Peyton Manning's New Bourbon Is So Legit....

#1

volmanbill

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#1
Only fourteen thousand bottles of Sweetens Cove bourbon will be available to Tennessee residents starting May 26 via pre-sale. By June, the $200 product is expected to surface in Georgia and other markets. I’ve already tried it and found it quite good, with a rich, peanut-y aroma and a mature flavor profile, not unexpectedly heavy on the oak. At a proof of 102.18, this is definitely a bourbon meant for connoisseurs, not just Peyton fan-boys.
Peyton Manning Talks New Bourbon for Sweetens Cove and Charity Golf Game
 
#5

TAF

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#5
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
You OBVIOUSLY don't know the truth about Bourbons...

I highly recommend you educate yourself by watching THIS:

Home - NEAT
 
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#6

BigOrangeMojo

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#6
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
Well TN and Peyton owned KY on the football field....
 
#7

golfballs

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#7
"13-year-old Tennessee bourbon "

I'm sorry. I love Tennessee. I consider it home even though I live in Oklahoma. And I'd like a taste of the Sweetens Cove... But Bourbon is a Kentucky product.

Flame away. But I'm not wrong.
”Tennessee whiskey” is bourbon that is charcoal filtered
 
#9

tnutater

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#9
”Tennessee whiskey” is bourbon that is charcoal filtered
Both right and wrong. The Tennessee Legislators say Tennesse Whiskey must use the Lincoln County method. Kentucky Legislators insist bourbon can only be made instate. Distillers go to extreme measures to market their brands. Grain mixtures between the two vary little.
 
#11

golfballs

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Both right and wrong. The Tennessee Legislators say Tennesse Whiskey must use the Lincoln County method. Kentucky Legislators insist bourbon can only be made instate. Distillers go to extreme measures to market their brands. Grain mixtures between the two vary little.
I don’t live in Kentucky so I don’t care what Kentucky legislators think. Nobody else does either
 
#16

tnutater

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#16
could a Kentucky bourbon that is charcoal filtered by the Lincoln County method be called Tennessee Whiskey?

There are several small distillers now in Tennessee that market as bourbon.

It is just marketing hype and something that the drunk users of the products can argue about. And everyone knows that drunks argue.
 
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#17

GregAmsler

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#17
could a Kentucky bourbon that is charcoal filtered by the Lincoln County method be called Tennessee Whiskey?

There are several small distillers now in Tennessee that market as bourbon.

It is just marketing hype and something that the drunk users of the products can argue about. And everyone knows that drunks argue.
Tennessee whiskeys/bourbons off the top of my head:

Jack Daniel's
George Dickel
Prichard's
Collier & McKeel
Corsair
Chattanooga Whiskey
Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan's Nashville distillery)
Uncle Nearest
Pennington/Davidson Reserve
Greenbriar/Belle Meade Bourbon
Short Mountain
Tenn South
H Clark
Col. Hunter's (made by Leiper's Fork Distillery)

There are actually a good many Tennessee whiskey makers...they're not as widely distributed as the Kentucky bourbons, but in some ways, that's what makes them great. And they're not as limited by the confines of fitting the "bourbon" requirements, so they branch out and make a wider variety of interesting tastes. Corsair is the prime example of this. Their Triple Smoke, Rasputin, Ryemageddon, etc. are all very different tasting whiskeys, but all delicious in their own right.

Also, the Col. Hunter stuff, while hard to find, is fantastic. And expensive. Prichard's was my favorite whiskey from anywhere, but they hit a distribution snag...now it's hard to find and ridiculously priced if you find it.
 
#18

tnutater

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#18
Tennessee whiskeys/bourbons off the top of my head:

Jack Daniel's
George Dickel
Prichard's
Collier & McKeel
Corsair
Chattanooga Whiskey
Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan's Nashville distillery)
Uncle Nearest
Pennington/Davidson Reserve
Greenbriar/Belle Meade Bourbon
Short Mountain
Tenn South
H Clark
Col. Hunter's (made by Leiper's Fork Distillery)

There are actually a good many Tennessee whiskey makers...they're not as widely distributed as the Kentucky bourbons, but in some ways, that's what makes them great. And they're not as limited by the confines of fitting the "bourbon" requirements, so they branch out and make a wider variety of interesting tastes. Corsair is the prime example of this. Their Triple Smoke, Rasputin, Ryemageddon, etc. are all very different tasting whiskeys, but all delicious in their own right.

Also, the Col. Hunter stuff, while hard to find, is fantastic. And expensive. Prichard's was my favorite whiskey from anywhere, but they hit a distribution snag...now it's hard to find and ridiculously priced if you find it.
Prichard's IS the best. I still have a couple bottles under the kitchen sink that I keep for medicinal purposes only.
 
#23

golfballs

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#23
could a Kentucky bourbon that is charcoal filtered by the Lincoln County method be called Tennessee Whiskey?

There are several small distillers now in Tennessee that market as bourbon.

It is just marketing hype and something that the drunk users of the products can argue about. And everyone knows that drunks argue.
Would anyone making bourbon in Tennessee call it Kentucky Whiskey?
 

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