2021 5-Star Makur Maker Commits to Howard

#52

Rrcox1951

I’m really Trump, but everything I say is a lie...
Joined
Feb 26, 2018
Messages
66
Likes
89
#52
I'm just curious why this Makur dude is such a hot topic on a Tennessee basketball forum.
Well, there are over 350 other schools that have Division 1 basketball (besides UT), occasionally a nationally relevant story occurs at one of them, and, let’s face it, it’s only early July! There’s only a few threads regarding UT worth discussing right now, and the topics of next year’s lineup and/or recruiting can only go so far. When a nationally relevant story comes along, it is only natural that folks want to discuss it.
 
#53

k-town_king

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2008
Messages
13,108
Likes
7,733
#53
With so many people wanting to cancel anything having to do with America’s (“racist”) history, It’s ironic for those same people to promote colleges which were created due to segregation. Especially when it seems like the intent is to become further segregated. I thought that was a bad thing. It would be great if they realized that instead we can focus on the good in our history and learn from the bad and grow stronger from it. HBCU’s could serve as that example. Colleges which emphasize education as the great equalizer - graduates that go on to prove that anyone can make it in this country regardless of skin color.

Well, there are over 350 other schools that have Division 1 basketball (besides UT), occasionally a nationally relevant story occurs at one of them, and, let’s face it, it’s only early July! There’s only a few threads regarding UT worth discussing right now, and the topics of next year’s lineup and/or recruiting can only go so far. When a nationally relevant story comes along, it is only natural that folks want to discuss it.
Look at the posts and see the ignorance, anger and disdain some some seem to have about him attending an HBCU. If he was going to a non HBCU small school they wouldn't care.

Draw your own conclusions.
 
#54

golfballs

Love it or leave it
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
64,781
Likes
35,950
#54
Look at the posts and see the ignorance, anger and disdain some some seem to have about him attending an HBCU. If he was going to a non HBCU small school they wouldn't care.

Draw your own conclusions.
Do you not see the irony in a society where everything having to do with America’s “racist” history must be burned down yet schools that were established due to segregation are now being promoted by some as a way to address “systemic racism”
 
Likes: StrangeVol
#55

cncchris33

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
22,525
Likes
16,309
#55
Do you not see the irony in a society where everything having to do with America’s “racist” history must be burned down yet schools that were established due to segregation are now being promoted by some as a way to address “systemic racism”
I guess I can see both sides of the coin in the larger picture of this debate, but to your point, the African-American community continuing to celebrate and promote HBCUs seems akin to celebrating the segregated historically black high schools they were forced to attend, or the separate bathrooms and water fountains they were forced to use, and were so happy to see abolished.

The flip side of that, is that the African-American community likely views that separation and overcoming the odds stacked against people of color thru HBCUs as a badge of honor and a symbol of the hard work and determination towards earning a degree by virtue of the same HBCUs that people of color before them fought hard to establish and maintain as they pursued justice and equality for African-Americans to no longer be forced to attend ONLY those schools, but to have the right and freedom to choose whichever school, HBCU, or not, that they decided was their best option.

I would have likely not seen that side of things 6 months ago, and would have heavily sided with you, but the recent events our nation has faced have challenged me to view events and ideals thru more than just my mind’s traditional lense. I don’t/won’t always agree with all of the actions/motives of the BLM movement, but I at least try to challenge myself to see the motive from another perspective, which at 40 years old, takes a lot of focus and reprogramming.
 
#57

Purple Tiger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2018
Messages
4,622
Likes
1,397
#57
Do you not see the irony in a society where everything having to do with America’s “racist” history must be burned down yet schools that were established due to segregation are now being promoted by some as a way to address “systemic racism”
I'd say schools like Fisk and Howard were formed in spite of segregation.
 
Likes: k-town_king
#58

golfballs

Love it or leave it
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
64,781
Likes
35,950
#58
I guess I can see both sides of the coin in the larger picture of this debate, but to your point, the African-American community continuing to celebrate and promote HBCUs seems akin to celebrating the segregated historically black high schools they were forced to attend, or the separate bathrooms and water fountains they were forced to use, and were so happy to see abolished.

The flip side of that, is that the African-American community likely views that separation and overcoming the odds stacked against people of color thru HBCUs as a badge of honor and a symbol of the hard work and determination towards earning a degree by virtue of the same HBCUs that people of color before them fought hard to establish and maintain as they pursued justice and equality for African-Americans to no longer be forced to attend ONLY those schools, but to have the right and freedom to choose whichever school, HBCU, or not, that they decided was their best option.

I would have likely not seen that side of things 6 months ago, and would have heavily sided with you, but the recent events our nation has faced have challenged me to view events and ideals thru more than just my mind’s traditional lense. I don’t/won’t always agree with all of the actions/motives of the BLM movement, but I at least try to challenge myself to see the motive from another perspective, which at 40 years old, takes a lot of focus and reprogramming.
Some people think my original post was hateful or ignorant of HBCU’s which it was not. I think they should be uniquely qualified to serve as an example of the great equalizer of education - an example where good things can come from a bad past (segregation). However based on the current climate, that concept is not very popular as things from our past are being burned down as if people are being victimized by them today. So the sentiment behind some people to call on athletes to attend those schools strikes me as an “us against them” mentality which of course is divisive and when it comes to something innate like the color of your skin is even more insidious. Also let me say I’m not taking about this kid in particular, but the overall racial tension and response happening today. Interesting though that Howard was the only HBCU that made his final list. Seems like it was done to make a statement.
 
#59

pimo1

Sad Panda
Joined
Apr 23, 2010
Messages
2,713
Likes
2,059
#59
If you think the intention of those who attend HBCUs is to segregate, then you really have no clue. Why don't you ask someone who attends, or has attended one ?! I doubt you hear the word "segregate" come up in your conversation.
Being on of those that did (TSU) I'll say you're spot on. Are there people that go there with that in mind sure. But they are the minority. The same is true in most situations. Is everyone at BYU Mormon? If everyone at Tennessee Wesleyan Christian? Nope in face most are not. I enrolled at TSU not knowing what an HBCU was really.it was close to home even though I'd been accepted and had full rides to many schools (including Howard). I was familiar with Nashville it was far enough away from home (Chattanooga) but not too far. I had no interest in going to Fisk or Vandy (Private schools) so TSU is where I went and I learned a lot there. Given where I came from I think it was the right choice and somewhere like say UT would have been too much of a culture shock to 16 year old me. To me going there was like a transition I needed and segregation was the exact opposite of what I got there.
 
#60

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
5,002
Likes
4,869
#60
Being on of those that did (TSU) I'll say you're spot on. Are there people that go there with that in mind sure. But they are the minority. The same is true in most situations. Is everyone at BYU Mormon? If everyone at Tennessee Wesleyan Christian? Nope in face most are not. I enrolled at TSU not knowing what an HBCU was really.it was close to home even though I'd been accepted and had full rides to many schools (including Howard). I was familiar with Nashville it was far enough away from home (Chattanooga) but not too far. I had no interest in going to Fisk or Vandy (Private schools) so TSU is where I went and I learned a lot there. Given where I came from I think it was the right choice and somewhere like say UT would have been too much of a culture shock to 16 year old me. To me going there was like a transition I needed and segregation was the exact opposite of what I got there.
Do HCBU’s like TSU now have racially diverse student bodies?
 
#62

GBOplayer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
67
Likes
154
#62
I believe the whole idea is that if you are already a projected top 10 pick coming out of high school, what is the point of spending your one year of college at a well known "privileged" college like Duke, UNC, etc. Those colleges don't need a higb profile player to play for them. Those schools are a brand by themselves. These top 10 projected one and done players should instead play their one year at HBCU or some lesser known college, that way they can help promote some of these smaller schools. They don't need the development that can be offered by the big time schools, and they don't need the publicity. They will bring the publiciy on their own to the HBCU college they sign with. They will also still be drafted in the top 10 after their one year regardless based on their potential.
 
#63

cncchris33

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
22,525
Likes
16,309
#63
I believe the whole idea is that if you are already a projected top 10 pick coming out of high school, what is the point of spending your one year of college at a well known "privileged" college like Duke, UNC, etc. Those colleges don't need a higb profile player to play for them. Those schools are a brand by themselves. These top 10 projected one and done players should instead play their one year at HBCU or some lesser known college, that way they can help promote some of these smaller schools. They don't need the development that can be offered by the big time schools, and they don't need the publicity. They will bring the publiciy on their own to the HBCU college they sign with. They will also still be drafted in the top 10 after their one year regardless based on their potential.
No offense, but that is a pretty naive and idealistic perspective. It's foolish to believe that attending Duke, UK, UNC, etc doesn't provide a level of branding and marketability that Howard or North Carolina A&T cannot. This leads to increased recognition and popularity that greatly increases your star power when it comes to negotiating endorsement contracts. Even Zion Williamson benefitted from the Duke brand as much as Duke benefitted from Zion's talents. Williamson was well-known within the basketball community before attending Duke, but "Zion" is now a single-name worldwide sensation because of the television exposure and ESPN hype surrounding Duke due to his presence.

ESPN isn't travelling to broadcast every Howard game on TV, Makur Maker, or not. He will never receive the publicity or marketing that he would at a bigger school at Howard. It is a political move in the name of social justice, and that is his prerogative, but it isn't inconsequential for him or his future marketability.
 
Likes: PEPPERJAX
#64

bleedingTNorange

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
61,737
Likes
13,490
#64
^^^^

Not only this, but most Top 10 players still have needed areas of improvement and often times their bodies need improvement. Facilities and the nutrition support system at a place like Kentucky are going to be 100x better than that at a place like Howard.
 
Likes: PEPPERJAX
#65

GBOplayer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
67
Likes
154
#65
No offense, but that is a pretty naive and idealistic perspective. It's foolish to believe that attending Duke, UK, UNC, etc doesn't provide a level of branding and marketability that Howard or North Carolina A&T cannot. This leads to increased recognition and popularity that greatly increases your star power when it comes to negotiating endorsement contracts. Even Zion Williamson benefitted from the Duke brand as much as Duke benefitted from Zion's talents. Williamson was well-known within the basketball community before attending Duke, but "Zion" is now a single-name worldwide sensation because of the television exposure and ESPN hype surrounding Duke due to his presence.

ESPN isn't travelling to broadcast every Howard game on TV, Makur Maker, or not. He will never receive the publicity or marketing that he would at a bigger school at Howard. It is a political move in the name of social justice, and that is his prerogative, but it isn't inconsequential for him or his future marketability.
My point is that if the NBA did not have the age requirement, then Makur Maker would already be a top 10 pick. So he does not need to go to a high profile school for development and/or marketing. With social media, players can market themselves. In addition, any coaching he receives will be irrelevant because once he gets drafted they will jist recoach him to fit whatever goal that they have.
 
Likes: k-town_king
#66

cncchris33

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
22,525
Likes
16,309
#66
My point is that if the NBA did not have the age requirement, then Makur Maker would already be a top 10 pick. So he does not need to go to a high profile school for development and/or marketing. With social media, players can market themselves. In addition, any coaching he receives will be irrelevant because once he gets drafted they will jist recoach him to fit whatever goal that they have.
I couldn't disagree more, but I respect your opinion. I just think it is overly simplistic.
 
#67
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
321
Likes
233
#67
My point is that if the NBA did not have the age requirement, then Makur Maker would already be a top 10 pick. So he does not need to go to a high profile school for development and/or marketing. With social media, players can market themselves. In addition, any coaching he receives will be irrelevant because once he gets drafted they will jist recoach him to fit whatever goal that they have.
I don't think he will be a lottery pick.
 
Likes: cncchris33
#75

walkenvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2012
Messages
5,002
Likes
4,869
#75
Hard to envision these smaller schools getting television coverage outside of the NCAA tourney. Nobody saw David Robinson except in the tourney. If that’s what these young men desire then fine, just understand what you’re choosing
 

VN Store




Sponsors
 

Top