Mullen and the NFL

#27

loservol

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#27
It's also a lot harder to win. There's been a bunch of coaches who won a lot at the college level wash out of the NFL.
Never really could understand the NFL appeal. Think it's difficult coaching college players? Well those same guys are now adults making more or nearly the same amount of money a year as the head coach. Not to mention all the research and travel that has to go into scouting potential player picks for the draft, only to see the guys you really wanted taken off the board by another team.

Just like college, you still have to toe the company/pc line, because of the spineless ginger who is charge of the league.
 
#28

RDU VOL#14

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#28
Never really could understand the NFL appeal. Think it's difficult coaching college players? Well those same guys are now adults making more or nearly the same amount of money a year as the head coach. Not to mention all the research and travel that has to go into scouting potential player picks for the draft, only to see the guys you really wanted taken off the board by another team.

Just like college, you still have to toe the company/pc line, because of the spineless ginger who is charge of the league.
I disagree. I think it has now become a bigger challenge coaching in college than the NFL. I think there is less travel, less worry about keeping 16 to 22 year old kids happy year round, less worry about kids getting into trouble/arrested and it reflecting poorly on you, more time with your family, in the SEC and other big time programs job security is not what it used to be. Not saying the NFL isn’t a grind, but the college game has evolved into this 24/7 constant recruiting world that doesn’t even stop after your players sign their NLI. I’m afraid of where the college game is going right now. Maybe that’s me being afraid of change, I don’t know, but right now I think we’re getting to the point where the toothpaste isn’t going back into the tube.
 
#29

SaintLouisVol

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#29
I disagree. I think it has now become a bigger challenge coaching in college than the NFL. I think there is less travel, less worry about keeping 16 to 22 year old kids happy year round, less worry about kids getting into trouble/arrested and it reflecting poorly on you, more time with your family, in the SEC and other big time programs job security is not what it used to be. Not saying the NFL isn’t a grind, but the college game has evolved into this 24/7 constant recruiting world that doesn’t even stop after your players sign their NLI. I’m afraid of where the college game is going right now. Maybe that’s me being afraid of change, I don’t know, but right now I think we’re getting to the point where the toothpaste isn’t going back into the tube.
I don't know that one is more difficult than the other, but I do believe the two jobs are very different because of recruiting at the college level. Recruiting and player development is a HUGE part of the college game. There is player development in the NFL as well, but it's not really the same.

There are college coaches that win simply because they are able to recruit talent a level far above the competition. If you are bigger, stronger and faster than most of the teams you play, it takes the X's and O's pressure off to some extent. They win because they recognize their strengths and the opponents weaknesses and are able to use simpler schemes to get the ball in the hands of the guys who can make the first guy miss and out run the rest of them. That's far less of an option in the NFL.

There's also college coaches that can scheme really well, develop players well fundamentally, and maximize the talent they are given to win. They may not recruit top 10 classes, but they field teams that play very hard and compete with anyone.

It's not an either/or proposition, all of them need to do both, but some are weaker on one side of the coin than the other.

Of course if you have a coaching staff that can do it all really well, like the Sabans and Meyers of the world, you become a perennial elite program.
 
#30

RDU VOL#14

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#30
I don't know that one is more difficult than the other, but I do believe the two jobs are very different because of recruiting at the college level. Recruiting and player development is a HUGE part of the college game. There is player development in the NFL as well, but it's not really the same.

There are college coaches that win simply because they are able to recruit talent a level far above the competition. If you are bigger, stronger and faster than most of the teams you play, it takes the X's and O's pressure off to some extent. They win because they recognize their strengths and the opponents weaknesses and are able to use simpler schemes to get the ball in the hands of the guys who can make the first guy miss and out run the rest of them. That's far less of an option in the NFL.

There's also college coaches that can scheme really well, develop players well fundamentally, and maximize the talent they are given to win. They may not recruit top 10 classes, but they field teams that play very hard and compete with anyone.

It's not an either/or proposition, all of them need to do both, but some are weaker on one side of the coin than the other.

Of course if you have a coaching staff that can do it all really well, like the Sabans and Meyers of the world, you become a perennial elite program.
You’re right, recruiting is definitely the biggest difference. The same can be said with College basketball as well. I think there has to be a complete buy in to it to be hugely successful. I think the coaches have to love teaching football, building and shaping their program. Saban, Spurrier, Meyer, Coach K, Roy Williams, Tom Izzo, Coach Barnes all kind of fall in that category to me. The Chip Kelly’s, Matt Rhule’s and others who I think love the schemetics, but tire from the recruiting aspects are probably best suited for the NFL. Phil Jackson always said there was no way he could ever go into anyone’s living room and sell his self like that, while we’ve seen how Saban and Spurrier have interacted at the pro level. We may see that with Urban too.

They all come with their different challenges. Personally, I aspire to be an NBA assistant coach. I can watch film and rebound with the best of them.
 
#31

SaintLouisVol

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#31
You’re right, recruiting is definitely the biggest difference. The same can be said with College basketball as well...
I think it is true to an even greater extreme in basketball. There's the coaches who live and die by the one-and-done signees, and the coaches who try to develop a program. Plus, you can sign one guy in CBB that can add 7-8 wins to your year.
 
#33

VolInNorthCack

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#33
Posted this in another thread. Didn't know this was here.

I work with a former Gator. I don't talk to him much obviously. Just happened to pass him in the hall and asked him about Mullen going to the NFL. He said if it happens, they have already talked to Fickell and Chadwell and both would accept the job if offered.
I don't really know the guy, don't know how plugged in to the program he still is. Just thought it was noteworthy.
 
#34

Lawrence Wright

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#34
Posted this in another thread. Didn't know this was here.

I work with a former Gator. I don't talk to him much obviously. Just happened to pass him in the hall and asked him about Mullen going to the NFL. He said if it happens, they have already talked to Fickell and Chadwell and both would accept the job if offered.
I don't really know the guy, don't know how plugged in to the program he still is. Just thought it was noteworthy.
Your friend has decent info.
 
#42

05_never_again

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#42
I disagree. I think it has now become a bigger challenge coaching in college than the NFL. I think there is less travel, less worry about keeping 16 to 22 year old kids happy year round, less worry about kids getting into trouble/arrested and it reflecting poorly on you, more time with your family, in the SEC and other big time programs job security is not what it used to be. Not saying the NFL isn’t a grind, but the college game has evolved into this 24/7 constant recruiting world that doesn’t even stop after your players sign their NLI. I’m afraid of where the college game is going right now. Maybe that’s me being afraid of change, I don’t know, but right now I think we’re getting to the point where the toothpaste isn’t going back into the tube.
I totally agree with this and have thought that for a long time.

Unless you're also the GM, head coaching in the NFL is a much more narrowly-focused job. I don't know if it is necessarily any easier, but it's more focused. You basically camp out in a film room all week with your guys to strategize and go to practice. With the exception of a young QB, your players are more or less already developed. It's extremely stressful and of course entirely performance-based, but there's no recruiting, less politics, and it is 100% about tactical football. You already have finished products as players, so it's up to you to figure out how to use them the best.

College coaches have to put up with an incredible about of BS. "BS" being defined as stuff that is secondary to what goes on on the field. If you're at a big time job, your career will ultimately hinge on whether or not you're able to convince 17 and 18-year-old divas to come to your school, and you have to go on essentially a 24-7-365 barnstorming tour in order to get them. CFB is a coach-driven sport, so you're expected to be the public face of the program, if not the entire state, and need to have at least decent media skills (especially if you aren't winning quite enough). The University itself is a political environment (way more than any NFL team is) and you need to have allies in the administration and among the boosters (again, especially if you're not winning enough).

NFL coaching is more of a "pure" football job, and I see why many coaches would prefer it to college. I love college football more than I love the NFL, but if I was in the coaching business I'd probably prefer working in the NFL.
 
#44

TheFlash1971

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#44
I totally agree with this and have thought that for a long time.

Unless you're also the GM, head coaching in the NFL is a much more narrowly-focused job. I don't know if it is necessarily any easier, but it's more focused. You basically camp out in a film room all week with your guys to strategize and go to practice. With the exception of a young QB, your players are more or less already developed. It's extremely stressful and of course entirely performance-based, but there's no recruiting, less politics, and it is 100% about tactical football. You already have finished products as players, so it's up to you to figure out how to use them the best.

College coaches have to put up with an incredible about of BS. "BS" being defined as stuff that is secondary to what goes on on the field. If you're at a big time job, your career will ultimately hinge on whether or not you're able to convince 17 and 18-year-old divas to come to your school, and you have to go on essentially a 24-7-365 barnstorming tour in order to get them. CFB is a coach-driven sport, so you're expected to be the public face of the program, if not the entire state, and need to have at least decent media skills (especially if you aren't winning quite enough). The University itself is a political environment (way more than any NFL team is) and you need to have allies in the administration and among the boosters (again, especially if you're not winning enough).

NFL coaching is more of a "pure" football job, and I see why many coaches would prefer it to college. I love college football more than I love the NFL, but if I was in the coaching business I'd probably prefer working in the NFL.
Pretty much hit the nail on the head with that one. Definetly would take NFL over college. 24/7 recruiting vs draft and free agency. No brainer.
 

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