Millennials in the Workforce, A Generation of Weakness - Simon Sinek

roosterjbh

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I think the article sums it up pretty well...“Marriage is more and more an achievement of status, rather than something that people do regardless of how they’re doing.”

Back in the day, especially before women really started to enter the workforce, a woman needed to attach herself to a man. If you doing that because you need to, rather than because you want to, odds are there are going to be a higher percentage of people who marry somebody they don't even love, or love for a short period of time.

If instead you get married after you, for lack of a better term, have your s**t together, you are probably getting married because you want to. If you're getting married because you want to, you'll be really particular about the type of person you want, etc.
This is still poor decision making by both the man and woman. Also Boomers are still getting divorced at high rates even as they are getting old, when they should hypothetically have their s*** together.
 

05_never_again

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This is still poor decision making by both the man and woman. Also Boomers are still getting divorced at high rates even as they are getting old, when they should hypothetically have their s*** together.
Most of the boomer divorces that occur when they are older are "we've hated each other for years but stayed together for the kids" marriages finally falling apart.

Getting married because you need to is not really a thing anymore, so that's why the rate is going down. And the divorce rate exploded in the 70s, 80s, and 90s not because people were unhappier in marriage more than they were in the past. It was because the stigma associated with divorce began to go away, plus women started entering the workforce. I think just as many wives and husbands hated each other in 1950, but it was a huge societal taboo, especially for women, to get divorced.
 

Electric Orange

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Socrates (469399 B.C.)
QUOTATION:
The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.
ATTRIBUTION:
Attributed to SOCRATES by Plato, according to William L. Patty and Louise S. Johnson, Personality and Adjustment, p. 277
Oh Jesus no. Help us Gawd
They didn't rise when elders entered the room.

Sinners the lot of em



Please...
 

jackcrevol

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Baby boomers were lazy self absorbed hippies and pot heads preaching free love as kids.

Then hit their 30s in the 80s and became self absorbed money whores who sold their kids out for bigger houses and more things. Mommy got a job and the latch key society of children was born.

Baby boomer generation sucked ass.

This new generation is what happens when parents are self absorbed *******s.
View attachment 170057
 

jackcrevol

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Baby boomers were lazy self absorbed hippies and pot heads preaching free love as kids.

Then hit their 30s in the 80s and became self absorbed money whores who sold their kids out for bigger houses and more things. Mommy got a job and the latch key society of children was born.

Baby boomer generation sucked ass.

This new generation is what happens when parents are self absorbed *******s.
unless you were born via the Matrix, by my math you're either a Boomer or Gen Exer. If you're a Gen Ex'er show some ****ing respect.

That is witout a doubt one of the most shortsighted, insanely idiotic things I've ever heard any one human say.

What else would I expect from someone called 'Neocon'? Jesus.
 

burntorangeVOLffle

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I think the article sums it up pretty well...“Marriage is more and more an achievement of status, rather than something that people do regardless of how they’re doing.”

Back in the day, especially before women really started to enter the workforce, a woman needed to attach herself to a man. If you doing that because you need to, rather than because you want to, odds are there are going to be a higher percentage of people who marry somebody they don't even love, or love for a short period of time.

If instead you get married after you, for lack of a better term, have your s**t together, you are probably getting married because you want to. If you're getting married because you want to, you'll be really particular about the type of person you want, etc.
I wonder what the divorce rate of those who lived “in sin” together first vs those who didnt is.

Of course that could be skewed a stat depending how long they were together. I guess I would focus on divorces that happened within the first 5 years of marriage.
 

05_never_again

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I wonder what the divorce rate of those who lived “in sin” together first vs those who didnt is.

Of course that could be skewed a stat depending how long they were together. I guess I would focus on divorces that happened within the first 5 years of marriage.
I don't know what it is now, but I know that at some point in the past the divorce rates of those who lived together was a little bit higher than the entire population of married couples. Of course, that could be a classic correlation vs. causation thing.
 

burntorangeVOLffle

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I don't know what it is now, but I know that at some point in the past the divorce rates of those who lived together was a little bit higher than the entire population of married couples. Of course, that could be a classic correlation vs. causation thing.
That’s interesting. I’ve always felt you never REALLY know someone until you live with them.

My wife and I lived together for 3 years before getting married. I always felt those years gave us a strong foundation to build on. Purely anecdotal I know.
 

05_never_again

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That’s interesting. I’ve always felt you never REALLY know someone until you live with them.

My wife and I lived together for 3 years before getting married. I always felt those years gave us a strong foundation to build on. Purely anecdotal I know.
Yeah, some people I could see it helping and some I could see it hurting. Depends on the couple. There are a couple reasons why I think couples who live together before marriage get divorced more often, but they are both reasons of correlation, not causation:

1 - Not always, but often, couples live together for financial reasons. If they are facing challenges in their individual financial situations before living together, they probably are at higher risk for facing eventual financial challenges either as a cohabiting couple or when they get married. Financial difficulties are a huge cause of divorces.
2 - If you cohabit, odds are you are more secular than people who don't think you should cohabit. If you are more secular, perhaps you are more likely to seek a divorce if things don't work out.
 

pismonque

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The Boomers thought they had it figured out better than the stodgy old previous generation and they got a few things right but they also screwed a bunch of stuff up. Then they got settled in their ways and self-righteous and started griping about how the subsequent generations (whom they themselves created!) are full of crap and ruining everything.

Now go back and replace "Boomers" above with any other freakin' generation and that same statement will be just as right and just as wrong.

Labeling generations (or any other demographic cohort) and talking about they behave or think in an aggregated context is fine and useful for sociologists or demographers or anthropologists or whoever, as part of macro level studies. But for most of us, sitting around complaining about how "Millennials think this" or "GenXers do that" is really no more than the age-old "kids today" gripe. And that's fundamentally wrong-headed in assuming millions of people think alike because they were born within a couple decades of each other. And it often comes from people who can't or won't see that the societal norms and standards of any given time are constantly and necessarily evolving, informed by ongoing historical events, technologies, advancement of knowledge, evolving philosophies and cultural growth.

When I was a kid, there was a nasty war going on in Vietnam, we were knee-deep in Watergate, the civil rights movement was still pretty fresh, women weren't actual people yet, news took a day to find out about and a phone was a thing on the kitchen wall you used once or twice a day. How can I look at kids in today's world and complain about how they see things? They're negotiating an entirely different world than I was. They'll get some right, get some wrong, have kids and complain about them.
 

jackcrevol

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The Boomers thought they had it figured out better than the stodgy old previous generation and they got a few things right but they also screwed a bunch of stuff up. Then they got settled in their ways and self-righteous and started griping about how the subsequent generations (whom they themselves created!) are full of crap and ruining everything.

Now go back and replace "Boomers" above with any other freakin' generation and that same statement will be just as right and just as wrong.

Labeling generations (or any other demographic cohort) and talking about they behave or think in an aggregated context is fine and useful for sociologists or demographers or anthropologists or whoever, as part of macro level studies. But for most of us, sitting around complaining about how "Millennials think this" or "GenXers do that" is really no more than the age-old "kids today" gripe. And that's fundamentally wrong-headed in assuming millions of people think alike because they were born within a couple decades of each other. And it often comes from people who can't or won't see that the societal norms and standards of any given time are constantly and necessarily evolving, informed by ongoing historical events, technologies, advancement of knowledge, evolving philosophies and cultural growth.

When I was a kid, there was a nasty war going on in Vietnam, we were knee-deep in Watergate, the civil rights movement was still pretty fresh, women weren't actual people yet, news took a day to find out about and a phone was a thing on the kitchen wall you used once or twice a day. How can I look at kids in today's world and complain about how they see things? They're negotiating an entirely different world than I was. They'll get some right, get some wrong, have kids and complain about them.
My friends and I joke about the millenial's from time to time, which is admittedly a waste of time. Good post, makes sense.
 

Brave Volunteer

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The best thing I've read regarding millennials in the workforce is kids (and by kids I'm talking between 17 and 21) coming to job interviews with their parents! LMAO!! Can you make this **** up?? I would just love to imagine the look on my Dad's face if I had the nerve to ask him to accompany me to a job interview when I was 18! X-D
 

Rasputin_Vol

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The best thing I've read regarding millennials in the workforce is kids (and by kids I'm talking between 17 and 21) coming to job interviews with their parents! LMAO!! Can you make this **** up?? I would just love to imagine the look on my Dad's face if I had the nerve to ask him to accompany me to a job interview when I was 18! X-D
Is that a kid problem or a parent problem?
 

volfanbill

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The best thing I've read regarding millennials in the workforce is kids (and by kids I'm talking between 17 and 21) coming to job interviews with their parents! LMAO!! Can you make this **** up?? I would just love to imagine the look on my Dad's face if I had the nerve to ask him to accompany me to a job interview when I was 18! X-D
Those wouldn’t be millennials fyi
 

cali_vol

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I work with a bunch of milineals and I'm almost 50... almost, and find the majority to be highly intelligent and self motivated. Some think much more highly of themselves than they probably should but I did too at that age.
 

burntorangeVOLffle

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The best thing I've read regarding millennials in the workforce is kids (and by kids I'm talking between 17 and 21) coming to job interviews with their parents! LMAO!! Can you make this **** up?? I would just love to imagine the look on my Dad's face if I had the nerve to ask him to accompany me to a job interview when I was 18! X-D
Like sitting in on the interviews or driving them to the I interview and lingering around?

I used to be the GM of a restaurant and hired a lot of teenagers for evening shifts. They were true Millenials of their time. All of them are in their late 20s to early 30s now. We would have a lot of regular customers ask for applications for their kids and bring them down for interviews. Never really had a problem with it. In fact I liked knowing the parents of the kids. I ended up working with over 200 or more teenage Millenials over the years. The VAST majority were very teachable and turned out to be great employees. In a lot of ways they were better than the adults I had to hire for day shifts. From what I have seen on social media those that I kept up with have gone on to professional careers.
 

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