Heat Pump Woes

#27

InVOLuntary

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#27
I won''t have nat gas available where I'm building either, but I may go with a dual fuel and bury a propane tank.
It's my understanding you have to buy the tank as apposed to leasing when you bury but that's not a bad thing. When you own your tank you can bid out the propane. If you lease a tank, other companies won't sell you gas, you are stuck with whomever owns the tank. Some companies won't sell you propane unless they own the tank, which I think is a crock. Another thing, you can't fill an above ground tank to more than 80% whereas when you bury it it can be filled to 100%.
 
#28

1972 Grad

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#28
It's my understanding you have to buy the tank as apposed to leasing when you bury but that's not a bad thing. When you own your tank you can bid out the propane. If you lease a tank, other companies won't sell you gas, you are stuck with whomever owns the tank. Some companies won't sell you propane unless they own the tank, which I think is a crock. Another thing, you can't fill an above ground tank to more than 80% whereas when you bury it it can be filled to 100%.
I have one buried at my place in N.C. mountains , and used to have one at the house we lived in before this one. I just have a heat pump here.
 
#29

VolStrom

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#29
I looked into burying a tank when I first moved in and they all said yeah, but you pay for burying it and digging it up if you don't want it anymore (no sales only leases). Maybe things have changed, but the cost of electricity to have the electric emergency heat come on during really cold weather is probably only a few hundred dollars a year, if that.
Face it, it only gets really cold in Tennessee a few weeks a year, mostly it's pretty mild during the winter and I have a gas fireplace that I supplement the heat with when it gets really cold.
 
#30

1972 Grad

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#30
I looked into burying a tank when I first moved in and they all said yeah, but you pay for burying it and digging it up if you don't want it anymore (no sales only leases). Maybe things have changed, but the cost of electricity to have the electric emergency heat come on during really cold weather is probably only a few hundred dollars a year, if that.
Face it, it only gets really cold in Tennessee a few weeks a year, mostly it's pretty mild during the winter and I have a gas fireplace that I supplement the heat with when it gets really cold.
A propane backup costs an extra $12-1,500 over heat strips, and will not save you any money on heat bills unless you have natural gas. It just gives you warmer air coming out of the vents, and may feel a little warmer. It is probably worth it if you have natural gas. Either way, I would get a variable speed air handler. I have had it, and it is worth it in my opinion.
 
#31

VolStrom

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#31
A propane backup costs an extra $12-1,500 over heat strips, and will not save you any money on heat bills unless you have natural gas. It just gives you warmer air coming out of the vents, and may feel a little warmer. It is probably worth it if you have natural gas. Either way, I would get a variable speed air handler. I have had it, and it is worth it in my opinion.
That's good to know that there is that kind of increase in price to have a hybrid system, it's not worth it to me. If I had natural gas, "heat pump" wouldn't be in my vocabulary. My very first house that I owned had a heat pump and I think where I'm living today will be my very last house also has a heat pump. The circle of life!
 
#32

Go aeiou

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#32
I had a heat pump only when I first built my house 12 years ago. I replaced my entire unit with a heat pump/gas back-up. When it gets below a certain temp, the gas kicks on instead of the heat pump. I live in central Kentucky, and it gets too cold for a heat pump alone to keep up. Maybe something to look into next go around.
That's the way to go. But can be expensive.
 
#33

1972 Grad

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#33
That's good to know that there is that kind of increase in price to have a hybrid system, it's not worth it to me. If I had natural gas, "heat pump" wouldn't be in my vocabulary. My very first house that I owned had a heat pump and I think where I'm living today will be my very last house also has a heat pump. The circle of life!
I'm with you on nat gas . I lived in a rental for 3 years after we sold our house that we built. It had NG, and I would do that again in a heartbeat. The new 15-17 SEER heat pumps aren't bad at all. Like I said, at a minimum get a variable speed indoor air handler. Anytime that you don't have a hard rush of air blowing through, you won't have drafts.
 
#34

Go aeiou

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#34
That's good to know that there is that kind of increase in price to have a hybrid system, it's not worth it to me. If I had natural gas, "heat pump" wouldn't be in my vocabulary. My very first house that I owned had a heat pump and I think where I'm living today will be my very last house also has a heat pump. The circle of life!
Wife and I moved to this house in 2011, and said when we moved in, "the next move is either to a nursing home or funeral home".😁
 
#35

VolunteerHillbilly

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#35
Wife and I moved to this house in 2011, and said when we moved in, "the next move is either to a nursing home or funeral home".😁
My parents built a house with that in mind when they were about 60. High countertops and toilets to minimize bending over. Walk in showers. All wood and tile flooring on first level in case you gotta get around on wheels. The second floor is all guestrooms so they never have to go up there once stairs become an issue. They only part of the yard that isn't maintained by the crew that their hoa hires is a small courtyard and my dad has whatever isn't paved covered with mulch. Wide doorways too. I love it.
 

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