The Gardening Thread

norrislakevol

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Summer treats from the garden! The biggest Crimson Sweet watermelon weighed 25 pounds. If you have never had an Ambrosia cantaloupe, then do yourself a favor and raise some. They are wonderful and vigorous! I tried something different this year with my okra. I spaced some of my plants about 18 inches apart. The results have been very good. More healthy plants and bigger more tender okra pods. Even some of the 10 inch pods were still incredibly tender!
 

Tin Man

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Summer treats from the garden! The biggest Crimson Sweet watermelon weighed 25 pounds. If you have never had an Ambrosia cantaloupe, then do yourself a favor and raise some. They are wonderful and vigorous! I tried something different this year with my okra. I spaced some of my plants about 18 inches apart. The results have been very good. More healthy plants and bigger more tender okra pods. Even some of the 10 inch pods were still incredibly tender!
I cannot abide big okra pods. Gimme them baby okra pods <= 3".
 
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Tin Man

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My tomatoes are just about done for the year. My cherry tomato plant is still producing prodigious sized tomatoes. One of my Cherokee purple + whatever hybrid cross pollinated last year’s is still producing. The others are spent.
 

VolNExile

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My tomatoes are just about done for the year. My cherry tomato plant is still producing prodigious sized tomatoes. One of my Cherokee purple + whatever hybrid cross pollinated last year’s is still producing. The others are spent.
I look out at our tomatoes, almost all equally spent, and can only say “thank God.” I’m just trying to keep what’s still going alive until the garden tour next (not this) Saturday, and then out it comes!
 

sportsnut624

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Not sure if army worms affect gardens or not but if you are in East Tennessee be on the lookout. Caught them early in the backyard so only lost about a quarter of it. The rest of my neighborhood has dead yards because of those things. Apparently real bad year for them.
 

VolNExile

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Pulled out the last two tomato plants on Sunday. Ate the last cherry tomato this morning with breakfast. Will start seeds again in the coming Winter.
Tomatoes and beans are gone, yay! Jalapeños and pepperoni are and most sweet peppers are gone; cayennes showing no signs of stopping. Tomatillos covered in blooms in the bed where I want to plant onions, garlic, and shallots. 1632835437274.gif
 
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Tin Man

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My missus read that coffee grounds will discourage cut worms, so we’re saving ours to use as top dressing next Spring. Anyone have experience with this?
 

CagleMtnVol

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My missus read that coffee grounds will discourage cut worms, so we’re saving ours to use as top dressing next Spring. Anyone have experience with this?
Don't know about the cut worms, but coffee grounds are very good for your compost.

Unfortunately no one on my house drinks coffee.
 

VolNExile

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Don't know about the cut worms, but coffee grounds are very good for your compost.

Unfortunately no one on my house drinks coffee.
+1

Same - no clue on cutworms or top-dressing with coffee grounds, but we add a lot of coffee grounds to our compost pile, and the various earthworms are certainly not hurt. Maybe the caffeine makes them perky enough to escape the birds! 🪱🪱🪱

— Ok, my bad, cutworms are actually moth larvae; in other words, caterpillars. I did several searches (cutworms coffee grounds site:edu), and I found nothing about using coffee grounds (or diatomaceous earth or crushed egg-shells, etc.) All references were to eliminating plant debris and other hiding places, hand-picking, protecting stems with aluminum foil etc., and various nuclear options if things get completely out of control.

My own guess is that it wouldn’t hurt, but dunno if it helps. Since caterpillars are soft-bodied, it might be an interesting experiment to save your egg shells, roughly crush them, and spread them around.

Call your county extension agent Master Gardener helpline! That’s what we’re there for. 1634591371919.gif Seriously, nothing like a good detective hunt, especially in IPM (Integrated Pest Management.)
 
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gmaynard

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only problem i have with cutworms is planting time for tomatoes. cut worm has to wrap around stem of plant to chew so i stick a small tree branch about six inches long 3/8 in diameter next to each tomato plant
 

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