All things STOCKS

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I'm still not seeing where you can look back and see the past orders placed, executed or open. The trade confirmations don't indicate when you made the order.

I'm not sure if I still have any open ones left that I'm not able to find. Or if that was the last one.
Set up a GTC-DNR limit order that will never execute (like buy 1 share of AMZN for $100) and then go find it on the platform. If it is the only listed order then you don’t have any stray open orders.
 
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volfan_28

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I swear ARKK investors are monitoring my activity! Today, I FINALLY gave up on holding and cut my losses at $80.54 with intent to re-enter at around $60. It's up 5% since I sold. In other words, I literally sold at the absolute worst time. Doh!!
 

Firebirdparts

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I'll just admit here that when I hit 50, I adjusted my long-term investments such that I have some bonds, and in fact some are long-term, so they would be vulnerable to rate hikes. So while this was a "safety" move, I am exposed to one thing, and that one thing is 8 rate hikes. When the cost of money goes up, stocks and bonds both will react, downward, at the same time.

In my Roth I am running something commonly referred to on the internet as "Hedgefundies Excellent Adventure" which is basically a 50/50 mix of UPRO/TMF. These are 3X leveraged ETF's. UPRO is 3X the S&P500 and TMF is 3X the trading price of 30 year treasuries. You can substitute something else for the TMF portion, but it becomes a really difficult choice for a variety of reasons. So this also is very exposed to 8 rate hikes right now. I'm not afraid to substitute the TMF, and in fact I did, but TMF got so cheap i have been reaccumulating it.

In other news, it's a new year, and I bought my allotment of treasury I-bonds today. paying 7%.
 
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Firebirdparts

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Getting back to stocks, we had discussed here MACK which is somewhat comically shut down awaiting a "big payday". This is something that'll either go to zero or multiply by 5 or something. Whatever. There was a very large purchase yesterday, could be an idiot, hopefully it's somebody with the inside scoop. There is continued buying today, so I would say a hangover effect from the big purchase yesterday.
MOS also killing it. I don't have any.
I had been in and out of something called VALE which is primarily a foreign iron miner. They had fallen almost 50%, but started a big surge up on january 5. Still going. No news really. The expectation is that iron prices fall, and so nobody quite knows how low to value these things.
 

Go aeiou

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I'll just admit here that when I hit 50, I adjusted my long-term investments such that I have some bonds, and in fact some are long-term, so they would be vulnerable to rate hikes. So while this was a "safety" move, I am exposed to one thing, and that one thing is 8 rate hikes. When the cost of money goes up, stocks and bonds both will react, downward, at the same time.

In my Roth I am running something commonly referred to on the internet as "Hedgefundies Excellent Adventure" which is basically a 50/50 mix of UPRO/TMF. These are 3X leveraged ETF's. UPRO is 3X the S&P500 and TMF is 3X the trading price of 30 year treasuries. You can substitute something else for the TMF portion, but it becomes a really difficult choice for a variety of reasons. So this also is very exposed to 8 rate hikes right now. I'm not afraid to substitute the TMF, and in fact I did, but TMF got so cheap i have been reaccumulating it.

In other news, it's a new year, and I bought my allotment of treasury I-bonds today. paying 7%.
I think you can buy more I bonds(5k) if you have a tax refund. Weird law.
 

tbh

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What do y'all think about KMI, from a dividends perspective? From what I've read their business model (long-ish term contracts) makes cashflow fairly predictable year-to-year, plus they have a good yield and a decent P/E ratio. I've thrown a bit into it given the low cost-of-entry, so to speak.
 

05_never_again

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What do y'all think about KMI, from a dividends perspective? From what I've read their business model (long-ish term contracts) makes cashflow fairly predictable year-to-year, plus they have a good yield and a decent P/E ratio. I've thrown a bit into it given the low cost-of-entry, so to speak.
I think it makes sense as a longer-term hold, yeah. Nice dividend and I think the impending death of fossil fuels is extremely exaggerated. The Kinetrex deal they pulled off last year is interesting.
 
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I think it makes sense as a longer-term hold, yeah. Nice dividend and I think the impending death of fossil fuels is extremely exaggerated. The Kinetrex deal they pulled off last year is interesting.
Even the Greenies should be embracing pipelines. It’s a really efficient, clean way to move energy. Instead, when the liberals block a new pipeline there are a sh** ton more semis rolling. But then they also oppose nuclear which has proven to be extremely friendly for the environment in relative terms. Sun and wind have brainwashed many into believing that they are viable (and environmentally copacetic) replacements. Oil isn’t about to end and buying midstream, upstream, and downstream when equity prices are low should always pay off for patient investors.
 

05_never_again

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Even the Greenies should be embracing pipelines. It’s a really efficient, clean way to move energy. Instead, when the liberals block a new pipeline there are a sh** ton more semis rolling. But then they also oppose nuclear which has proven to be extremely friendly for the environment in relative terms. Sun and wind have brainwashed many into believing that they are viable (and environmentally copacetic) replacements. Oil isn’t about to end and buying midstream, upstream, and downstream when equity prices are low should always pay off for patient investors.
They don't (and never will) because they are not practical but rather ideological. They don't like nuclear for the same reason. They are so nuts I'm surprised they like wind power as much as they do given how much wildlife the wind turbines kill.
 
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Velo Vol

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In my Roth I am running something commonly referred to on the internet as "Hedgefundies Excellent Adventure" which is basically a 50/50 mix of UPRO/TMF. These are 3X leveraged ETF's. UPRO is 3X the S&P500 and TMF is 3X the trading price of 30 year treasuries. You can substitute something else for the TMF portion, but it becomes a really difficult choice for a variety of reasons. So this also is very exposed to 8 rate hikes right now. I'm not afraid to substitute the TMF, and in fact I did, but TMF got so cheap i have been reaccumulating it.
Is it worth the bother for someone who's not heard of it to figure out, now, in a rising-rates environment?
 
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They don't (and never will) because they are not practical but rather ideological. They don't like nuclear for the same reason. They are so nuts I'm surprised they like wind power as much as they do given how much wildlife the wind turbines kill.
If this was the Politics Forum I’d have some comments to make about rules for thee not for me, limousines, anti-second amendment politicians hiding behind their armed security detail, and other hypocrisy. So I’ll just say I’m pro energy and especially prefer being a net exporter.
 
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Velo Vol

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In my Roth I am running something commonly referred to on the internet as "Hedgefundies Excellent Adventure" which is basically a 50/50 mix of UPRO/TMF. These are 3X leveraged ETF's. UPRO is 3X the S&P500 and TMF is 3X the trading price of 30 year treasuries. You can substitute something else for the TMF portion, but it becomes a really difficult choice for a variety of reasons. So this also is very exposed to 8 rate hikes right now. I'm not afraid to substitute the TMF, and in fact I did, but TMF got so cheap i have been reaccumulating it.
So this is basically what it is (it says 55% UPRO / 45% TMF)? You invest $X in these two funds, and periodically shift money back and forth to maintain that ratio? And it's outperformed any of the major indexes over the last 20 years?
 
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