Talk to us about.....an undeniable legend.

#1

DeusExMachina

"I aim to misbehave"
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May 15, 2009
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#1
Admittedly, the subject of this week's post wasn't my original idea. Names such as Seivers, Haynesworth, Henderson, and Spiva are still on the list, as as groups such as "The Colquitt family", and even games that many may be able to replay in their heads, like "The Miracle at South Bend" and "The 1998 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl". There may even be one about Doug Atkins, but I'm hesitant to do one about the big fella due to the outstanding threads already posted by @Sgt_Nick_Fury ( The Legend of Doug Atkins. ) and @Volosaurus rex ( The Legendary Exploits of Doug Atkins: Must Reading for young Vol Fans )

Blah blah blah, get to it Deuce. Got it.

In the annals of Tennessee history, the quarterback position has had some outstanding names attached to it. Some that will go down in history (Manning), some that will only be remembered by Vol fans (Clausen), and some that may go down in infamy (Bray). However, in 1971, a young man from Lee High School in Huntsville, Alabama signed with the Vols despite being drafted #4 overall in the MLB Draft by the Montreal Expos. Not only would he go on to do great things on the baseball diamond for the BaseVols (fun fact, he still holds the record for most games with a hit at 27), but his exploits on the football field are the true subject of this week's post (I hold no hard feelings if his baseball career is discussed as well, for the record).

The young man redshirted in '71, but once he took over as the starting quarterback in '72 (and in doing so, become the first ever Black QB to start in the SEC), he went on to amass a 25-9-2 regular season record, a 2-1 bowl record, and etch his name into the hearts and minds of Vols fans for all time.

Enough of my blathering, though. It's showtime, so without further ado....my Orange and White brethren and sisteren.......talk to us about "The Artful Dodger", Condredge Holloway.
 
#2
#2
I was able to watch Holloway on tv games often during his reign. After watching quarterbacks Dewey Warren and Bobby Scott in the late 60's, Condredge brought a different type of game to the Vols at that position than what we were used to seeing. A welcome addition, I might add as he was successful at Tennessee and helped pave the way for other talented black athletes to "Give their all for Tennessee". A true Vol legend that had not been forgotten by those of us that were fortunate to have watched him play.
 
#4
#4
He was before my time, but the man paved the way for black men to get the spotlight in the SEC. Back then there was a large contingency of talking heads who believed black players were not (insert veiled racism here) enough to play Qb and he proved them wrong.

Also those unis they wore are some of my favorite alt unis, especially the away jerseys.
 
#5
#5
Freshman were not allowed to play on the varsity, so his first season of eligibility was 1972. Many say that the ‘71 Vols win the NC if Holloway had been eligible.

I was fortunate to see him play, but I was four years old, so it’s not like I could explain much. I remember my family and their friends raving about how dynamic he was. Watching videos of him is fun. I’d love to see what guys like Holloway and Streater could do in today’s game.

He’s also a wonderful gentleman.
 
#6
#6
The flip side of the 1971 national championship argument is that, if memory serves me correctly, Bobby Scott said that he deeply regretted having not taken a redshirt earlier in his career. We had an outstanding defense that year, a good running game (almost 200 ypg), but struggled mightily at the quarterback position. On the season, our three quarterbacks completed only 39.7% of their passes, averaged 86.5 ypg passing, completed a mere 3 touchdown passes and threw 15 interceptions. See 1971 Tennessee Volunteers Stats | College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Solid quarterback play, which Scott would have given us, definitely would have elevated Tennessee into serious coinsidertion for the national title.
 
#7
#7
Saw Holloway as a Freshman play against Notre Dame in 1971 during an off-weekend in Knoxville, TN. He single-handedly defeated Notre Dame's number-one freshman class in the nation that day in lop-sided fashion. The play that epitomized what Holloway brought to the table was his incredible run against Georgia Tech in 1973 in Knoxville. 11 different players on Ga. Tech's defense touched him but could not tackle him. I was not there, but my parents were at the game while I stayed with my grand parents in Strawberry Plains.
 
#8
#8
Saw Holloway as a Freshman play against Notre Dame in 1971 during an off-weekend in Knoxville, TN. He single-handedly defeated Notre Dame's number-one freshman class in the nation that day in lop-sided fashion. The play that epitomized what Holloway brought to the table was his incredible run against Georgia Tech in 1973 in Knoxville. 11 different players on Ga. Tech's defense touched him but could not tackle him. I was not there, but my parents were at the game while I stayed with my grand parents in Strawberry Plains.

I was at that game, too!
 
#10
#10
Admittedly, the subject of this week's post wasn't my original idea. Names such as Seivers, Haynesworth, Henderson, and Spiva are still on the list, as as groups such as "The Colquitt family", and even games that many may be able to replay in their heads, like "The Miracle at South Bend" and "The 1998 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl". There may even be one about Doug Atkins, but I'm hesitant to do one about the big fella due to the outstanding threads already posted by @Sgt_Nick_Fury ( The Legend of Doug Atkins. ) and @Volosaurus rex ( The Legendary Exploits of Doug Atkins: Must Reading for young Vol Fans )

Blah blah blah, get to it Deuce. Got it.

In the annals of Tennessee history, the quarterback position has had some outstanding names attached to it. Some that will go down in history (Manning), some that will only be remembered by Vol fans (Clausen), and some that may go down in infamy (Bray). However, in 1971, a young man from Lee High School in Huntsville, Alabama signed with the Vols despite being drafted #4 overall in the MLB Draft by the Montreal Expos. Not only would he go on to do great things on the baseball diamond for the BaseVols (fun fact, he still holds the record for most games with a hit at 27), but his exploits on the football field are the true subject of this week's post (I hold no hard feelings if his baseball career is discussed as well, for the record).

The young man redshirted in '71, but once he took over as the starting quarterback in '72 (and in doing so, become the first ever Black QB to start in the SEC), he went on to amass a 25-9-2 regular season record, a 2-1 bowl record, and etch his name into the hearts and minds of Vols fans for all time.

Enough of my blathering, though. It's showtime, so without further ado....my Orange and White brethren and sisteren.......talk to us about "The Artful Dodger", Condredge Holloway.

I had a great Uncle that was on Von Braun's staff at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville during the late 60's and early 70's. He was a 1939 graduate of UT and at one time, president of the Huntsville UT Alumni Chapter. I remember Uncle Jack saying that Condredge's mother worked in the same department. I've always wondered if my Uncle Jack had any influence on Condredge signing with UT; I've also wondered if Condgedge knew my uncle.

Anyway, I do remember back in, I think, the fall of 1970 Huntsville Lee came to town to play our Franklin County Rebels. Holloway was Lee's QB and Robert Fraley was the Rebel's QB (who signed with Alabama). I was 10 years old and watching the game in the east end zone, the direction our offense was going. Trailing 17-14, we were driving late in the game. Fraley ran the ball down to Lee's 1 yard line, but had the wind knocked out of him and had to sit out 1 play. A sophomore QB (Johnny O'Neal who signed with Vanderbilt 2 years later) came in and promptly fumbled the snap and Lee recovered. Lee won 17-14.
 
#12
#12
My first game to see the Vols in person was 1974 (I was 11). Mr. Holloway was the QB. He was electric. Unfortunately, Maryland knew this and knocked him out of the game (late) but UT eventually won 7 - 3 with an interception on their own 2. It was freezing in Memphis that Dec. night - but I still remember.
 
#13
#13
Admittedly, the subject of this week's post wasn't my original idea. Names such as Seivers, Haynesworth, Henderson, and Spiva are still on the list, as as groups such as "The Colquitt family", and even games that many may be able to replay in their heads, like "The Miracle at South Bend" and "The 1998 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl". There may even be one about Doug Atkins, but I'm hesitant to do one about the big fella due to the outstanding threads already posted by @Sgt_Nick_Fury ( The Legend of Doug Atkins. ) and @Volosaurus rex ( The Legendary Exploits of Doug Atkins: Must Reading for young Vol Fans )

Blah blah blah, get to it Deuce. Got it.

In the annals of Tennessee history, the quarterback position has had some outstanding names attached to it. Some that will go down in history (Manning), some that will only be remembered by Vol fans (Clausen), and some that may go down in infamy (Bray). However, in 1971, a young man from Lee High School in Huntsville, Alabama signed with the Vols despite being drafted #4 overall in the MLB Draft by the Montreal Expos. Not only would he go on to do great things on the baseball diamond for the BaseVols (fun fact, he still holds the record for most games with a hit at 27), but his exploits on the football field are the true subject of this week's post (I hold no hard feelings if his baseball career is discussed as well, for the record).

The young man redshirted in '71, but once he took over as the starting quarterback in '72 (and in doing so, become the first ever Black QB to start in the SEC), he went on to amass a 25-9-2 regular season record, a 2-1 bowl record, and etch his name into the hearts and minds of Vols fans for all time.

Enough of my blathering, though. It's showtime, so without further ado....my Orange and White brethren and sisteren.......talk to us about "The Artful Dodger", Condredge Holloway.
I am so envious of Kenny Chesney in "The Color Orange," because in addition to spending all that time around Condredge Holloway, he got to catch a pass from him in Neyland Stadium. I used to dream of doing that.

My other favorite Condredge moments include.....
* breaking all those tackles to score against Georgia Tech in 1973
* coming back from the hospital to tie UCLA in 1974
* the origin of my screen name, the two-point conversion to beat Clemson later in the '74 season
* his election to the CFL Hall of Fame in 1999
 
#14
#14
* the origin of my screen name, the two-point conversion to beat Clemson later in the '74 season

You may be pleased to know that I have every intention of featuring Larry Seivers in one of these posts. He was actually one of the first names that popped into my head for this, tbh, I just haven't gotten to him yet.
 

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