Fixing What's Wrong

#1

37620VOL

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#1
Humor me and let this ol' dummy play coaching consultant.

On offense:
Step 1 - Define a good shot. This team cannot shoot. There's not much you can do to drastically change a shooter's form mid-year. You've watched them all summer and fall, in practice and scrimmages - data should be available. Anyone that shoots under 30% from 3 no longer gets to shoot 3's unless it's to beat the clock. Per my observation, Brown and Davis have the green light to shoot away. Horston, Rennie, Green, and Burrell would need to show me in practice that they can hit 30% (I would think Horston and Rennie can based on watching their form). I would also talk to them all individually about what a good shot for them looks like. Define it for them so, in the game, they don't have to think about it. They shouldn't have to worry about whether coach thinks something is a good shot.

Step 2 - We need to get more quality opportunities in transition. Our set offense stinks, mainly because we do not have the shooters to stretch the defense and create space. For this reason, we need to emphasize our defense and transition game. Our fast break looks good when we have the advantage of 2on1 or 3on2. I've thought for many years that we have failed to incorporate a structured secondary break. What I'm talking about is even though you do not have the numbers on the fast break you can still take advantage of defensive confusion in transition if you consistently run your secondary break appropriately. Examples: Fast Break Basketball Offense - Carolina Secondary Break

Step 3 - Make sure our best offensive players get more quality looks. In our set offense, I would run less motion and design more set plays to get Davis and Horston open looks. Have these two attack until doubled, then find the open person and rotate the ball.

On defense:
Step 1 - Active hands that create fear. We do not threaten the ball with our hands. You don't have to get a steal every time, but if we can get "touches" on the ball, it creates fear in the opponent --- because getting your pocket picked is the ultimate humiliation.

Step 2 - Eye discipline. I sound like Pruitt now but our players tend to watch the ball or even worse look the other player in the eyes while defending. Easy fix, you have to watch the ball handlers midsection at all times. Otherwise, a head-fake or a ball-fake and you're burnt.

Step 3 - Hand discipline - aka how to not get called for a foul. Yes, the 25 handcheck fouls last game were ridiculous, but we just kept putting those hands out there. You can't put your forearm out at the top of the key; you can't handcheck 2 feet out from your body. Defenders have to keep hands in close to the body to hold, hook or push wide; learn what the ref will let you get away within the first 5 minutes and adjust your game accordingly. Bill Belichick spends an hour of player meetings and who knows how much staff time doing a rundown of the officials... breaking down what each one calls and what you can get away with. If we don't already do it, we need to be scouting the officials.

Step 4 - Create friction - do the little things to throw off the other offense. Bump, grind, lean, hold away from the ball where the refs are not looking as much. Jam the cutters, make them run wide of their intended path - don't just react to their motion, disrupt it.

Thoughts?
 
#2

cwbytruckers

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#2
I hope to think after game 1 to game 2 Coach will make adjustments. Something Holly did not understand. Harper will not be a hands on hip WTF do I do kind of coach. Unlike Holly teams by January you will see a vastly different team. I'm confident she will make them better.
 
#3

cardvolfan

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#3
I hope to think after game 1 to game 2 Coach will make adjustments. Something Holly did not understand. Harper will not be a hands on hip WTF do I do kind of coach. Unlike Holly teams by January you will see a vastly different team. I'm confident she will make them better.
Your "hands on hips" analogy was spot on. She didn't have a clue, did she?
 
#5
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#5
Humor me and let this ol' dummy play coaching consultant.

On offense:
Step 1 - Define a good shot. This team cannot shoot. There's not much you can do to drastically change a shooter's form mid-year. You've watched them all summer and fall, in practice and scrimmages - data should be available. Anyone that shoots under 30% from 3 no longer gets to shoot 3's unless it's to beat the clock. Per my observation, Brown and Davis have the green light to shoot away. Horston, Rennie, Green, and Burrell would need to show me in practice that they can hit 30% (I would think Horston and Rennie can based on watching their form). I would also talk to them all individually about what a good shot for them looks like. Define it for them so, in the game, they don't have to think about it. They shouldn't have to worry about whether coach thinks something is a good shot.

Everyone on the team needs to be at least 20% shooting 3's,,,with only those shooting above 30% getting a green light on any open look...Do the math,,,,20% threes ='s 30% twos (2 threes = 6 pts. and 3 twos = six pts. You can't expect everyone to hit above 30, but you can expect 10-20% if by nothing else, blind luck!

Any made shot is a good shot...it the "BAD SHOT" that has to be defined

Step 2 - We need to get more quality opportunities in transition. Our set offense stinks, mainly because we do not have the shooters to stretch the defense and create space. For this reason, we need to emphasize our defense and transition game. Our fast break looks good when we have the advantage of 2on1 or 3on2. I've thought for many years that we have failed to incorporate a structured secondary break. What I'm talking about is even though you do not have the numbers on the fast break you can still take advantage of defensive confusion in transition if you consistently run your secondary break appropriately. Examples: Fast Break Basketball Offense - Carolina Secondary Break

The team needs a session of 9-man or 11-man with coach Jumper...I will give you 2on1 beasts!

Step 3 - Make sure our best offensive players get more quality looks. In our set offense, I would run less motion and design more set plays to get Davis and Horston open looks. Have these two attack until doubled, then find the open person and rotate the ball.

Set plays are good for one time per game, run it more than once and I will eat your lunch on the next times you run it because it most often ends the same way so all i have to do is anticipate the ending....Motion offense is more or less "set plays (movements) with optional set plays within them. "Motion" is designed to get a team moving and then taking advantages of that movement by finding creases or flaws in the designed paths in the motion, and then exploiting them.

On defense:
Step 1 - Active hands that create fear. We do not threaten the ball with our hands. You don't have to get a steal every time, but if we can get "touches" on the ball, it creates fear in the opponent --- because getting your pocket picked is the ultimate humiliation.

This we totally agree on. When I teach defense, I teach what I call "foosball defense". It incorporates : baiting, jab-stepping, arbitrary swipes in the path of the cross-over, and other tactics, ,,, sort of,,, anticipation-moves designed with programmed recoil corrections.

(For example: You are guarding the ball...the opposing player has the ball on their hip, in a triple threat..You move your left hand and lean slightly to the left to make the BHer think you are expecting them to go strongside,,,they will most often go to the cross-over if the see you shading or leaning left...so, within that same blink, you take an arbitrary swipe in the path of the crossover and drop-step your right foot to be ready for the cross-over...now you have confused the BHer.(you are guarding their strongside yet swiping the path of a crossover...You make them start thinking,,and we all know, there's no thinking in basketball....Most everything inside the arc is reactions.



Step 2 - Eye discipline. I sound like Pruitt now but our players tend to watch the ball or even worse look the other player in the eyes while defending. Easy fix, you have to watch the ball handlers midsection at all times. Otherwise, a head-fake or a ball-fake and you're burnt.

Good call here to. Most of the ETSU's and CN's open looks came from one of our kids following the ball movement and losing their assignments movement in the process...This is all about focus and training...Calling switches and if there is no switch, hedging the screener...communication.

I also agree about head and ball fakes. What I call "offensive set-up moves" moves that setup your drive or shot....This is something I key on when teaching one on one offense. These atheletes in college are quicker and that can be used against them. A simple ball-swing to get your opponent leaning the wrong way and straight to the hoop!


Step 3 - Hand discipline - aka how to not get called for a foul. Yes, the 25 handcheck fouls last game were ridiculous, but we just kept putting those hands out there. You can't put your forearm out at the top of the key; you can't handcheck 2 feet out from your body. Defenders have to keep hands in close to the body to hold, hook or push wide; learn what the ref will let you get away within the first 5 minutes and adjust your game accordingly. Bill Belichick spends an hour of player meetings and who knows how much staff time doing a rundown of the officials... breaking down what each one calls and what you can get away with. If we don't already do it, we need to be scouting the officials.

Here is where the coach has to put her big girl panties on.
I watched one of the televised encounters Kellie had with a ref.
She was doe-eyed and sweet when she talked with the ref.
Nodded her head submissively and said yes sir!
When she should have reemed his butt!
A coach has to show their team they will fight just as hard as they expect their athletes to!
One way of doing this is working the refs.
Yes there is a time to be nice and yes,
there is a time not to be nice.


Step 4 - Create friction - do the little things to throw off the other offense. Bump, grind, lean, hold away from the ball where the refs are not looking as much. Jam the cutters, make them run wide of their intended path - don't just react to their motion, disrupt it.

Yes

Thoughts?
offense is like water, it has to flow first
to reach it's destination
 
Last edited:
#8

StrangeVol

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#8
Humor me and let this ol' dummy play coaching consultant.

On offense:
Step 1 - Define a good shot. This team cannot shoot. There's not much you can do to drastically change a shooter's form mid-year. You've watched them all summer and fall, in practice and scrimmages - data should be available. Anyone that shoots under 30% from 3 no longer gets to shoot 3's unless it's to beat the clock. Per my observation, Brown and Davis have the green light to shoot away. Horston, Rennie, Green, and Burrell would need to show me in practice that they can hit 30% (I would think Horston and Rennie can based on watching their form). I would also talk to them all individually about what a good shot for them looks like. Define it for them so, in the game, they don't have to think about it. They shouldn't have to worry about whether coach thinks something is a good shot.

Step 2 - We need to get more quality opportunities in transition. Our set offense stinks, mainly because we do not have the shooters to stretch the defense and create space. For this reason, we need to emphasize our defense and transition game. Our fast break looks good when we have the advantage of 2on1 or 3on2. I've thought for many years that we have failed to incorporate a structured secondary break. What I'm talking about is even though you do not have the numbers on the fast break you can still take advantage of defensive confusion in transition if you consistently run your secondary break appropriately. Examples: Fast Break Basketball Offense - Carolina Secondary Break

Step 3 - Make sure our best offensive players get more quality looks. In our set offense, I would run less motion and design more set plays to get Davis and Horston open looks. Have these two attack until doubled, then find the open person and rotate the ball.

On defense:
Step 1 - Active hands that create fear. We do not threaten the ball with our hands. You don't have to get a steal every time, but if we can get "touches" on the ball, it creates fear in the opponent --- because getting your pocket picked is the ultimate humiliation.

Step 2 - Eye discipline. I sound like Pruitt now but our players tend to watch the ball or even worse look the other player in the eyes while defending. Easy fix, you have to watch the ball handlers midsection at all times. Otherwise, a head-fake or a ball-fake and you're burnt.

Step 3 - Hand discipline - aka how to not get called for a foul. Yes, the 25 handcheck fouls last game were ridiculous, but we just kept putting those hands out there. You can't put your forearm out at the top of the key; you can't handcheck 2 feet out from your body. Defenders have to keep hands in close to the body to hold, hook or push wide; learn what the ref will let you get away within the first 5 minutes and adjust your game accordingly. Bill Belichick spends an hour of player meetings and who knows how much staff time doing a rundown of the officials... breaking down what each one calls and what you can get away with. If we don't already do it, we need to be scouting the officials.

Step 4 - Create friction - do the little things to throw off the other offense. Bump, grind, lean, hold away from the ball where the refs are not looking as much. Jam the cutters, make them run wide of their intended path - don't just react to their motion, disrupt it.

Thoughts?
I think you make a lot of good points and were it January I'd probably give you an upvote, but I think you're about 2 months early. We are ONE game into the season and the team needs time to gel and work out their issues and I bet Coach Kellie is working on many of the things you mention. The bad news is, it's easier to say somethng than it is to do it. Review your post in mid-January and see if you still think all those ideas are still appropriate. :)
 
#9

Volfan2012

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#9
Humor me and let this ol' dummy play coaching consultant.

On offense:
Step 1 - Define a good shot. This team cannot shoot. There's not much you can do to drastically change a shooter's form mid-year. You've watched them all summer and fall, in practice and scrimmages - data should be available. Anyone that shoots under 30% from 3 no longer gets to shoot 3's unless it's to beat the clock. Per my observation, Brown and Davis have the green light to shoot away. Horston, Rennie, Green, and Burrell would need to show me in practice that they can hit 30% (I would think Horston and Rennie can based on watching their form). I would also talk to them all individually about what a good shot for them looks like. Define it for them so, in the game, they don't have to think about it. They shouldn't have to worry about whether coach thinks something is a good shot.

Step 2 - We need to get more quality opportunities in transition. Our set offense stinks, mainly because we do not have the shooters to stretch the defense and create space. For this reason, we need to emphasize our defense and transition game. Our fast break looks good when we have the advantage of 2on1 or 3on2. I've thought for many years that we have failed to incorporate a structured secondary break. What I'm talking about is even though you do not have the numbers on the fast break you can still take advantage of defensive confusion in transition if you consistently run your secondary break appropriately. Examples: Fast Break Basketball Offense - Carolina Secondary Break

Step 3 - Make sure our best offensive players get more quality looks. In our set offense, I would run less motion and design more set plays to get Davis and Horston open looks. Have these two attack until doubled, then find the open person and rotate the ball.

On defense:
Step 1 - Active hands that create fear. We do not threaten the ball with our hands. You don't have to get a steal every time, but if we can get "touches" on the ball, it creates fear in the opponent --- because getting your pocket picked is the ultimate humiliation.

Step 2 - Eye discipline. I sound like Pruitt now but our players tend to watch the ball or even worse look the other player in the eyes while defending. Easy fix, you have to watch the ball handlers midsection at all times. Otherwise, a head-fake or a ball-fake and you're burnt.

Step 3 - Hand discipline - aka how to not get called for a foul. Yes, the 25 handcheck fouls last game were ridiculous, but we just kept putting those hands out there. You can't put your forearm out at the top of the key; you can't handcheck 2 feet out from your body. Defenders have to keep hands in close to the body to hold, hook or push wide; learn what the ref will let you get away within the first 5 minutes and adjust your game accordingly. Bill Belichick spends an hour of player meetings and who knows how much staff time doing a rundown of the officials... breaking down what each one calls and what you can get away with. If we don't already do it, we need to be scouting the officials.

Step 4 - Create friction - do the little things to throw off the other offense. Bump, grind, lean, hold away from the ball where the refs are not looking as much. Jam the cutters, make them run wide of their intended path - don't just react to their motion, disrupt it.

Thoughts?
I would like to see more drives to the basket more mid range shots and more plays that get the ball inside. We need to get to the foul line more even though we were terrible in the last game when we got there. We've proven that were not very good from the three and hopefully we will at least wait until we have players in position to rebound before we throw one up. Quick shots just lead to more possessions for the opponent so until we think were more efficient on offense we need to use more clock. We definitely need to do it with a double digit lead some of those shots we took so early in the shot clock were detrimental to winning the game.

Defense- heard that we wanted to use a full court trap defense but team was not effective enough to learn it well enough to use it in the ETSU game. I suspect we'll see some of that to try to create turnovers once the team practices enough that Coach Kellie feels confident enough that it will work. I think Davis, Green, Burrell, and Horston should be racking some steals and forcing some turnovers maybe they will as the season progresses. I like the effort were showing rebounding the ball. I think Coach Kellie wants to use the man to man defense mostly and that is fine if you can guard everyone. There is always someone on the other team that you need to force the ball out of their hand and limit their shots as much as possible.
 
#10

Orange Maniac

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#10
People need to keep in mind how much time she has had to work with the players. Yes, she has been here a few months but the coaches are limited to how much they can work with the team. The coaching of this team is just barely getting started. It's not like a few new players have to blend in with an established group and system. Everything is new. It takes time to get the system in place and the machine working. I know it's hard but we need to be patient. Time will tell if KJH can cut it or not, but it's way too early to judge anything yet.
 
#11
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#11
I think you make a lot of good points and were it January I'd probably give you an upvote, but I think you're about 2 months early. We are ONE game into the season and the team needs time to gel and work out their issues and I bet Coach Kellie is working on many of the things you mention. The bad news is, it's easier to say somethng than it is to do it. Review your post in mid-January and see if you still think all those ideas are still appropriate. :)
I believe in Coach Kellie
I am 100% behind her
I am also a coach and will hold her to the standards I would make for myself

I'll be around mid January
, March, even!!
I will give input in on every game.
Maybe no one sees it or reads it from the UT staff
maybe someone at UT does
Doesn't matter to me
I write for myself and for those who want to see
a coach's view on a fan's site
 
#14

Volfan2012

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#14
After two games offensively some players doing the job and others yet to get going.

Green 26 points on 27 shots is fair needs to do better.
Horston 21 points on 15 shots is great efficiency
Key 19 points on 15 shots is great to.
Davis 17 on 23 is an F she comes around were gonna hit a different gear.
Burrell 15 on 16 is fair efficiency
Brown 13 on 11 shots is good
KK 9 on 11 she should lose minutes considering her play thus far
McCoy 4 on 6 shots below average D
Harris 4 on 3 shots is good
Saunders 2 on a shots
Rennie 3 on 5 shots
Massengill 2 on 7 shots terrible she has to guard and distribute shooting is not her thing at leas thus far.

As a team 135 points on 140 shots not very good offense. Need Davis and Green to pick their games up. Will be happy if Key and Horston stay the same and shoot more. Burrell and Brown seem to be the next two that should play a lot.
 
#15

mike099

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#15
For the ND game, the two players that have to pick it up in the starting lineup are Davis and Green. They start 2 freshmen and we start 2 freshmen and they will probably play about the same level. Key does have a nice shot and keeps the ball high. I like Harris coming in for Key especially on defense. She seems quicker and in better shape than KK.
 
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#19

Volfan2012

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#19
The most glaring individual fix is to slow down Burrell. You cannot continue to dribble into the defense out of control. She has a sweet stroke on her shot, so take some mid range jumpers.
Rae could really help the team if she could get in the right flow. Right now she is just wild takes to many chances. Horston does a little of that too. Those two are the ones that could improve the most to make this team dynamic. I think Key is doing a marvelous job in her first three games as a freshman averaging 10 points-7.3 rebounds-4 blocks per game while shooting .591 from the field. If she can do that line all season she should be All Freshman class.
 
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#20

cwbytruckers

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#20
Rae could really help the team if she could get in the right flow. Right now she is just wild takes to many chances. Horston does a little of that too. Those two are the ones that could improve the most to make this team dynamic. I think Key is doing a marvelous job in her first three games as a freshman averaging 10 points-7.3 rebounds-4 blocks per game while shooting .591 from the field. If she can do that line all season she should be All Freshman class.
Key is my favorite player through 3 games. Soft on the eyes also. Her smile is infectious. She will be all sec by her junior and senior years.
 

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