PGA Tour question

#1

footballref

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#1
In today’s golf with electronic scoring and tv and all the technology we have, I wonder how hard would it be for the winner of a PGA major to sign an incorrect score card and get DQ’d?
 
#2

peaygolf

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#2
In today’s golf with electronic scoring and tv and all the technology we have, I wonder how hard would it be for the winner of a PGA major to sign an incorrect score card and get DQ’d?
It would be the biggest f up in sports history for that to happen today........
 
#4

05_never_again

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#4
In today’s golf with electronic scoring and tv and all the technology we have, I wonder how hard would it be for the winner of a PGA major to sign an incorrect score card and get DQ’d?
I don't see why it would be any more difficult than it has been in the past. It's the golfer's job to track his own score, right? If he forgot, is he permitted to ask somebody who could pull it up on their phone or something? If he is, that's the only way I could see it being easier to track your score.
 
#5

volfanbill

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#5
I don't see why it would be any more difficult than it has been in the past. It's the golfer's job to track his own score, right? If he forgot, is he permitted to ask somebody who could pull it up on their phone or something? If he is, that's the only way I could see it being easier to track your score.
your opponent tracks your score.

At the end, when you go to the scorer's table, you make sure what your opponent has for you is correct before signatures. To your point though, I don't know how everything we see as fans makes a difference. The players are still out there playing the course. Electronic scoring gets it wrong occasionally too. Signing for an incorrect scorecard doesn't happen a lot, but often enough. It happened this year at the Players, just not to the winner. I think it was during the first round.
 
#6

05_never_again

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#6
your opponent tracks your score.

At the end, when you go to the scorer's table, you make sure what your opponent has for you is correct before signatures. To your point though, I don't know how everything we see as fans makes a difference. The players are still out there playing the course. Electronic scoring gets it wrong occasionally too. Signing for an incorrect scorecard doesn't happen a lot, but often enough. It happened this year at the Players, just not to the winner. I think it was during the first round.
I thought they always tracked their own score and their opponents, but ultimately you were responsible for keeping your own score.

Either way, the fact that there's electronic scoring I don't think would make signing an incorrect scorecard any less rare. In big tournaments, there have been scoreboards up forever around the course showing the player's scores and guys have signed wrong ones.

It seems like an antiquated rule, but I still get the DQ because if the scorecard is wrong, then you and your opponent would have been playing with a wrong notion of what the score was for some portion of the round. That ultimately is why it is an automatic DQ, right?
 
#7

volfanbill

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#7
You’re only DQ’d for signing for a score under your actual score. IE, if you birdie the par w4 12th hole and sign for a par, you get the score you signed for (which would be one stroke higher than your score). If you par the hole and sign for a birdie (one stroke lower than your actual score), it’s considered cheating. Signatures represent the finality of a round and therefore are deemed to not be changeable. Therefore they DQ you instead of assessing a penalty. They could change the rule obviously, but it’s always been this way that I know of
 
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#9

golfballs

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#9
I thought they always tracked their own score and their opponents, but ultimately you were responsible for keeping your own score.

Either way, the fact that there's electronic scoring I don't think would make signing an incorrect scorecard any less rare. In big tournaments, there have been scoreboards up forever around the course showing the player's scores and guys have signed wrong ones.

It seems like an antiquated rule, but I still get the DQ because if the scorecard is wrong, then you and your opponent would have been playing with a wrong notion of what the score was for some portion of the round. That ultimately is why it is an automatic DQ, right?
You do track your own score, but you’re the scorekeeper for your opponent. The official scorecard has two lines. One for your opponent and one for you to keep your own. It’s typically perforated so you can tear it off and compare side by side w the score your competitor recorded. To sign an incorrect scorecard would require a failure on both you and your competitor.
 
#10

05_never_again

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#10
You do track your own score, but you’re the scorekeeper for your opponent. The official scorecard has two lines. One for your opponent and one for you to keep your own. It’s typically perforated so you can tear it off and compare side by side w the score your competitor recorded. To sign an incorrect scorecard would require a failure on both you and your competitor.
Ultimately though, why does it result in a DQ if unintentional? Just left over from the days where the player's own scorecard was the statement of record? I mean, a PGA pro would have to be nuts this day in age to purposely sign an incorrect scorecard that was lower than their actual score, with the intention of simply trying to post a lower score than what they actually shot.
 

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