The Gardening Thread

GVF

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Radishes are weird too. Look real good. Benn well over 30 days. But the root is no thicker than a toothpick. I'm usually harvesting those by now. And my golden beets never germinated.
 

VolNExile

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I may retry planting them late summer them. It's not that their doing bad. THe ones that germinated look good. Not big yet, but look good and healthy. They just had a low germination. Probably will seed my brussel sprouts before too long as well, so that they will have a fall bearing seaon.
Do you seed your Brussels sprouts directly in the ground, or start inside? I have a spot in the garden that will probably be open for new plants in 3-4 weeks.

I have an itty-bitty veg garden consisting of 6 small raised beds. I don’t plant in rows, etc.
 

GVF

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Do you seed your Brussels sprouts directly in the ground, or start inside? I have a spot in the garden that will probably be open for new plants in 3-4 weeks.

I have an itty-bitty veg garden consisting of 6 small raised beds. I don’t plant in rows, etc.
This wil be my first time planting them. I love them roasted or from a pot. Discovered my son really likes the, since last year. I was planning on direct seeding. I hope that's sufficient.
 
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GVF

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Do you seed your Brussels sprouts directly in the ground, or start inside? I have a spot in the garden that will probably be open for new plants in 3-4 weeks.

I have an itty-bitty veg garden consisting of 6 small raised beds. I don’t plant in rows, etc.
I planted a little tighter this year hoping for more weed control. So i ended up with a unused block almost as big as your 6 raised beds. Was going to put taters down, but never got them. I bought some reds this weekend I was planning on letting sit in the kitchen a couple weeks and get the eyes budding. I'ts already late and prob too hot, but i'm gonna try anyway. Brussels will go in part of that space.

I went to the block weaving method on supporting my maters this year. First time ever trying that. Ditched all my homemade mater cages. So far, I'm very pleased with the results. My healthiest looking mater plants right now are the 3 dwarf varieties. But, all are doing well. I also added about a pount of worm castings to each hole, and my son has root watered miracle grow on them twice, when he does the peppers. We are gonna hit triple digit heat this week with no rain, so I will be having an evening watering session tomorrow probably to get the fertilizer and lime breaking down I applied yesterday. Big mistake day watering in heat that high. Sun that hot will turn water droplets on leaves into magnifying glasses.
 
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VolNExile

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I planted a little tighter this year hoping for more weed control. So i ended up with a unused block almost as big as your 6 raised beds. Was going to put taters down, but never got them. I bought some reds this weekend I was planning on letting sit in the kitchen a couple weeks and get the eyes budding. I'ts already late and prob too hot, but i'm gonna try anyway. Brussels will go in part of that space.

I went to the block weaving method on supporting my maters this year. First time ever trying that. Ditched all my homemade mater cages. So far, I'm very pleased with the results. My healthiest looking mater plants right now are the 3 dwarf varieties. But, all are doing well. I also added about a pount of worm castings to each hole, and my son has root watered miracle grow on them twice, when he does the peppers. We are gonna hit triple digit heat this week with no rain, so I will be having an evening watering session tomorrow probably to get the fertilizer and lime breaking down I applied yesterday. Big mistake day watering in heat that high. Sun that hot will turn water droplets on leaves into magnifying glasses.
I’m experimenting with training the indeterminate tomatoes to single stems and running each plant up a rope, in hopes of avoiding tomato jungles with the accompanying disease. (I’m using rope, because I didn’t discover the heavy-duty garden twine from Johnny’s until too late. I’ll use it in future projects though.) Grow Tomatoes Vertically to Enhance Your Harvest - FineGardening

And like you, I’ve given up on tomato cages. I’m going to use 6’ stakes for the determinate tomatoes (Roma, San Marzano, and Principe Borghese.) Tomato plants always seem to explode in July, and I’m determined to get on top of them this year!
 

VolNExile

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This wil be my first time planting them. I love them roasted or from a pot. Discovered my son really likes the, since last year. I was planning on direct seeding. I hope that's sufficient.
The Asheville growing season is generally shorter than in the rest of the Southeast, so I’ll probably start them inside to get a jump on things. Not to mention the freakin’ squirrels. 🤬
 

Go aeiou

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Radishes are weird too. Look real good. Benn well over 30 days. But the root is no thicker than a toothpick. I'm usually harvesting those by now. And my golden beets never germinated.
I've always had better luck with radishes planted in the fall. In Nashville I wait until late Sept./ early October to plant them, and use only organic fertizer(not high nitrogn).
They tend to be more flavorful without the heat when planted in the fall.
 
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GVF

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I've always had better luck with radishes planted in the fall. In Nashville I wait until late Sept./ early October to plant them, and use only organic fertizer(not high nitrogn).
They tend to be more flavorful without the heat when planted in the fall.
They are normally ready for me in spring before the heat comes. We have a pretty cool spring. THey are just acting weird this year. First time I've never got a full radish root after this many weeks. I disvoered roasting them in oven with other veggies last year. Extra radish points for that one.
 
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GVF

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I’m experimenting with training the indeterminate tomatoes to single stems and running each plant up a rope, in hopes of avoiding tomato jungles with the accompanying disease. (I’m using rope, because I didn’t discover the heavy-duty garden twine from Johnny’s until too late. I’ll use it in future projects though.) Grow Tomatoes Vertically to Enhance Your Harvest - FineGardening

And like you, I’ve given up on tomato cages. I’m going to use 6’ stakes for the determinate tomatoes (Roma, San Marzano, and Principe Borghese.) Tomato plants always seem to explode in July, and I’m determined to get on top of them this year!
I already keep that sucker branch pinched off the article mentions. Just cleaned mine up yesterday. I did miss some hte week before, but not enough to worry about. I didn't read the whole article, but another thing to do if you really want to get serious getting the most your tomatoes can give, is to prune off all branches beneath where you just picked tomatoes. Tomato plants will not -re-bloom or produce below what has already fruited. Once you start getting good clusters, get rid of all stems and foliage below that so it feeds the fruit. Follwing those pruning tips, and in a controlled greenhouse climate, indeterminates can get absurd in total length/height. I knew a guy that was growing them in part of one of his old chicken houses he rigged for a greenhouse. He used those big bag pots and strung htem up like you are talking about. When they reached the ceiling, he turn them horizontal. THey just kept going. No telling what he got from one plant but they were hitting 15-20 feet. And he clipped everything off the main stem behind any fruit as well. I do keep mine thinned, but I don't take the time to clear off the main branch like that.
 
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VolNExile

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I already keep that sucker branch pinched off the article mentions. Just cleaned mine up yesterday. I did miss some hte week before, but not enough to worry about. I didn't read the whole article, but another thing to do if you really want to get serious getting the most your tomatoes can give, is to prune off all branches beneath where you just picked tomatoes. Tomato plants will not -re-bloom or produce below what has already fruited. Once you start getting good clusters, get rid of all stems and foliage below that so it feeds the fruit. Follwing those pruning tips, and in a controlled greenhouse climate, indeterminates can get absurd in total length/height. I knew a guy that was growing them in part of one of his old chicken houses he rigged for a greenhouse. He used those big bag pots and strung htem up like you are talking about. When they reached the ceiling, he turn them horizontal. THey just kept going. No telling what he got from one plant but they were hitting 15-20 feet. And he clipped everything off the main stem behind any fruit as well. I do keep mine thinned, but I don't take the time to clear off the main branch like that.
Supposedly you can lower the rope or twine as they get really tall, and the main stem will just lie on the ground. I don’t know if I’ll have the nerve to try that though. And the trellis is 10’ tall, so they have another 7 or so feet to go. 🤪

My main reason for doing this is to improve air circulation and light. I grow mostly heirlooms, and unfortunately the prevailing winds and weather in WNC comes up from the Gulf, bringing all the crap Florida blights and fungal diseases.
 
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Tin Man

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I use tall stakes, too, Exie. When the mater vines grow beyond the tops, I trail them along a lattice of strings.

Cherokee purples produce prodigious suckers. I am diligent pruning these away, but all of my vines “Y” out at some point. Two already have at ~3 feet. Luckily, each has a flower cluster below the branching.
 

Go aeiou

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I use tall stakes, too, Exie. When the mater vines grow beyond the tops, I trail them along a lattice of strings.

Cherokee purples produce prodigious suckers. I am diligent pruning these away, but all of my vines “Y” out at some point. Two already have at ~3 feet. Luckily, each has a flower cluster below the branching.
i typically use a 6 ft fencce post and a cage. I grow 2 cherokee purples(wifes fav), 1 pink Brandywine(my fav), 1 Red BW, a cherry tomatoes that looks like a small Cherokee purple, a yellow, and a better boy or similar. The heirlooms grow out of the top of the cage and hang over the the top ring.
You eat the heirlooms, and the better boys don't seem very flavorful.
 
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Go aeiou

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Supposedly you can lower the rope or twine as they get really tall, and the main stem will just lie on the ground. I don’t know if I’ll have the nerve to try that though. And the trellis is 10’ tall, so they have another 7 or so feet to go. 🤪

My main reason for doing this is to improve air circulation and light. I grow mostly heirlooms, and unfortunately the prevailing winds and weather in WNC comes up from the Gulf, bringing all the crap Florida blights and fungal diseases.
My father-in-law used to use wheat straw mulch, and not grow vertically at all. He just let the tomatoes sprawl on top of the mulch. He had plenty of room in his garden though.
 
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GVF

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Supposedly you can lower the rope or twine as they get really tall, and the main stem will just lie on the ground. I don’t know if I’ll have the nerve to try that though. And the trellis is 10’ tall, so they have another 7 or so feet to go. 🤪

My main reason for doing this is to improve air circulation and light. I grow mostly heirlooms, and unfortunately the prevailing winds and weather in WNC comes up from the Gulf, bringing all the crap Florida blights and fungal diseases.
Kudos on the heirloom varietites. That's all I grow. Just for the fun of it and trying the different flavors of such. I used to throw in a Better Boy to make sure I got some. I always thought it to be one of the best tasting hybrids and dependable to grow. Yeah, you're right on hte air circulation using this method. It's supposed to really improve the maters. We'll both find out. This is where mine are now"
P1.jpg
These were my choices this year (First 5)
1884
1655212920708.jpeg
Dwarf Tasmanian Chocolate
1655213012554.jpeg
Dwarf Velvet Night Cherry
1655213081305.jpeg
San Marzano Redorta
1655213252197.jpeg
Thorburn's Terra Cotta
1655213311108.jpeg
 

GVF

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I use tall stakes, too, Exie. When the mater vines grow beyond the tops, I trail them along a lattice of strings.

Cherokee purples produce prodigious suckers. I am diligent pruning these away, but all of my vines “Y” out at some point. Two already have at ~3 feet. Luckily, each has a flower cluster below the branching.
Since I'm not vertically able to hammer down tall stakes, I've used steel t-posts to start. When the vine heights calls for it, I will zip tie tall wood stakes to the posts and keep the weave going.
 
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GVF

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My father-in-law used to use wheat straw mulch, and not grow verticly at all. He just let the tomatoes sprawl on top of the mulch. He had plenty of room in his garden though.
I presume when these great tomatoes were discovered and tamed they had not staked themselves up. I'm kind of curious about letting one do it's natural thing and see what happens.
 

VolNExile

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I presume when these great tomatoes were discovered and tamed they had not staked themselves up. I'm kind of curious about letting one do it's natural thing and see what happens.
It’s true that in their natural environment, they just sprawl along the ground. And that works great for them, because that way all the critters have easy access to the fruit and can poop the seeds far and wide! That’s the name of the game for seed-producing plants (and animals) - spread your DNA by seed as best as you can.
 
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VolNExile

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Since I'm not vertically able to hammer down tall stakes, I've used steel t-posts to start. When the vine heights calls for it, I will zip tie tall wood stakes to the posts and keep the weave going.
I’m a huge far of rebar. I can pound it in more deeply, and it’s nice and rough to tie on to. The vertical steel conduit of the trellis is actually slipped over 6’ rebar and just rests on the ground.

Fortunately, I have a son-in-law who is a chemical engineer-slant-stay at home dad, and he is delighted to implement my latest garden fever dreams in exchange for off-loading the kids!
 

GVF

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i typically use a 6 ft fencce post and a cage. I grow 2 cherokee purples(wifes fav), 1 pink Brandywine(my fav), 1 Red BW, a cherry tomatoes that looks like a small Cherokee purple, a yellow, and a better boy or similar. The heirlooms grow out of the top of the cage and hang over the the top ring.
You eat the heirlooms, and the better boys don't seem very flavorful.
Cherokee Purple is one of the best. I've just skipped them the last 2-3 years to try others.
 

GVF

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I’m a huge far of rebar. I can pound it in more deeply, and it’s nice and rough to tie on to. The vertical steel conduit of the trellis is actually slipped over 6’ rebar and just rests on the ground.

Fortunately, I have a son-in-law who is a chemical engineer-slant-stay at home dad, and he is delighted to implement my latest garden fever dreams in exchange for off-loading the kids!
That gives me a great idea for next years posts. 2' rebar pounded about half way down. Electrical conduit slipped over at whatever height I want. Works for pole bean rows too. You're a genius.
 

VolNExile

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That gives me a great idea for next years posts. 2' rebar pounded about half way down. Electrical conduit slipped over at whatever height I want. Works for pole bean rows too. You're a genius.
lol Just someone too lazy to dig proper holes!

— also, I’m rotating the planting beds, and this setup is easy to disassemble for winter and set up in new beds next year!
 
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VolNExile

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Many in my area have had terrible luck the last few years with Cherokee purples due to disease. Randy Gardner at the NCSU Mountain Research Center is working on increasing disease resistance while maintaining taste and appearance, and I’m impatiently waiting.

This year I’m trellis growing (one of each, single stems):
Rutgers VF
Stupice (a Czech heirloom)
Mortgage Lifter
German Johnson
Costoluto Genovese (an Italian heirloom)
Black Krim (a Russian, er, Ukrainian heirloom)
Also:
SunGold (F1 hybrid cherry tomato) - 3 plants

Determinate cooking and canning tomatoes, 2 of each (these will be staked):
Roma (canning and sauce)
San Marzano (canning and sauce)
Principe Borghese (roasting and drying)

All are in bloom, and most have itty-bitty tomatoes, especially the SunGolds.

Kudos on the heirloom varietites. That's all I grow. Just for the fun of it and trying the different flavors of such. I used to throw in a Better Boy to make sure I got some. I always thought it to be one of the best tasting hybrids and dependable to grow. Yeah, you're right on hte air circulation using this method. It's supposed to really improve the maters. We'll both find out. This is where mine are now"
View attachment 463959
These were my choices this year (First 5)
1884
View attachment 463960
Dwarf Tasmanian Chocolate
View attachment 463961
Dwarf Velvet Night Cherry
View attachment 463962
San Marzano Redorta
View attachment 463965
Thorburn's Terra Cotta
View attachment 463966
2nd Five
A Grappoli D'Inverno
View attachment 463969
Costoluto Genovese
View attachment 463970
Dwarf Purple Reign
View attachment 463971
Mila
View attachment 463972
Orange Peach
View attachment 463973
 
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GVF

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Many in my area have had terrible luck the last few years with Cherokee purples due to disease. Randy Gardner at the NCSU Mountain Research Center is working on increasing disease resistance while maintaining taste and appearance, and I’m impatiently waiting.

This year I’m trellis growing (one of each, single stems):
Rutgers VF -One of my dad's favs
Stupice (a Czech heirloom)
Mortgage Lifter
German Johnson -I've done this one. Very good tomato. Had good luck with it.
Costoluto Genovese (an Italian heirloom) -Growing first time this year
Black Krim (a Russian, er, Ukrainian heirloom)
Also:
SunGold (F1 hybrid cherry tomato) - 3 plants -Grew this last year, maybe two years ago. Fantastic.

Determinate cooking and canning tomatoes, 2 of each (these will be staked):
Roma (canning and sauce)
San Marzano (canning and sauce) -I'm doing the Redorta version first time. Larger, supposedly tatier San Marzano variety.
Principe Borghese (roasting and drying) -I've got the seed, but haven't tried yet. If I had elected to do 11 tomatoes, it would have been planted.

All are in bloom, and most have itty-bitty tomatoes, especially the SunGolds.
 

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