Chick-Fil-A

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I work for a credit union, and our upper management is obsessed with CFA's customer service model. They have literally gone down to their corporate office in Atlanta to learn their philosophy and techniques. One of the big mantras is "if you're not serving chicken, you're serving someone who is." They said that the first thing every employee learns, including all levels of management, is how to clean the bathrooms.
 

GVF

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I work for a credit union, and our upper management is obsessed with CFA's customer service model. They have literally gone down to their corporate office in Atlanta to learn their philosophy and techniques. One of the big mantras is "if you're not serving chicken, you're serving someone who is." They said that the first thing every employee learns, including all levels of management, is how to clean the bathrooms.
In textiles, fresh out of grad school with an MBA and hired as a production supervisor, my first two weeks I did nothing but make friends with a pair of brooms. After which I spent 10 months learning to run every job in my area before I was delegated to my shift.
 

BAJAvol

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I work for a credit union, and our upper management is obsessed with CFA's customer service model. They have literally gone down to their corporate office in Atlanta to learn their philosophy and techniques. One of the big mantras is "if you're not serving chicken, you're serving someone who is." They said that the first thing every employee learns, including all levels of management, is how to clean the bathrooms.
I think we may work for the same company haha.
 

GVF

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Jeez. I cleaned a few bathrooms in college and high school jobs but I've never heard of anyone asking professionals to do that.
It's a simple philosophy. You know what it takes for your direct reports to perform their jobs, and how long each task should take. How do you oversee responsibilities you have no clue how to perform. What do you do if you're short handed, can't get anyone in, and you don't know s***. Subordinates don't expect "professionals" to run their jobs, but you get a lot of mileage out of them knowing you will get your hands dirty when necessary.
 

VolunteerHillbilly

Spike Drinks, Not Trees
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It's a simple philosophy. You know what it takes for your direct reports to perform their jobs, and how long each task should take. How do you oversee responsibilities you have no clue how to perform. What do you do if you're short handed, can't get anyone in, and you don't know s***. Subordinates don't expect "professionals" to run their jobs, but you get a lot of mileage out of them knowing you will get your hands dirty when necessary.
I can see the value in that for a in-store manager position. If I was going to go be in-house counsel for CFA and the first thing they asked me to do was work in a store and clean bathrooms, I'd probably wonder why.
 

GVF

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I can see the value in that for a in-store manager position. If I was going to go be in-house counsel for CFA and the first thing they asked me to do was work in a store and clean bathrooms, I'd probably wonder why.
Same reasons. They just feel that all should know the inner workings of a location regardless. Personally, I think it rids their culture of the better than your position attitudes. Having gone through the training as I did in my early years as a mfg mgr, it helped me stay on my associates level. I never put myself above them, and it had everything to do with my training. As I was told, let 3 or 4 be absent and you'll find out who runs the place.
 

DancingOutlaw

No sloppy, slimy eggs plz
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I can see the value in that for a in-store manager position. If I was going to go be in-house counsel for CFA and the first thing they asked me to do was work in a store and clean bathrooms, I'd probably wonder why.
My wife’s friend works at 7/11 in Dallas and they have a store in the bottom of the tower. New employees have to work so many hours in that store when they start.
 

VolunteerHillbilly

Spike Drinks, Not Trees
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Same reasons. They just feel that all should know the inner workings of a location regardless. Personally, I think it rids their culture of the better than your position attitudes. Having gone through the training as I did in my early years as a mfg mgr, it helped me stay on my associates level. I never put myself above them, and it had everything to do with my training. As I was told, let 3 or 4 be absent and you'll find out who runs the place.
Whatever works for them I suppose. I know this will sound dickish, but I went to college and law school so I would not have to clean bathrooms and deal with John Q Public. Guessing many others feel the same way. Doesn't make anyone better than another to apply the good ole law of economics that everyone should do best what they do best.
 

VolNExile

I’d rather be mocked than pitied!
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Whatever works for them I suppose. I know this will sound dickish, but I went to college and law school so I would not have to clean bathrooms and deal with John Q Public. Guessing many others feel the same way. Doesn't make anyone better than another to apply the good ole law of economics that everyone should do best what they do best.
I disagree. There are plenty of jobs that are critical to the business’s success of which the managers, often inexperienced graduates with MBAs, know nothing. Changes are made in corporate culture and direction with no real understanding of how things work (“institutional history.”)

DH left corporate America after one too many new bosses making changes for change’s sake, in between updating their LinkedIn accounts in preparation for their next job jump, leaving destruction in their wakes.

And managers get a ton more respect from the floor-moppers and order-takers when they’ve walked the walk, even as a manager trainee.
 
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pismonque

Bury me in Orcadian peat
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Whatever works for them I suppose. I know this will sound dickish, but I went to college and law school so I would not have to clean bathrooms and deal with John Q Public. Guessing many others feel the same way. Doesn't make anyone better than another to apply the good ole law of economics that everyone should do best what they do best.
How about if we just require that attorneys who do TV commercials have to clean toilets?
 

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