A Succinct Brief on the NCAA Woes.

#1

VolDave53

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#1
ESPN did a nice job on this article, without getting into to much minutia, of summarizing the current lawsuits and state activities against unrestrained selective enforcement. Not a long read. Too many threads to pass this along without multiple entries.

 
#4
#4
Does anyone think football or basketball players at major schools are “amateur“? That notion has sailed. They are pros now. School or state pride is pretty much gone. It’s about the money, where your friends are, where can you get the most exposure, and who the coach is.
Free agency ended my fandom in MLB but MLB survived my departure. I am sure college sports will also survive. I don’t blame the plyers for getting all they can but my enjoyment is significantly diminished.
 
#7
#7
Does anyone think football or basketball players at major schools are “amateur“? That notion has sailed. They are pros now. School or state pride is pretty much gone. It’s about the money, where your friends are, where can you get the most exposure, and who the coach is.
Free agency ended my fandom in MLB but MLB survived my departure. I am sure college sports will also survive. I don’t blame the plyers for getting all they can but my enjoyment is significantly diminished.
How many of the 5k div I BB players do you think are getting NIL? Baseball? Field hockey? Even women’s BB?

How many total players are earning REAL MONEY across all sports? What % of all athletes in the 363 D1 schools?

COULD BE that the end game will be a NEW NIL division to keep the NCAA or a successor in play. Got to have some structure and funding for ALL the lessor sports oversight.
 
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#11
This NIL thing is likely to end in a flat rate being paid to all players. Players get paid and eliminates bidding wars. Also removes incentive to change school just for the money.
NIL is just a middle man. If this continues to it's logical conclusion, there will be no NIL collectives. The schools will eventually be paying these players. The issues with the portal and salary caps will be resolved when the players collectively bargain with the schools and enter into a collective bargaining agreement. If the US Supreme Court has any say, this will happen very soon.
 
#12
#12
The NCAA has always been flawed, but it has presided over the sport I love my entire life.

With the way things are going, I'm not sure I will enjoy it in the same way going into the future.
This is going to be interesting and quite possibly tragic at the same time. I think most agree athletes should be free to take as much money as another party is legally willing to pay them. However, when their fame and fortune is somewhat dependent on a money producing behemoth that by law has to share that revenue with title 9 interest and most programs don't produce SEC and Big 10 money, it stands to reason that some programs will suffer and or be discontinued.

We've already seen universities discontinue or cut men's programs to be title 9 compliant. I'm not sure how we are going to like the results when 10 to 20% of the projected revenue get's set aside for the players of the golden goose sports.
 
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#13
#13
This NIL thing is likely to end in a flat rate being paid to all players. Players get paid and eliminates bidding wars. Also removes incentive to change school just for the money.
Without a collective bargaining agreement, that idea has no chance to survive a challenge. Iows, you can't tell Caleb Williams he is restricted from making over 100K per yr in endorsement deals even if you are paying the back up right guard 100K as well.
 
#15
#15
Much of what we're seeing now is because of a long campaign by black social-justice activists, who've pushed this notion that many people
are getting rich off black college football players. It's nonsense. The major coaches are getting rich--but that's it. Google Romogi Huma--the activist mentioned in the ESPN story above--and you'll see what I'm referring to. What the campaign has succeeded in doing has created this /public perception/ that the players are exploited. It's nonsense, but after 20 years it's work--especially today's environment.
 
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#18
#18
NIL is just a middle man. If this continues to it's logical conclusion, there will be no NIL collectives. The schools will eventually be paying these players. The issues with the portal and salary caps will be resolved when the players collectively bargain with the schools and enter into a collective bargaining agreement. If the US Supreme Court has any say, this will happen very soon.

Thats not true. The school is actually the middle man. The real flow is from the booster to the athlete. While the booster(s) may only want to pay the athletes that the school wants and only as long as they are playing for the school, the reality is all this money is coming from private parties outside the school. It would not be more transparent to give it to the school and then it goes to the athlete. SCOTUS has basically killed that because it is saying these athletes can negotiate their own value with these private parties.
 
#19
#19
Without a collective bargaining agreement, that idea has no chance to survive a challenge. Iows, you can't tell Caleb Williams he is restricted from making over 100K per yr in endorsement deals even if you are paying the back up right guard 100K as well.
I’m not sure what the incentive would be for collective bargaining at the highest levels of football. The players are making more now than what collective bargaining would get, are they not?
 
#21
#21
This NIL thing is likely to end in a flat rate being paid to all players. Players get paid and eliminates bidding wars. Also removes incentive to change school just for the money.
The best players will always have an opportunity to get more money than the average players. That's the way it's always worked--just under the table.

If they're fortunate enough to make it to the next level, it will work the same way. The best players make the most money. That's life
 
#22
#22
This is going to be interesting and quite possibly tragic at the same time. I think most agree athletes should be free to take as much money as another party is legally willing to pay them. However, when their fame and fortune is somewhat dependent on a money producing behemoth that by law has to share that revenue with title 9 interest and most programs don't produce SEC and Big 10 money, it stands to reason that some programs will suffer and or be discontinued.

We've already seen universities discontinue or cut men's programs to be title 9 compliant. I'm not sure how we are going to like the results when 10 to 20% of the projected revenue get's set aside for the players of the golden goose sports.
The money outcome of the brave new world of college sports and costs va profit...

A lot of Olympic schools will drop Olympic sports as varsity programs. They could keep them as club sports if they wished, like the UGa and Florida club hockey teams.

Other than football, the most likely survivors are men's and women's basketball. That leaves a Title IX problem. The easy answer - start women's football programs for balance.

Play the home games when the men's team is on the road and vice versa.

It would be less expensive than paying hundreds of athletes for Olympic sports participation.
 
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#23
#23
NIL is just a middle man. If this continues to it's logical conclusion, there will be no NIL collectives. The schools will eventually be paying these players. The issues with the portal and salary caps will be resolved when the players collectively bargain with the schools and enter into a collective bargaining agreement. If the US Supreme Court has any say, this will happen very soon.
Nope. NIL is a separate money source from the school.
 
#24
#24
And UT is fighting it's ass off to make sure the kids get their piece. Where are the rest of the institutions ? NCAA wants to deny those same kids
You do realize this money does not go directly to the kids. It is part of UT's operating budget, not NIL. As of now, two different issues.
 
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I’m not sure what the incentive would be for collective bargaining at the highest levels of football. The players are making more now than what collective bargaining would get, are they not?
Since the NRLB has ruled that Dartmouth basketball players are employees of the school, a collective bargaining agreement is almost mandatory unless you want free agency 24/7/365. Basically, the current NCAA scholarship contract is being ripped to shreds but there does need to be a contractual agreement that protects all parties involved.

As far as college athletes go, there aren't many ways to get an agreement without a collective. It's going to be a bumpy ride but at the end of the day, we hopefully end up with each kid getting a fair pay for play deal with insurance and other benes as well as the opportunity to capitalize on their endorsement value.
 

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