Justice Kavanaugh on the NCAA

#1

S.C. OrangeMan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2012
Messages
783
Likes
1,107
#1
"The NCAA couches its arguments for not paying student athletes in innocuous labels. But the labels cannot disguise the reality: The NCAA's business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America."

Justice Brett Kavanaugh
In his concurring opinion on the SCOTUS 9-0 NCAA vs Alston ruling.
 
#5
#5
"The NCAA couches its arguments for not paying student athletes in innocuous labels. But the labels cannot disguise the reality: The NCAA's business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America."

Justice Brett Kavanaugh
In his concurring opinion on the SCOTUS 9-0 NCAA vs Alston ruling.

This case was about a very different issue. The cases are always reviewed on their own merit. That is why some things that once were ruled upon are overturned with subsequent cases.

There will eventually be many lawsuits and the results will more than likely change the landscape of college sports - and when this all ends, there will be many students who no longer have the opportunity to play sports at the college level. Very few colleges make money on sports.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KHVol and GBOx2
#6
#6
"The NCAA couches its arguments for not paying student athletes in innocuous labels. But the labels cannot disguise the reality: The NCAA's business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America."

Justice Brett Kavanaugh
In his concurring opinion on the SCOTUS 9-0 NCAA vs Alston ruling.


Yea, but college football quite obviously isn't "any other industry" in America. Not sure why he would say that. It's a public (state) college. Somehow we've been playing college football for 100 years, with games televised for 60, and this apparently obvious problem in his view as never come up. Beyond that the players ARE getting paid.
 
#7
#7
Yea, but college football quite obviously isn't "any other industry" in America. Not sure why he would say that. It's a public (state) college. Somehow we've been playing college football for 100 years, with games televised for 60, and this apparently obvious problem in his view as never come up. Beyond that the players ARE getting paid.
The problem has never came up because until several years ago it was never challenged. Lawyers went to work and presented a case of exploitation and 100s of millions made by the NCAA and Universities. Big money ball. Touching on TV. They started signing 100m tv contracts to watch kids who were not being given a fair market value. When schools, conferences and the like started cashing those checks everything changed. Now the players want their piece. Education is not enough. Most are not playing school anyway. Nor were they really brought in to play school. They are only at these colleges for one reason and that is to win games. Everything else is just window dressing.
 
#8
#8
The problem has never came up because until several years ago it was never challenged. Lawyers went to work and presented a case of exploitation and 100s of millions made by the NCAA and Universities. Big money ball. Touching on TV. They started signing 100m tv contracts to watch kids who were not being given a fair market value. When schools, conferences and the like started cashing those checks everything changed. Now the players want their piece. Education is not enough. Most are not playing school anyway. Nor were they really brought in to play school. They are only at these colleges for one reason and that is to win games. Everything else is just window dressing.
I hope what comes out of all of this is players for Universities can choose to either strictly focus on the sports side with a caveat that they have to have some economics or business classes, so they can make informed decisions on what to do with the money they earn. If they end up being employees of the state via university, they should have the choice of going the traditional prep route with attending classes and whatever incentives that may go along with it, or choose to focus solely on their chosen sport and take business/economic classes until they go pro or move on with whatever comes next.
 
#10
#10
I hope what comes out of all of this is players for Universities can choose to either strictly focus on the sports side with a caveat that they have to have some economics or business classes, so they can make informed decisions on what to do with the money they earn. If they end up being employees of the state via university, they should have the choice of going the traditional prep route with attending classes and whatever incentives that may go along with it, or choose to focus solely on their chosen sport and take business/economic classes until they go pro or move on with whatever comes next.
That is an excellent idea!
 
#11
#11
I hope what comes out of all of this is players for Universities can choose to either strictly focus on the sports side with a caveat that they have to have some economics or business classes, so they can make informed decisions on what to do with the money they earn. If they end up being employees of the state via university, they should have the choice of going the traditional prep route with attending classes and whatever incentives that may go along with it, or choose to focus solely on their chosen sport and take business/economic classes until they go pro or move on with whatever comes next.
Let them get degrees in "sports". Pick another name, but allow the athletic activity to count for something.
 
  • Like
Reactions: S.C. OrangeMan
#12
#12
Let them get degrees in "sports". Pick another name, but allow the athletic activity to count for something.
It shows how far all this has gotten from the "prime directive" of the university which is education.

Let's give the guy academic credit for a course we'll call "Routes of the Wide Receiver" so we can still call them students. Ugh.
 
#13
#13
It shows how far all this has gotten from the "prime directive" of the university which is education.

Let's give the guy academic credit for a course we'll call "Routes of the Wide Receiver" so we can still call them students. Ugh.
Because sports aren't big, complex businesses with good careers, right?
 
#14
#14
Because sports aren't big, complex businesses with good careers, right?
Because UT is an educational institution.

I'll bet you hate those "fru fru" useless degrees universities hand out in "gender studies" because it's a pretty obscure and bizarre.

Maybe we should decide if UT is a "fru fru" sports school and drop everything but sports?
 
#15
#15
Exactly what those of us who have been paying attention to NIL have told the goobers who say "it has to be regulated"
How exactly do you regulate one's ability to make money of their name, image, or likeness constitutionally? You cannot hide behind the term "student-athelete." You have to explain it not label it.
 
#16
#16
Exactly what those of us who have been paying attention to NIL have told the goobers who say "it has to be regulated"
How exactly do you regulate one's ability to make money of their name, image, or likeness constitutionally? You cannot hide behind the term "student-athelete." You have to explain it not label it.
At least one of the posters here thinks we ought to move to a centralized/command economy, so maybe that's the answer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Voluble2
#17
#17
Because UT is an educational institution.

I'll bet you hate those "fru fru" useless degrees universities hand out in "gender studies" because it's a pretty obscure and bizarre.

Maybe we should decide if UT is a "fru fru" sports school and drop everything but sports?
False Dilemma, much?
 
#19
#19
I hope what comes out of all of this is players for Universities can choose to either strictly focus on the sports side with a caveat that they have to have some economics or business classes, so they can make informed decisions on what to do with the money they earn. If they end up being employees of the state via university, they should have the choice of going the traditional prep route with attending classes and whatever incentives that may go along with it, or choose to focus solely on their chosen sport and take business/economic classes until they go pro or move on with whatever comes next.
I think you would get support for an idea like this. I certainly believe athletes would benefit from it.
 
#20
#20
Got me on the hyperbole, but I don't think UT should offer a "Sports" major nor can they offer a Sports major which is only open to players.

Shunting athletes into specific courses just to keep them eligible has long been a no no.
It's not "shunting". It's "picking a major".

And...the athletes don't even have to go to class. Ask UNC basketball.
 
#21
#21
It's not "shunting". It's "picking a major".

And...the athletes don't even have to go to class. Ask UNC basketball.
Agreed. I cited the Cardele Jones quote a few days ago: "I ain't come here to play school. I come here to play football."

Truth in advertising: a Goddaughter is at UT "creating her own major" now. She's fresh faced, innocent in so many ways and all that and my "You're majoring in what?" just meets the enthusiasm of youth ready to conquer the world.

I'm old. I'm soft when they're so fired up and sure it's a good plan even when I can't see a clear J-O-B at the end.

As Heupel said today, most players never go further as players than college. That degree should be important and well thought out, but kids.......

More truth, it took me 2 major changes to get a clue also, but my changes were very early so it didn't hurt the process that badly.
 

VN Store



Back
Top