Iowa Football Players Put Fans On Notice

#3

Roustabout

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#3
Yes. Sounds like the coach was not allowing certain language and behavior that just happened to be prevalent among certain players. This is the part where white people have to accept “thug life” culture as synonymous with skin color.

As a more extreme example, This would be the same as saying female circumcision shouldn’t be criticized because it was performed by people with black skin. Someone’s skin color doesn’t make their culture, behavior or actions good.
 
#7

Roustabout

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#7
Then by all means please elaborate...that’s quite a broad brush you’re painting with.
I did elaborate but you quoted that out of context.
So, let me start by saying that skin color is sacred.
I don’t think ideas are sacred. I don’t think culture is sacred. As a white person I condemn cracker culture. If you roll up in a lifted truck with a rebel flag, playing redneck music, then I’m going to have immediate negative opinions. Don’t like it? Tough ****.

As someone who has ministered in the inner city for 15 years I see cultures that are harmful and destructive. I’ve found that in many cases, questioning this culture is synonymous with questioning race.
 
#8

Lawrence Wright

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#8
I did elaborate but you quoted that out of context.
So, let me start by saying that skin color is sacred.
I don’t think ideas are sacred. I don’t think culture is sacred. As a white person I condemn cracker culture. If you roll up in a lifted truck with a rebel flag, playing redneck music, then I’m going to have immediate negative opinions. Don’t like it? Tough ****.

As someone who has ministered in the inner city for 15 years I see cultures that are harmful and destructive. I’ve found that in many cases, questioning this culture is synonymous with questioning race.
Thanks for clarifying.

I think ideas are much more sacred than skin color, if nothing else the demographics of the protesters proves that point.

Likewise, a law enforcement officer without the proper training can do damage regardless of his/her race. The looters were of different ethnic backgrounds as well.

Culture evolves and changes over time, it’s not sacred in my opinion, and culture is not always about race.
 
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#12

Roustabout

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#12
Thanks for clarifying.

I think ideas are much more sacred than skin color, if nothing else the demographics of the protesters proves that point.

Likewise, a law enforcement officer without the proper training can do damage regardless of race. The looters were of different ethnic backgrounds as well.

Culture evolves and changes over time, it’s not sacred in my opinion, and culture is not always about race.
Help clarify as I’m finding some contradiction.
So, Nazi faciam (an idea) is sacred?

I would say culture shouldn’t be about race at all. It is. There are white people who have problems with things in the current Culture among some African American communities. I find the tendency is to reduce things down to color. This is a broad example but we heard a lot of people accused of racism because they were critical of Obama. We see a lot of conservative black people ostracized who don’t adhere to a certain narrative.

This is one of those complex sociological issues that will not get the attention it deserves.
 
#13

Lawrence Wright

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#13
Help clarify as I’m finding some contradiction.
So, Nazi faciam (an idea) is sacred?

I would say culture shouldn’t be about race at all. It is. There are white people who have problems with things in the current Culture among some African American communities. I find the tendency is to reduce things down to color. This is a broad example but we heard a lot of people accused of racism because they were critical of Obama. We see a lot of conservative black people ostracized who don’t adhere to a certain narrative.

This is one of those complex sociological issues that will not get the attention it deserves.
I’m saying ideas are more sacred than skin color because ideas can easily transcend skin color, and usually do. I think we are in agreement on that.

The merit of a particular idea (fascism for example) is a different conversation altogether.
 
#19

Roustabout

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#19
Can you specifically name some of these things?
Entitlements would be a big one.

I mentioned “thug life” culture.

Sorry, but if you coming walking into most businesses with droopy drawers, gold teeth, tats and waking like there’s a corn cob shoved up your ass, you’ll likely be profiled. If that same person is well dressed and polished they likely aren’t given a second thought due to their skin color.

I’m saying in the big picture this isn’t a race problem.
 
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#20

jmacvols1

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#20
Lulz...you do realize in college, players are in the locker room during the national anthem.
I understand. But the link I posted in the OP it reads like they are going to be going on the field to kneel during the national anthem.

From the link "If you can not support us right now with this movement and with our team taking a knee during the national anthem, DO NOT support us during the football season," he wrote. "DO NOT watch our games on TV. DO NOT come up to us when you want photos. DO NOT ask us to give your kids autographs. DON'T COME TO US EXPECTING US TO DO FOR YOU WHEN YOU CAN'T SUPPORT THE BLACK ATHLETES ON THIS TEAM AND THE DECISIONS WE MAKE AS A TEAM. I would rather play in front of 1,000 fans who care about us as people outside of football and what we are standing for, than 70,000 fans who only care about us when we are in uniform and on the field entertaining them."

I don't know what they do in the locker room, just keep off the field.
 
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#21

Lawrence Wright

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#21
Entitlements would be a big one.

I mentioned “thug life” culture.

Sorry, but if you coming walking into most businesses with droopy drawers, gold teeth, tats and waking like there’s a corn cob shoved up your ass, you’ll likely be profiled. If that we person is well dressed and polished they likely aren’t given second thought due to their skin color.

I’m saying in the big picture this isn’t a race problem.
Please connect the dots on what acceptable workplace attire has to do with CFB.

And what entitlements are you referring to?
Scholarships?
 
#22

Lawrence Wright

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#22
I understand. But the link I posted in the OP it reads like they are going to be going on the field to knell during the national anthem.

From the link "If you can not support us right now with this movement and with our team taking a knee during the national anthem, DO NOT support us during the football season," he wrote. "DO NOT watch our games on TV. DO NOT come up to us when you want photos. DO NOT ask us to give your kids autographs. DON'T COME TO US EXPECTING US TO DO FOR YOU WHEN YOU CAN'T SUPPORT THE BLACK ATHLETES ON THIS TEAM AND THE DECISIONS WE MAKE AS A TEAM. I would rather play in front of 1,000 fans who care about us as people outside of football and what we are standing for, than 70,000 fans who only care about us when we are in uniform and on the field entertaining them."

I don't know what they do in the locker room, just keep off the field.
You can rest easy....

Do you honestly think UT’s players are going to break up your well-timed and choreographed pre-game to kneel while UT’s band is in their “USA” formation?

Now, college basketball games might get interesting.
 
#25

Roustabout

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#25
Please connect the dots on what acceptable workplace attire has to do with CFB.

And what entitlements are you referring to?
Scholarships?
No, I’m speaking on much broader terms.
I think Jeremy Banks is a great example. Let me state that I support his return to the team. His attitude in the video is thug life. The problem is he didn’t grow up in the hood. He adopted an attitude and culture. Those things Have NOTHING intrinsically to do with skin color.
 

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