
Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan's Nashville distillery)
Uncle Nearest
Pennington/Davidson Reserve
Greenbriar/Belle Meade Bourbon
Short Mountain
Tenn South
H Clark
Col. Hunter's (made by Leiper's Fork Distillery)

There are actually a good many Tennessee whiskey makers...they're not as widely distributed as the Kentucky bourbons, but in some ways, that's what makes them great. And they're not as limited by the confines of fitting the "bourbon" requirements, so they branch out and make a wider variety of interesting tastes. Corsair is the prime example of this. Their Triple Smoke, Rasputin, Ryemageddon, etc. are all very different tasting whiskeys, but all delicious in their own right.

Also, the Col. Hunter stuff, while hard to find, is fantastic. And expensive. Prichard's was my favorite whiskey from anywhere, but they hit a distribution snag...now it's hard to find and ridiculously priced if you find it.
Collier & McKeel is a nice bottle!
 
#37

VolGee4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
19,374
Likes
13,821
#37
I was wondering if anyone on here was familiar with Sweeten's Cove! Used to drink that awesome water from the Pipe coming out of the Mountain at that roadside pullover spot. Funny how Peyton used that name. Probably learned it from Thunder Thornton.
If you didn’t know, PM and Roddick also invested in the golf course there, so he knows the area.
 
Likes: Bret178
#38

LAVol1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2017
Messages
883
Likes
1,275
#38
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
I'm sorry, but you are absolutely wrong. To qualify as a bourbon, the grain mash must be at least 51% corn and stored in charred oak barrels.
 
#40

Pepe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2018
Messages
3,955
Likes
4,767
#40
could a Kentucky bourbon that is charcoal filtered by the Lincoln County method be called Tennessee Whiskey?

There are several small distillers now in Tennessee that market as bourbon.

It is just marketing hype and something that the drunk users of the products can argue about. And everyone knows that drunks argue.
But, a real Tennessee drunk argues about Lebron.
 
Last edited:
Likes: LargeOrange1
#41

Remy

A kick to the cods is my only deterrence.
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
8,215
Likes
8,035
#41
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
You're correct per all kinds of laws and even treaties bourbon can only be made in the State of Kentucky. Same for tequila, per laws and treaties, you can get all the agave planted in Unicoi County you want, distill it, and you'll not be able to market it as tequila.
 
#42

Jravol78

You ate sand ?
Joined
Aug 13, 2016
Messages
3,766
Likes
2,526
#42
Tennessee whiskeys/bourbons off the top of my head:

Jack Daniel's
George Dickel
Prichard's
Collier & McKeel
Corsair
Chattanooga Whiskey
Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan's Nashville distillery)
Uncle Nearest
Pennington/Davidson Reserve
Greenbriar/Belle Meade Bourbon
Short Mountain
Tenn South
H Clark
Col. Hunter's (made by Leiper's Fork Distillery)

There are actually a good many Tennessee whiskey makers...they're not as widely distributed as the Kentucky bourbons, but in some ways, that's what makes them great. And they're not as limited by the confines of fitting the "bourbon" requirements, so they branch out and make a wider variety of interesting tastes. Corsair is the prime example of this. Their Triple Smoke, Rasputin, Ryemageddon, etc. are all very different tasting whiskeys, but all delicious in their own right.

Also, the Col. Hunter stuff, while hard to find, is fantastic. And expensive. Prichard's was my favorite whiskey from anywhere, but they hit a distribution snag...now it's hard to find and ridiculously priced if you find it.
hey Greg ... our VFL friend who recently passed used to talk about bourbon being “aged on the way to the store”. You probably knew but his old man was sales manager of the biggest liquor distributor in the state . This saying was one of the old mans originals . 😂. Man I miss him !
 
#43

Hawkeye4588

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2017
Messages
1,127
Likes
2,394
#43
Since Tennessee, Kentucky and Canadian Whiskey are all so similar production wise I found this little snippet on redheadoakbarrels.com to explain the difference in the three:

Kentucky whiskey is commonly known as bourbon whiskey. Kentucky whiskeys need to be made of a mash that contains at least 51% corn. Corn is a sweeter grain and this adds to the flavor of this liquor. The vast majority of bourbons are aged for at least four years in new oak barrels. New barrels will age the liquor faster and impart earthy flavors into this smooth liquor.

Tennessee whiskey is recognized by United States law as a separate type of alcohol. Tennessee whiskeys are required to be a straight bourbon type of whiskey, but this liquor is not commonly referred to as bourbon. The final stage of making Tennessee whiskey involves filtering the liquor through a maple charcoal filter to give the whiskey a slightly sweeter taste. The liquor is then aged in new oak barrels.

Canadian whiskey has much less regulation and is often a blended style of whiskey. This means that multiple mashes are made out of a variety of grains and then blended to create the final product. Canadian whiskeys are often a lot lighter than American whiskeys and are very smooth. Often times, Canadian whiskey makers will add a high amount of flavorful rye grain to the mash. These liquors are often referred to as rye whiskeys, but that term can be used interchangeably with the term Canadian whiskey.
 
#44

TAF

Oh Yeah...I mean it!
Joined
Sep 11, 2007
Messages
7,277
Likes
17,425
#44
You're correct per all kinds of laws and even treaties bourbon can only be made in the State of Kentucky. Same for tequila, per laws and treaties, you can get all the agave planted in Unicoi County you want, distill it, and you'll not be able to market it as tequila.

Wrong:

find the words "only in Kentucky" below, and i'll give you $1,000

According to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau's Beverage Alcohol Manual, of Whisky (do you even know why there is no "e" in "Whisky" here?)

"Spirits distilled from a fermented mash of grain at less than 95 percent alcohol by volume (190 proof) having the taste, aroma and characteristics generally attributed to whisky and bottled at not less than 40 percent alcohol by volume (80 proof)."
"Whisky produced in the U.S. at not exceeding 80 percent alcohol by volume (160 proof) from a fermented mash of not less than 51 percent corn and stored at not more than 62.5 percent alcohol by volume (125 proof) in charred new oak containers."


I now live in Virginia...and for MANY years there is a Virginia Gentleman Bourbon Whiskey with roots back to 1934 founded on the day after the end of prohibition. Still made today in Virginia...now owned by Buffalo Trace (like almost everything else)...here is the bottle and read more here Virginia Gentleman Bourbon | Expert Reviews



And here is a link to "Tarnished Truth" Old Cavalier Bourbon which is distilled in the basement of the famous Cavalier Hotel on Virginia Beach

Old Cavalier - Tarnished Truth
 
Last edited:
#45

Frivolous

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2012
Messages
145
Likes
133
#45
Wrong:

find the words "only in Kentucky" below, and i'll give you $1,000

According to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau's Beverage Alcohol Manual, of Whisky (do you even know why there is no "e" in "Whisky" here?)

"Spirits distilled from a fermented mash of grain at less than 95 percent alcohol by volume (190 proof) having the taste, aroma and characteristics generally attributed to whisky and bottled at not less than 40 percent alcohol by volume (80 proof)."
"Whisky produced in the U.S. at not exceeding 80 percent alcohol by volume (160 proof) from a fermented mash of not less than 51 percent corn and stored at not more than 62.5 percent alcohol by volume (125 proof) in charred new oak containers."


I now live in Virginia...and for MANY years there is a Virginia Gentleman Bourbon Whiskey with roots back to 1934 founded on the day after the end of prohibition. Still made today in Virginia...now owned by Buffalo Trace (like almost everything else)...here is the bottle and read more here Virginia Gentleman Bourbon | Expert Reviews


And here is a link to "Tarnished Truth" Old Cavalier Bourbon which is distilled in the basement of the famous Cavalier Hotel on Virginia Beach

Old Cavalier - Tarnished Truth
He is right about tequila at least.... That goes back to NAFTA and now the USMCA.

You are correct about bourbon. It has to be made in the US, but not necessarily Kentucky. Another example is MGP which is one of the oldest and largest distilleries in the country and which supplies the juice for a huge (but undisclosed) number of "craft" bourbon labels. MGP is in Indiana.
 
#47

JohnWardForever

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2008
Messages
7,091
Likes
2,937
#47
Since Tennessee, Kentucky and Canadian Whiskey are all so similar production wise I found this little snippet on redheadoakbarrels.com to explain the difference in the three:

Kentucky whiskey is commonly known as bourbon whiskey. Kentucky whiskeys need to be made of a mash that contains at least 51% corn. Corn is a sweeter grain and this adds to the flavor of this liquor. The vast majority of bourbons are aged for at least four years in new oak barrels. New barrels will age the liquor faster and impart earthy flavors into this smooth liquor.

Tennessee whiskey is recognized by United States law as a separate type of alcohol. Tennessee whiskeys are required to be a straight bourbon type of whiskey, but this liquor is not commonly referred to as bourbon. The final stage of making Tennessee whiskey involves filtering the liquor through a maple charcoal filter to give the whiskey a slightly sweeter taste. The liquor is then aged in new oak barrels.

Canadian whiskey has much less regulation and is often a blended style of whiskey. This means that multiple mashes are made out of a variety of grains and then blended to create the final product. Canadian whiskeys are often a lot lighter than American whiskeys and are very smooth. Often times, Canadian whiskey makers will add a high amount of flavorful rye grain to the mash. These liquors are often referred to as rye whiskeys, but that term can be used interchangeably with the term Canadian whiskey.
Jack Daniels = Sour Mash. Not Bourbon.
 
#48

tnutater

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
397
Likes
912
#48
Amazing, out of all the quaint areas --------------Where I grew up. You can bet that Peyton is Likely invested in The Highlands too, Probably owns a Home there.
If you grew up there you remember that the golf course floods. Still does.

Corn won't grow at all on Rocky Top.
Won't grow on creek bottom land either.
 
Last edited:

VN Store




Sponsors
 

Top