Justin Fields reportedly has epilepsy

#5

Remy

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#5
Epilepsy is an electrical brain misfiring issue. Hopefully his is of the type that can be outgrown although I've not heard of that but I'm not a medico either, just been around a few folks with it. It would be interesting to know if he's allowed to drive a car, many states will not grant a license to a diagnosed epileptic. If he can't get a drivers license you going to let him be your franchise NFL QB? Time will tell. Hope nothing but the best for him.
 
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#6

ABINGDON VOL FAN

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#6
Epilepsy is an electrical brain misfiring issue. Hopefully his is of the type that can be outgrown although I've not heard of that but I'm not a medico either, just been around a few folks with it. It would be interesting to know if he's allowed to drive a car, many states will not grant a license to a diagnosed epileptic. If he can't get a drivers license you going to let him be your franchise NFL QB? Time will tell. Hope nothing but the best for him.
I saw something about 20 years ago with doctors removing a small cell or small section of the brain that was causing epileptic seizures and almost completely ending the seizures for the patient. It was experimental at the time but seemed promising. The patient was awake during the entire procedure. It was fascinating to watch at the time. I may try to look it up again.
 
#7

bamawriter

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#7
Epilepsy is an electrical brain misfiring issue. Hopefully his is of the type that can be outgrown although I've not heard of that but I'm not a medico either, just been around a few folks with it. It would be interesting to know if he's allowed to drive a car, many states will not grant a license to a diagnosed epileptic. If he can't get a drivers license you going to let him be your franchise NFL QB? Time will tell. Hope nothing but the best for him.
Some epileptics have non-convulsive seizures. I was diagnosed in high school. When I seized I smelled a phantom odor and sometimes got a weird sense of deja vu. No one would ever know I had the seizure. I didn't like the way medicine made me feel, so I just lived with the symptoms and grew out of it by the time I graduated college. Haven't had a seizure in 15 years.
 
#8

TheDirector

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#8
I saw something about 20 years ago with doctors removing a small cell or small section of the brain that was causing epileptic seizures and almost completely ending the seizures for the patient. It was experimental at the time but seemed promising. The patient was awake during the entire procedure. It was fascinating to watch at the time. I may try to look it up again.
That's amazing. I remember reading about a 5 year old girl who had a severe case and was having 300 seizures a week. The parents were looking for experimental treatments and ran across a company that was producing cbd hemp oil. The cbd oil reduced her seizures to 2-3 a month and the company changed their business from medical marijuana to just focusing on producing the oil. The company was so successful it went public.
 
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#9
I saw something about 20 years ago with doctors removing a small cell or small section of the brain that was causing epileptic seizures and almost completely ending the seizures for the patient. It was experimental at the time but seemed promising. The patient was awake during the entire procedure. It was fascinating to watch at the time. I may try to look it up again.
Another interesting procedure with astounding side-effects is found in what are called “split-brain” patients. To prevent seizures in some epileptic patients, their corpus callosum (the thin layer of neurons connecting the two halves) is surgically severed, separating the left & right hemispheres of the brain.

What is so weird about this is that studies have shown it produces TWO conscious agents in the brain, both with differing opinions and goals. Sometimes these “split-brain” patients suffer “alien hand syndrome” where one hand performs tasks not seemingly consciously willed. While one hand is trying to button a shirt, the other is trying to unbutton it. Really fascinating stuff with some pretty terrifying implications.
 
#10

Zues1

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#10
Another interesting procedure with astounding side-effects is found in what are called “split-brain” patients. To prevent seizures in some epileptic patients, their corpus callosum (the thin layer of neurons connecting the two halves) is surgically severed, separating the left & right hemispheres of the brain.

What is so weird about this is that studies have shown it produces TWO conscious agents in the brain, both with differing opinions and goals. Sometimes these “split-brain” patients suffer “alien hand syndrome” where one hand performs tasks not seemingly consciously willed. While one hand is trying to button a shirt, the other is trying to unbutton it. Really fascinating stuff with some pretty terrifying implications.
Wow
 
#11

ABINGDON VOL FAN

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#11
Another interesting procedure with astounding side-effects is found in what are called “split-brain” patients. To prevent seizures in some epileptic patients, their corpus callosum (the thin layer of neurons connecting the two halves) is surgically severed, separating the left & right hemispheres of the brain.

What is so weird about this is that studies have shown it produces TWO conscious agents in the brain, both with differing opinions and goals. Sometimes these “split-brain” patients suffer “alien hand syndrome” where one hand performs tasks not seemingly consciously willed. While one hand is trying to button a shirt, the other is trying to unbutton it. Really fascinating stuff with some pretty terrifying implications.
In the tv program I saw they would send electrical impulses to small areas and have the patient continuously talk. When they send a pulse thru a bad section , the patient would start slurring his words. They then removed the small section. Immediately afterward in the next few weeks the patients seizures dropped somewhere in the 90% range if my memory serves me right.
 
#12

vettefool

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#12
Per "Eleven Warriors"........ says he is managing it. Also says it is a family thing and most "outgrow" it in their 20's. Intersting, and wish the kid all the luck in the world.
Maybe this was JG’s problem, undiagnosed.
Hope Fields can ball out at the next level. recent tosu qb’s have not fared too great in the N F L.
 
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#13

Remy

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#13
I saw something about 20 years ago with doctors removing a small cell or small section of the brain that was causing epileptic seizures and almost completely ending the seizures for the patient. It was experimental at the time but seemed promising. The patient was awake during the entire procedure. It was fascinating to watch at the time. I may try to look it up again.
I had a friend who had two sons with epilepsy. One of them actually had the brain surgery you mentioned where they split his brain, and in his case it helped him tremendoiusly.
 
#14

ABINGDON VOL FAN

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#14
I had a friend who had two sons with epilepsy. One of them actually had the brain surgery you mentioned where they split his brain, and in his case it helped him tremendoiusly.
This wasn’t so much splitting the brain If I remember correctly but cutting out and removing small sections that were determined to be problem areas.
 
#15

cobbwebb0710

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#15
Some epileptics have non-convulsive seizures. I was diagnosed in high school. When I seized I smelled a phantom odor and sometimes got a weird sense of deja vu. No one would ever know I had the seizure. I didn't like the way medicine made me feel, so I just lived with the symptoms and grew out of it by the time I graduated college. Haven't had a seizure in 15 years.
Diagnosed when I was 8 even though every test came back with negative results. I never had a seizure while awake, always while I was asleep. Have two aunts and an uncle who have really violent seizures but their kids don’t have it. My dad doesn’t have it but I do? I haven’t had a seizure in over 20 years.
GBO!!
 
#16

SayUWantAreVOLution

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#16
This is interesting, given the "family history" with the potential to "outgrow" it, as to which form of epilepsy he has. There's a decent discussion at Eleven Warriors including a rumor of a collapse in practice in 2019, I think. While that seems to point to a grand mal type, I'm not convinced.

Epilepsy..... is a jacket too loose..... and I'll be watching his draft stock because the NFL teams will have a sharpened view, I assume, of his medical history and precise diagnosis.
 
#17

RDU VOL#14

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#17
Per "Eleven Warriors"........ says he is managing it. Also says it is a family thing and most "outgrow" it in their 20's. Intersting, and wish the kid all the luck in the world.
I hope he does well. I think he played an important part in getting the B1G leadership to understand that they could and needed to play football this past season.
 
#18

rjd970

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#18
Some epileptics have non-convulsive seizures. I was diagnosed in high school. When I seized I smelled a phantom odor and sometimes got a weird sense of deja vu. No one would ever know I had the seizure. I didn't like the way medicine made me feel, so I just lived with the symptoms and grew out of it by the time I graduated college. Haven't had a seizure in 15 years.
That is interesting, I had no idea.

I always thought it was just major episodes. You could still function while having a seizure?
 
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#20

cobbwebb0710

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#20
That is interesting, I had no idea.

I always thought it was just major episodes. You could still function while having a seizure?
One of my aunts has both types. She may start shaking and eyes rolling back in her head or she may be talking to you and just freeze with this really eerie, blank look in her eyes. It’s a crazy thing.
GBO!!
 

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