2019 Season countdown

#51

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#51


11
Jeff Baumtrog (2000)
Brad Blizzard (1983-1986)
Billy Paul Carver (1987)
Greg Chignoli (1991)
Wendell Clowers (1972-1973:away)
Tobin Davidson (1981)
Erik Filsinger (2001-02)
Blake Forsythe (2009-10)
Matt Garrett (1998-99)
Yan Gomes (2007)
Clay Greene (1996-1997)
Shawn Griffin (2008)
Larry Hardin (1972:home)
Will Heflin (2018-2019)
Randy Helton (1976)
Zach Luther (2012)
Gary Mashburn (1973:home)
Brian McCord (1988)
Randy McDaniel (1979-1980)
Jason Pantages (1992-1993)
Tom Pritchard (1965)
Danny Ramirez (1990)
Kyle Serrano (2014-2016)
Chris Siewert (2006)
Terry Smith (1966-1967)
John Warren (1982:away)
Bruce Walker (1978:home)
Richard Walkney (1969-1971:home)
John Yarbrough (1974:away) (1975)

#11 Yan Gomes
2007-08 | C/INF | R/R | 6-1 | 215 lbs. | Miami, Fla. (Southridge HS)

Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil Yan Gomes came to Rocky Top as a freshman in 2007 and made an immediate impact for the Diamond Vols. The catcher and infielder hit .310 with 70 hits, eight home runs and 47 RBIs, starting all 59 games he played in. He gunned down 11 base runners in 26 game behind the play and recorded 19 multi-hit games and a team-high 13 multi-RBI games.

With teammate and future pro J.P Arencibia absent from the lineup with a back injury, Gomes filled the void behind the plate from Feb. 23 through March 11. He had 11 doubles and home runs in his rookie season. Gomes finished the season with a .422 batting average against left-handers and a .265 average vs. right-handers. He hit .329 with runners in scoring position, had 24 two-out hits and reached base at a team-best .458 clip when leading off an inning (22 of 48). Gomes earned Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American and Freshman All-SEC honors in 2007.

The Miami native played in 52 games as a sophomore, making 50 starts. He started 40 games behind the plate, nine at first base and one as the Vols' designated hitter. He batted third or fourth in the order for 37-of-50 starts and threw out 12 potential base-stealers from behind the dish. Gomes earned a spot on the prestigious Johnny Bench Award watch list.

Gomes hit .316 as a sophomore with eight doubles, one triple, five homers and 35 RBIs. He added a .403 average vs. left-handed pitchers while batting .270 against right-handers and posting a team-best .347 average with runners on base (33-of-95). Gomes led the team with four sacrifice flies, totaled 18 multi-hit games and eight multi-RBI games.

Drated by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 10th round of the 2009 draft, Gomes went on to become the first Brazilian-born Major League Baseball player in the history of the game when he made his debut for the Jays on May 17, 2012 against the New York Yankees. He was 2-for-3 in that game. After one season in Toronto, Gomes was traded to the Cleveland Indians, and as the starting catcher helped lead the Tribe to the playoffs in 2013. Yon played in the 2016 WS against the Cubbies, and was traded to the Nationals in December 2018.

NOTES ON GOMES
- Name pronounced: YON GOMES (last name rhymes with: homes)
- Helped Brazil qualify for its first ever berth in the World Baseball Classic
- Majored in psychology at Tennessee
 
#52

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#52


10 DAYS LEFTY!
Bruce Basham (1977-1980)
Wendell Clowers (1972-1973:home)
Rich DeLucia (1983-1986)
Pete Derkay (2018-2019)
Mike Demster (1972:away)
Greg Geren (1981-1982)
David Greene (1965)
Allen Halliday (1987-1990)
Bill Hatfield (1973:away)
Rick Honeycutt (1974-1976)
Tyler Horne (2011)
Steve Light (1969:home)
Jim McBride (1967)
AJ Simcox (2014-2015)
Cody Stubbs (2010)
Bobby Tucker (1970-1971:home)
Steve Wieland (1969-1971:away)

#10 Rick Honeycutt
1973-76 | 1B/LHP | L/L | 6-1 | 185 lbs. | Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. (Lakeview HS)


Born in Chattanooga but growing up in north Georgia, Rick Honeycutt came to Tennessee as a freshman in 1973 and would leave as one of the program's greatest players of all-time. Honeycutt was not only a dominant pitcher, but he did more than hold his own with a bat in his hands as well. Over his career from 1973-76, Honeycutt compiled 21 wins, an impressive 2.97 ERA, 19 complete games and 185 strikeouts over 266.2 innings pitched. At the plate, Honeycutt hit .376 with 120 RBIs, 18 home runs, 155 total hits, 36 doubles and six triples.

Many of those marks land in the Vols' career record books. Honeycutt's 21 wins are tied for seventh and his 2.97 ERA stands alone at seventh in UT's career annals. His 19 complete games rank second, while his 35 games started and his 266.1 innings ranks eighth. Honeycutt's batting average (.376) stands fifth and his slugging percentage (.624) ranks 10th all-time.

The lefty played a role in two no-hitters as a senior in 1976. Honeycutt and teammate Jim Gaylor combined to throw a seven inning no-hitter against Slippery Rock on March 16, 1976, with the Vols winning 8-0. Honeycutt pitched the opening four scoreless innings and Gaylor came in for a three-inning save. Just three days later, Honeycutt blanked Georgia over seven innings for an individual no-hitter, one of just five in UT history. Only a leadoff walk to start the sixth inning kept him from a perfect game. He retired the first 15 batters he faced and struck out the side to close the game. At the plate, Honeycutt went 2-for-2 with a walk, scoring the game's lone run on a sacrifice fly in the second inning.

He earned First Team ABCA All-American honors in 1976 and was a two-time All-SEC performer over his four seasons.

Honeycutt was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 17th round of the 1976 MLB draft and made his MLB debut on August 24, 1977. That would be the start of an incredible 21-year major league career with six different teams. He was a two-time All-Star and pitched in three straight World Series (1988, 89 & 90), winning the title with the Oakland Athletics in 1989. During the 1996 and 1997 seasons, Honeycutt was the oldest active player in the National League. He retired at the age of 43 following the 1997 season.

The current pitching coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Honeycutt got his coaching career started right here at Tennessee. He was a graduate assistant on the 1977 staff and was a full-time assistant coach in 1990. He was been with the Dodgers for eight seasons.

Honeycutt was inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996 and the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 2006. He was also named to the Tennessee Baseball All-Century Team in 2009.

NOTES ON HONEYCUTT
- Vols' MVP award is named after him
- Earned two Baseball Hall of Fame votes in 2003
- Led the American league with a 2.84 ERA in 1983
 
#55

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#55


9
Justin Ammons (2017-2019)
Larry Anderson (1992)
Brian Baker (1999)
Jay Bass (1976:home)
Mike Basse (1989-1991)
Kris Bennett (2000-01)
Hal Bibee (1975)
Don Campbell (1969:away)
Ted Carson (1982)
Wendell Clowers (1969-1970:home)
Jimmy Elliott (1971-1974)
Aaron Everett (2008)
Robert Gaddy (1988)
Mike Graham (1980)
Matt Hamaker (2009-10)
Tim Harvey (1979:away)
Chris Heath (2002-03)
Eli Iorg (2004-05)
Ryan Jones (2006-07)
Ed Lewis (1993-1996)
Steve Long (1970:away)
Mike McConkey (1978:home)
Jeff Meizlik (1967)
Greg Newsom (1983-1986)
Chris Pierce (2011)
Zack Reid (2016)
Gary Rivers (1976:away)
Justin Ross (1997-1998)
Dan Rudder (1981)
Joel Smith (1987)

#9 Eli Iorg
2004-05 | OF | R/R | 6-3 | 200 lbs. | Knoxville, Tenn. (Karns HS)

Eli Iorg burst onto the Tennessee baseball scene as a sophomore in 2004, transferring in from Samford University. Iorg finished as UT's second-leading hitter with a .324 average while leading the team in hits (77), triples (6) and stolen bases (26) that season. He tied for second with 47 runs scored and was fourth on the squad with 36 RBIs. His six triples tied for fourth on UT's single-season list and he ranked second in the SEC in steals and triples. Iorg hit .462 in the SEC Tournament, earning SEC All-Tournament Team honors. Iorg was also awarded Team MVP honors as a sophomore.

Iorg enjoyed a monster year in 2005, earning second-team All-America status and leading the Vols to the College World Series. He led the SEC with 27 stolen bases while ranking second in the league with 72 hits and posting a .381 average at the plate. His average ranked third in the conference. He also added a team-high 15 longballs. Iorg's 2005 season stands out in the record books. His 168 total bases ranks fourth, his 96 hits are tie for fifth and his 72 RBIs ranks sixth. Iorg also brought home the Rick Honeycutt Team MVP Award in 2005.

On the career charts, the right fielder is tied for fifth all-time in UT's record book with 10 triples and ranks tied for eighth with 53 stolen bases.

After being drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 14th round a season before, Iorg became Tennessee's 15th first round MLB Draft choice in 2005. He was selected by the Houston Astros with the 38th overall pick and went on to play five seasons in their minor league system. He hit .273 with 352 hits, including 75 doubles and 16 home runs, over the course of 357 games. Iorg played for the Greeneville Astros (Rk), Lexington Legends (A), Salem Avalance (A+), Corpus Christi Hooks (AA), Round Rock Express (AAA) and the Tri-City ValleyCats (A-). Currently is a real estate agent in Birmingham.

From home plate to home sales, Eli Iorg makes journey from pro baseball to Alabama Realtor - Alabama NewsCenter

NOTES ON IORG
- Full name is Eli James Iorg (Last name pronounced: OAR-j)
- Majored in political science at UT
- Graduated from Karns High School in Knoxville, Tenn
 
#56

@1RBFjr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2018
Messages
90
Likes
104
#56
First Baseball MVP Luncheon Set for February 11 - University of Tennessee Athletics

First baseball lunch of the year on Monday. They are charging this year (IIRC, they charged a number of years ago then eventually dropped it), buy tickets online for $5 plus $1 fee. I鈥檓 looking forward to attending. According to the article, at the lunch you鈥檒l get either a ticket to an Appy State game or a voucher to use at concessions.
 
Last edited:
#57

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#57


8
Eric Bodman (1988-1989)
Jim Broughton (1983)
Tommy Cox (1973:home)
Brandon Chia (2017-2018)
Hunter Daniel (2012)
Phil Garner (1970:away)
Jeff Geer (1986-1987)
Rick Gordon (1969-1971:home)
Ronnie Hartsfield (1978-1981)
Mark Lipsuis (1984-1985)
David Mitchell (1976-1977)
Khayyan Norfork (2010-11)
Norman Pratt (1969:away)
Leno Ramirez (2016)
Christian Scott (2019)
Paul Slover (1967)
Cubb Stokes (1971:away)
Bruce Trusley (1972:home)
Randy Wallace (1974-1975)
Bob Whittlesey (1972-1973:away)
Danny Wiltz (2008-09)
Mike Wise (1982)

#8 Ronnie Hartsfield
1978-81 | OF | 5-9 | 185 lbs. | Lawrenceburg, Tenn. (Lawrence County)

A graduate of Lawrence County High School, Ronnie Hartsfield joined the Vols on the diamond for his freshman season in 1978. The 5-foot-9, 185-pound outfielder could cover all sorts of ground in center field, where he started for three seasons. Hartsfield made the move to shortstop his senior year at UT.

While on Rocky Top, Hartsfield recorded a .351 career batting average and had an impressive 55 stolen bases. When he left the program following the 1981 season he led the Tennessee record books in career hits (237), stolen bases (55), runs scored (57) and singles (180). Those records have all since been broken.

Hartsfield hit .355 in his first season, a mark that ranks fourth all-time by a freshmen. In his senior campaign Hartsfield worked his average up to a team-best .362. He earned SEC All-Eastern Division honors in 1978 and 1981.

Hartsfield also totaled eight home runs, 93 RBIs, 41 doubles and eight triples over his career.

He was named one of 26 members of the Tennessee Baseball All-Century Team in 2009, and given a Certificate of Achievement and named a hometown hero by the Mayor of Lawrenceburg.

NOTES ON HARTSFIELD
- 1978 & 1981 All-SEC Eastern Division honoree
- Led the team with 63 hits in 1979
- Stole 21 bases in 1979
 
#58

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#58


7
Steve Caputo (1986-1987)
Nick Crowe (2002-04)
Chris Fritts (2010-12)
Phil Garner (1969:away)
Cal Gobbell (2018)
Bill Hatfield (1973:home) (1974-1976)
Larry Hardin (1972:away)
Mike Hornsby (2009)
Matt Huskey (1998)
Doug Lowery (1979-1980)
Stan Loy (1978)
Gary Mashburn (1973:away)
Devon Nicholson (1999-01)
Allan Parker (1993-1994)
Justin Rodgers(2014-2016)
Clark Rose (1988-1990)
Justin Ross (1996)
Jake Rucker (2019)
Andy Simunic (2007-08)
Mac Stalcup (1967)
Larry Tinsley (1981)
Pete Torgereson (1984)
Richard Walkney (1970:away)
John Warren (1982:home)
Bruce Wilson (1971:home)
Jimmy Young (1969-1970:home)

#7 Andy Simunic
2007-08 | OF/INF | 6-0 | 170 lbs. | Collierville, Tenn. (Collierville HS)


A 2004 graduate of Collierville High School, Andy Simunic joined the Volunteers after playing two seasons at Chattanooga State Technical Community College. He proved to be the most versatile player on the roster and one of UT's top offensive threats in his first season. He led the team in hitting for much of the season - finishing with a .333 average - and started at five different positions. Simunic posted a team-best 75 hits, 12 doubles 27 RBIs and 29 stolen bases to lead the Southeastern Conference. He hit .325 in SEC play with 37 hits, seven RBIs and nine steals. In the SEC Tournament, Simunic has two hits and scored twice as UT defeated No. 1 Vanderbilt.

Simunic earned the team's Steve Searcy Most Improved Player Award and the Phil Garner Defensive Player Award in 2007.

Simunic transitioned to second base out of necessity in 2008, starting all 48 games he appeared at the position. He once again led the Vols on the bases, stealing 20 bags to up his two-year total to an impressive 49. He also helped the Vols turn 32 of UT's 53 double plays on the season. Simunic finished with a .297 batting average with eight RBIs and nine doubles.

The Tennesean was drafted by the Houston Astros in the 17th round of the 2008 MLB Draft and is entering his seventh season of professional baseball in 2014. Simunic worked his way up the Houston organization and over the past three seasons has played in 55 games for the Triple-A Oklahoma City RedHawks. In 2013, the outfielder hit .278 for OKC, driving in 15 runs on 40 hits and stealing nine bases. Andy finished his playing career with the 2014 AAA Gwinnett Braves.

NOTES ON SIMUNIC
- Majored in sociology/criminal justice at UT
- Graduated from Collierville High School in Collierville, Tenn.
- Born Aug. 7, 1985, in Bloomington, Ind.

#7 Jordan Rodgers
2014 | INF | 6-1 | 185 lbs. | R/R | Memphis, Tenn. (Memphis University School)


A two-sport stud at Memphis University School - starting shortstop and quarterback - Jordan Rodgers knows how to lead and how to win. He led the Owls' baseball team to regional championships in 2001 and 20012, finishing as the state runner-up both seasons. He also helped guide the football team to a 2010 state championships and finished as the Tennessee Division-II-AA state runner-ups in 2012. He was named a Mr. Football finalist in the state of Tennessee and tabbed the regional player of the year in 2012 for his performance on the gridiron. He threw for an impressive 2,851 yards, 35 touchdowns and just five interceptions while leading the Owls to a 10-3 record as a senior.

On the diamond, Rodgers was ranked by Perfect Game as the No. 4 shortstop and the 34th-best overall prospect in the state of Tennessee. He earned PG Southeast Region Honorable Mention honors in 2013 and was an Underclass Honorable Mention All-American in 2012. He batted .345 with eight homer and went 6-2 on the mount as a senior and hit .344 with five home runs and an 8-2 pitching mark as a junior. Rodgers was named all-metro and second team all-state as a senior, as well as a Commercial Appeal Best of the Preps finalist.

Jordan is with the Atlanta Braves organization

NOTES ON RODGERS
- Full name is Jordan Taylor Rodgers
- Desires to one day be a manager in Major League Baseball
 
#59

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#59


6
Mark Batchko (1975)
Kevin Carter (1986-1987)
Tommy Cook (1978)
Charles Fulton (1967)
Wayne Gratigny (1984-1985)
David Hayden (1991)
Tracy Hamilton (1982-1983)
Brandon Hopkins (1999-02)
Steve Light (1969:away)
Reggie Luther (1981)
Danny Maples (1974)
Steve Matthews (1989)
Jeff Moberg (2014-2017)
Isaiah Newson (2005-06)
Zach Osborne (2009-10)
Jeff Pickler (1996-1998)
Norman Pratt (1969:home)
Blair Quin (1976-1977)
Garry Robinson (1973)
Jake Rowland (2012)
Evan Russell (2018-2019)
Dave Rutherford (1972:home)
Steve Soper (1994)
Zane Stone (2007-08)
Brent Trusley (1972:away)
David Vance (1992-1993)
Steve Wesley (2003)
Ron Widby (1966)
Steve Wieland (1970-1971:home)
Bruce Wilson (1972:home)

#6 Jeff Pickler
1996-98 | INF | 5-10 | 185 lbs. | Santa Ana, Calif. (Foothill HS/Cypress College)

After playing for his father Scott Pickler at Cypress Community College in California as a freshman, Jeff Pickler transferred to Tennessee the season after UT made its second College World Series run. Over three seasons with the Volunteers, Picker re-wrote the record books and still stands in the top 10s in many categories. Currently, Pickler ranks third all-time at UT with 259 career hits - behind only Chris Burke (314) and Todd Helton (280). He also stands sixth in career batting average (.375) and runs scored (157) and fifth in career doubles (55).

But it was specifically the 1998 season - Pickler's senior campaign - that puts him up in the all-time great category. Pickler was named the 1998 Southeastern Conference Player of the Year after leading the league with a .445 average, which ranked eighth nationally and was the sixth-highest in league history. He astounded the baseball pundits by posting a .500 batting average in conference action.

The consensus All-American garnered first-team honors from Collegiate Baseball, Baseball America, Baseball Weekly, The Sporting News, the American Baseball Coaches Association and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. Pickler was also named first-team Academic All-America as well as being a three-time Academic All-SEC honoree, even earning the Chancellor's Citation for Academic Excellence from the University.

The second baseman led the SEC in fielding at his position in 1998 while setting a then-school record with 109 hits while reaching base safely in 53 of the Vols' 55 games. He reeled off the second-longest hitting streak in school history (26 games) while tying the school record with a six-hit game.

Pickler was drafted in the 11th round by the Milwaukee Brewers in 1998 and went on to play eight seasons in the minor leagues. He hit .299 in the minors with 1,023 hits, including 165 doubles.

In 2009, Pickler took a job with the University of Arizona as an assistant coach, and was a scout for the San Diego Padres in 2010. Since 2011, Pickler has been the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim's minor league defensive coordinator.

NOTES ON PICKLER
- Full name is Jeff Blaine Pickler
- Sister, Kari, was an actress on Broadway
- Majored in marketing at Tennessee
 
#60

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#60


5
Jamie Bennett (1999-00)
Greg Bentley (1987)
Julio Borb贸n (2005-07)
Scott Campbell (1990-91)
Zack Daniels (2018-19)
Jimmy Gaylor (1976-1979)
Patrick Green (2003)
Tim Groner (1988)
Chris Hall (2015-17)
Tyler Horne (2009)
Barry Hyatt (1984&1986)
Jason Imperial (1989)
Kurt Keene (1997-1998)
Adam King (2010)
Steve Long (1969:away)
Jerry Morris (1980-1981)
Bill Oden (1973:home)
Augie Ojeda (1996)
Malcolm Petty (1966)
Chris Pierce (2012)
Brian Powell (2008)
Norman Pratt (1967)
Scott Price (2014
Joe Pritchard (1973:away)
Dave Rutherford (1970-1971:home)
Alex Sanmiguel (1992-1993)
Scott Simpson (1982-1983)
Mike Smithson (1975:home)
Brian St. Jean (2002)
Brad Tunnell (1985)
Matt Whitley (1994-1995)

#5 Julio Borb贸n
2005-07 | OF | 6-1 | 190 lbs. | Santo Domingo, D.R. (Colegio Dominicano De La Salle)

A native of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Borb贸n came to Tennessee as a freshman in 2005 and made an immediate impact. He helped lead the Vols back to the College World Series with the third-highest batting average (.350) on the team. His freshman average ranks fifth on UT's freshman records. He totaled 77 hits, three home runs and 42 RBIs. Borb贸n was believed to lead the NCAA with 19 bunt hits as a rookie (not an official stat), and earned NCAA Knoxville All-Tournament Team honors in the postseason. Borb贸n was named a Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American.

Borb贸n showed no signs of a sophomore slump in 2006, leading the Vols in batting average (.366), runs (45), hits (86), triples (5) and stolen bases (19). He was named to the ABCA All-South Region second team and was a second team All-SEC selection. Off the field, Borbon was named to the 2006 ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District IV team and was UT's nominee for the SEC Baseball Scholar-Athlete of the Year award. He started all 55 games in centerfield and batted in the leadoff spot in 54 contests. Borbon posted 66 singles in 2006, which is currently tied for 10th on the all-time single-season record list. He added five triples, which also ranks in a tie for 10th on the single-season charts.

Borb贸n closed out his career with another solid campaign. He hit .345 with 60 hits, a career-best six triples, three home runs and 28 RBIs as a junior in 2007. A .355 career hitter, Borb贸n ranks third in UT history in triples (13), sixth in singles (173) and 10th in hits (223). His six triples in 2007 rank fourth in UT's single-season records.

He was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the first round (35th overall) of the 2007 MLB Draft. Borb贸n played four seasons for the Rangers - playing in the 2010 World Series - before being claimed by the Chicago Cubs. Borb贸n played last season with the Cubs and is now a part of the Baltimore Orioles organization after being selected in the Rule 5 Draft.

NOTES ON BORBON
- Full name is Julio Alberto Borb贸n
- Born Feb. 20, 1986, in Starkville, Miss.
- Majored in sport management at Tennessee

Julio Borb贸n - Wikipedia
 
Last edited:
#61

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#61
4.jpeg

4
Ted Arpin (1976-1977)
Jack Branston (2003-04)
Jay Charleston (2017-2019)
Marc DelPiano (1987-1988)
Todd Fox (1999)
David Greene (1966-1967)
Doug Hecker (1990)
Brent Hestand (1981)
Ronny Long (1983-1984)
Shawn McDonnell (1989)
Mike Mondelli (1969)
Baker Moore (1996-1997)
Michael Moore (2006-09)
Jared Pruett (2016)
Jonathan Rapavi (2005)
Hunter Rigsby (2000-02)
Coleman Smith (1991)
Zeth Stone (2010)
Adam Swallows (1993-1994)
Rodney Woods (1974-1975)
Parker Wormsley (2012-2015)
Barry Wright (1978-1980)

#4 Doug Hecker
1990-92 | 1B | 6-4 | 205 lbs. | Wantagh, N.Y. (MacArthur)
Former Vol Phil Hecker came to the University of Tennessee from Wantagh, N.Y., a town on Long Island. As a freshman in 1990, Hecker wore the No. 4 before sporting No. 20 for the reaminder of his career.
For his career, Hecker hit .323, amassing 37 home runs, 158 RBIs, 199 hits, 39 doubles and 17 stolen bases. His 37 home runs currently stand second all-time in the Vols record books, just behind Todd Helton's 38 dingers. In addition, his RBIs rank fifth all-time. He also hit three grand slams over his career, tying for the current UT record.
Hecker was also a pitcher for the Vols, leading the team in ERA in 1991 (2.67) and 1992 (1.36). Hecker earned third-team All-America status from the ABCA in 1991 and garnered first-team honors from Baseball America and The Sporting News in 1992. He hit .362 and .351 in 1991 and 1992, respectively. He also logged six saves on the mound during those two seasons and owned a career ERA鈥坥f 1.99. Heck was also a two-time All-SEC performer.
Hecker was invited to try out for Team USA in 1992 as a first baseman, becoming the first Vol to ever try out for the Red, White and Blue. He was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the third round of the 1992 MLB Draft and was in the minor league for six seasons. He was named to Tennessee's All-Century Team in 2009.
NOTES ON HECKER
- Attended MacArthur High School on Long Island
- Won the team's Rick Honeycutt MVP Award in 1991
- Won the Phil Garner Defensive Player Award in 1992

Jay Charleston
CAREER HONORS
2018 Spring SEC Academic Honor Roll

2018 - SOPHOMORE
Played in 56 games (55 starts) during the 2018 season for the Vols, hitting .285 with 26 RBIs, four home runs and six doubles. He led Tennessee with 65 hits, 42 runs scored and 21 stolen bases (26 attempts).
Tied for first in the SEC with 21 stolen bases and 10th in the league in at-bats with 228
Finished the season on a 5-game hit streak dating back to Game 2 of the Vanderbilt series (5/12) where he recorded two hits and scored a run.
Posted his best game of the year in the series finale at Georgia, going 4-for-5 with two runs, an RBI and three stolen bases (4/29). The four hits and three steals were both career highs
Batted .500 (6-for-12) in the Texas A&M series, hitting one double, scoring two runs and driving in three runs to help Tennessee take the series (4/20-22)
Tallied four hits and five RBI during the Florida series while also scoring one run (4/7-8)
Notched two doubles, two stolen bases and two scored runs vs. Belmont on April 3, helping Tennessee to a 9-2 win
Scored three runs and drove in two more in a 3-for-5 outing at Western Carolina that included a his third homer of the year (3/27)
Hit his first double of the season vs. ETSU in a 4-for-5, two RBI effort (3/20)
Recorded two hits and scored a run in the SEC opener at Ole Miss, helping the Vols to an 8-6 win over the Rebels (3/16)
Went 3-for-5 and drove in a run against ETSU in the first game of the Tri-Star Classic on March 2
Recorded at least two hits in three straight games (2/24-27) and notched three RBI and a score run on Feb. 27 vs. Middle Tennessee
Hit his first-career home run to lead off the bottom of the first inning in Game 2 vs. Maryland (2/18). He went deep again with a solo shot in the third and finished the day with three hits and four runs scored over the Sunday doubleheader

2017 - FRESHMAN
Played in 25 games (12 starts) during his debut campaign for the Vols, hitting .250 with three RBIs and going 5-for-6 in stolen base attempts.
Served as a pinch runner/designated hitter in each of Tennessee's games visiting No. 20-ranked Texas A&M in College Station (April 21-23).
Hit 1-for-3 with a walk and one run scored in the Vols' midweek matchup vs. MTSU (April 4), making his first career start at the leadoff spot in the lineup for UT.
Appeared in the second game at Mississippi State, going 1-for-2 with one run scored (March 25).
Went 2-for-4 in UT's SEC Opener vs. South Carolina (March 17).
Started two of three games in left field for the Vols' series vs. Cincinnati (March 10-12), going 3-for-7 (.429) with one RBI and one stolen base.
Went 3-for-6 in UT's series finale vs. Norfolk State, his first career multi-hit game for the Volunteers.
Recorded his first collegiate hit on Feb. 24 at San Diego, as part of a Tennessee doubleheader in the 2017 Tony Gwynn Classic.
Made collegiate debut on Feb. 18, starting left field for the Volunteers against the Memphis Tigers.
Charleston stole his league-leading 31st base of the summer on July 19 vs. Lumberjack. In the outing, he also went 2-for-3, hit a double, recorded an RBI and scored twice. In addition to competing for the South All-Stars in the 2017 Valley Baseball League All-Star Game, he also participated in the 2017 Prospect Showcase, inaugural Southern Collegiate Showcase and the 2017 SE Prospect Showcase. In the non-league games, Charleston recorded two hits, scored five times and stole three bases.
 
#62

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#62
Todday's Update



3
TODD HELTON (1993-1995) - RETIRED
Joey Andrews (2002-05)
Charles Black (1976:away)
Andy Blanco (1991-1992)
Jeff Christensen (1998-01)
Justin Duckwiler (1997)
Mike Duvall (1967)
Aaron Everett (2006-07)
Pepi Felieu (1985)
James Fritz (1996)
Don Goldstein (1980)
Jason Imperial (1990)
Pat Lenahan (1970:home) (1971-1973)
Mike Lawler (1966)
David Mitchell (1974)
Gary Rivera (1977&1979) (1978:away)
Dave Rutherford (1969:away)
Jim Sanger (1986-1987)
Brian Szilagyi (1989)
Terry Troutman (1983-1984)

3 Todd Helton
1993-95 | 1B/LHP | 6-2 | 205 lbs. | Knoxville, Tenn. (Central)

Todd Helton, the 1995 National Collegiate Player of the Year, was the eighth player chosen in the 1995 free-agent amateur draft by the Colorado Rockies.

Helton received the Dick Howser Award from USA鈥圱oday/Baseball Weekly, Baseball America's National Player of the Year Award, Collegiate Baseball's Co-National Player of the Year and the Southeastern Conference's Male Athlete of the Year Award. He became only the second baseball player to receive the SEC award. The two-time first-team All-American was also a finalist for the coveted Golden Spikes Award in 1995.

That season, he batted .407 while leading the league in home runs (20), RBIs (92), runs (86), doubles (27), hits (105), walks (61), slugging percentage (.775) and on-base percentage (.522). He also led the conference with a 1.66 ERA while compiling an 8-2 record with 12 saves.

Helton was a consensus Freshman All-American in 1993, first-team All-SEC and third-team All-American. The honors continued to roll in 1994 as he earned first-team All-America honors by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association, second team by Baseball America and third team by Collegiate Baseball. He was second-team All-SEC that year as well.

He helped guide the Vols to three straight NCAA Regional appearances, including a third-place finish at the 1995 College World Series. He was twice named to the NCAA All-Tournament Team and earned a complete game pitching victory over Clemson in the first round of the College World Series. Helton holds numerous school hitting records while also holding the SEC's mark for consecutive scoreless innings pitched with 47.2 in 1994.

He also played with Team USA in 1993. As one of two true freshmen on the squad, he hit .352 in 33 games while leading the team to a 30-16 record and the silver medal at the Intercontinental Cup.

In addition to a fine baseball career, he played football during the 1992, 1993 and 1994 seasons for the Vols. He appeared in 13 games, making three career starts. All three starts came in the 1994 season against Georgia (W), Florida (L) and Mississippi State (L). He had his top passing game versus UCLA in 1994 when he came off the bench to complete 14-of-28 passes for 165 yards and one touchdown. For his career, he completed 41-of-75 passes (54.7 percent) for 484 yards with four touchdowns and three interceptions. He also rushed 36 times for 87 yards.

Helton played for the Rockies for an incredible 17 years and retired following the 2013 season. A five-time All-Star and four-time Silver Slugger Award winner, Helton closed his career with a .316 batting average, 2,519 hits, 592 doubles and 369 home runs. He holds Rockies' records for games played (2,247), runs scored (1,401), hits, doubles, home runs, RBI (1,406) and walks (1,335).

NOTES ON HELTON
- Graduated from Central High School in Knoxville
- First Tennessee athlete to be named Gatorade Circle of Champions Player of the Year for the state in both football and baseball in the same year
- Was the starting quarterback ahead of freshman Peyton Manning in 1994
 
#63

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#63


2
Les Binkley (1997-1998)
Chris Burke (1999-01)
Phil Dannunzio (1991-1992)
Tony Delmonico (2006-07)
Dean Eichelberger (1982-1983)
Larry Fielder (1966-1968)
Brian Harwood (1989)
Gerald Hays (1981)
Robbie Howard (1975:home) (1976-1977)
Eric King (2004-05)
Ray Labelle (1984-1986)
Brett Langhorne (2015-2016)
Roger McKinney (1971-1972)
James Northeimer (1993-1994)
Zach Osborne (2011-12)
Joe Pritchard (1973:home) (1974-1975)
Tom Pritchard (1966)
Scott Schroeffel (1995-1996)
Walter Sevilla (2002-03)
Taylor Smart (2014)
Alex Sosnowski (2017-2018)

#2 Chris Burke
1999-2001 | SS/2B | 5-11 | 185 lbs. | Louisville, Ky. (St. Xavier)


A three-year letter winner for the Big Orange from 1999-2001, Burke was a two-time All-SEC selection and two-time All-American while rewriting both Tennessee's single-season and career record books. He established six season marks and eight career standards and was the first Vol to ever hit for the cycle, doing so against Vanderbilt on May 11, 2001.

In 2001, Burke put together one of the best seasons ever by a UT player, becoming just the third Vol to be named the Southeastern Conference Player of the Year as he was bestowed the honor unanimously by the league coaches after hitting .435 with 20 home runs and 60 RBI while leading the Vols to the College World Series.

The consensus All-American garnered first-team honors from Baseball America, Baseball Weekly, Louisville Slugger/Collegiate Baseball, the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association and the American Baseball Coaches Association/Rawlings. Burke was also a finalist for National Player of the Year honors as well as being named the NCBWA District III Player of the Year and selected for the ABCA/Rawlings All-South Region Team.

In leading the Vols to their third trip to Omaha, Burke was named to the all-tournament teams at the College World Series, NCAA Regional and the SEC Tournament. He was the only player in the SEC to hit better than .400 in 2001 and led the conference in eight different categories while ranking in the top 10 in four others.

Burke, who played both shortstop and second base at UT, left Knoxville as the No. 10 overall pick in the first round of the 2001 MLB Draft by the Houston Astros. He played six seasons in the Major Leagues before retiring in 2010. The highlight of his professional career came in the fourth game of the 2005 National League Division Series as he hit a series-winning, walk-off home run in the 18th inning against the Atlanta Braves.

NOTES ON BURKE
- Full name is Christopher Alan Burke
- Born March 11, 1980 in Louisville, Ky.
- Majored in arts & sciences at Tennessee

My own CB story - we went to Orlando for spring break in 2005 and watched the Astros vs. Braves spring training game. CB was my 11 year old son's (at the time) favorite player. I had a UT hat on and my son was wearing a UT shirt and we yelled hello at CB, he waved back and threw my son a ball. I told CB "we are headed back to Omaha this year!!". He laughed and gave a thumbs up and went back to his pre-game drills. Pretty good day for us.
 
#65

StarRaider

Blood Type Orange+
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,566
Likes
1,900
#65


1
Brian Bibee (2006-07)
Jimmy Boring (1980)
Zan Brooks (1976)
Amos Burdine (1998-1999)
Greg Chignoli (1990)
Chris Cioffi (1987)
Michael Cosgrove (1997)
Brandon Crowe (2000-04)
R.A. Dickey (1994-1996)
Hector Garcia (1989)
Bobby Gaylor (1984-1986)
Tom Giles (1966-1967)
Ricky Hawkins (1991-1993)
Steve Hembree (1969) (1970-1971:home)
Condredge Holloway (1972-1975)
Curtis Johnson (1982-1983)
Brodie Leftridge (2015-2018
Will Maddox (2012)
Roger McKinney (1970:away)
P.J. Polk (2008-10)
Al Soularie (2019
Jimmy Streater (1978-1979)
Andrew Toles (2011)
Bruce Walker (1977:home)
Will Maddox (2012-2014)

#1 Condredge Holloway
1972-75 | SS | 5-11 | 175 lbs. | Huntsville, Ala. (Lee)

A current Assistant AD for Student-Athlete Relations/Lettermen at the University of Tennessee, Condredge Holloway played both football and baseball at UT from 1972-75. The outstanding prospect out of Huntsville, Ala., had been selected out of high school by the Montreal Expos with their first overall pick. Holloway opted instead for a two-sport collegiate career and went on to excel on the diamond. Not only was Holloway the first black quarterback at Tennessee and in the Southeastern Conference, but he was also the first black baseball player in UT history.

Holloway - still the owner of UT's longest hitting streak at 27 games - garnered All-SEC and All-America honors as a shortstop for the Vols in 1975 and finished with a .353 career batting average. He led the SEC in batting average in 1975 with a .396 clip.

Inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000 and named to the team's All-Century Team, Holloway is the only UT student-athlete to be named to both the football and baseball all-century squads.

Nicknamed "The Artful Dodger" on the gridiron, Holloway left Knoxville and played 13 seasons in the Canadian Football League, compiling impressive numbers for the Ottawa Rough Riders (1975-80), Toronto Argonauts (1981-86) and British Columbia Lions (1987). He threw for more than 25,000 yards and rushed for another 3,167 while scoring 155 touchdowns. He was league MVP in 1982.

NOTES ON HOLLOWAY
- Inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 1993
- Holloway's career was the subject of an ESPN documentary, "The Color Orange: The Condredge Holloway Story"
- Finished his baseball career with 145 hits

#1 R.A. Dickey
1994-96 | RHP | 6-3 | 195 lbs. | Nashville, Tenn. (Montgomery Bell Academy)

R.A. Dickey became the second Vol of the Rod Delmonico era to be taken in the first round of the free-agent draft, when he was selected by the Texas Rangers with the 18th pick in the 1996 draft. Dickey also wrote his name in the Vols' record books as the career leader in wins (38), appearances (73), games started (54), innings pitched (434.0) and strikeouts (345). As a result, he ranks fourth in the SEC in career innings pitched and tied for fifth in career wins.

Dickey also holds the school standard for wins and innings pitched, while ranking third for strikeouts in a single season (137 in 1996).

He was a three-time first-team All-America and a 1996 Olympian, in addition to being a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and an Academic All-American following his junior year. He was the Mizuno/Collegiate Baseball and Baseball America 1994 National Freshman of the Year. He was named first-team All-America in 1995 on the Super Smith team, third-team All-America by Collegiate Baseball and Baseball America. In 1996, he was a Smith Award semifinalist, a first-team All-American by Collegiate Baseball, second-team All-American by ABCA and third-team All-American by Baseball America.

Dickey was also named to the 1994 Mideast Regional All-Tournament Team and 1995 Mideast Regional MVP.

Entering his 12th MLB season, Dickey's strongest campaign came in 2012 with the New York Mets. Dickey became the first knuckleballer to ever win the Cy Young Award in 2012. He finished the season with 20-6 record and 2.73 ERA, while leading the league in strikeouts (230), innings pitched (233.2), complete games (five), shutouts (three) and quality starts (27).

NOTES ON DICKEY
- Only three-time First Team All-American in Tennessee baseball history
- Inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012

Turning it over to vol66!!
 
#67
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
35
Likes
16
#67


1
Brian Bibee (2006-07)
Jimmy Boring (1980)
Zan Brooks (1976)
Amos Burdine (1998-1999)
Greg Chignoli (1990)
Chris Cioffi (1987)
Michael Cosgrove (1997)
Brandon Crowe (2000-04)
R.A. Dickey (1994-1996)
Hector Garcia (1989)
Bobby Gaylor (1984-1986)
Tom Giles (1966-1967)
Ricky Hawkins (1991-1993)
Steve Hembree (1969) (1970-1971:home)
Condredge Holloway (1972-1975)
Curtis Johnson (1982-1983)
Brodie Leftridge (2015-2018
Will Maddox (2012)
Roger McKinney (1970:away)
P.J. Polk (2008-10)
Al Soularie (2019
Jimmy Streater (1978-1979)
Andrew Toles (2011)
Bruce Walker (1977:home)
Will Maddox (2012-2014)

#1 Condredge Holloway
1972-75 | SS | 5-11 | 175 lbs. | Huntsville, Ala. (Lee)


A current Assistant AD for Student-Athlete Relations/Lettermen at the University of Tennessee, Condredge Holloway played both football and baseball at UT from 1972-75. The outstanding prospect out of Huntsville, Ala., had been selected out of high school by the Montreal Expos with their first overall pick. Holloway opted instead for a two-sport collegiate career and went on to excel on the diamond. Not only was Holloway the first black quarterback at Tennessee and in the Southeastern Conference, but he was also the first black baseball player in UT history.

Holloway - still the owner of UT's longest hitting streak at 27 games - garnered All-SEC and All-America honors as a shortstop for the Vols in 1975 and finished with a .353 career batting average. He led the SEC in batting average in 1975 with a .396 clip.

Inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000 and named to the team's All-Century Team, Holloway is the only UT student-athlete to be named to both the football and baseball all-century squads.

Nicknamed "The Artful Dodger" on the gridiron, Holloway left Knoxville and played 13 seasons in the Canadian Football League, compiling impressive numbers for the Ottawa Rough Riders (1975-80), Toronto Argonauts (1981-86) and British Columbia Lions (1987). He threw for more than 25,000 yards and rushed for another 3,167 while scoring 155 touchdowns. He was league MVP in 1982.

NOTES ON HOLLOWAY
- Inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 1993
- Holloway's career was the subject of an ESPN documentary, "The Color Orange: The Condredge Holloway Story"
- Finished his baseball career with 145 hits

#1 R.A. Dickey
1994-96 | RHP | 6-3 | 195 lbs. | Nashville, Tenn. (Montgomery Bell Academy)


R.A. Dickey became the second Vol of the Rod Delmonico era to be taken in the first round of the free-agent draft, when he was selected by the Texas Rangers with the 18th pick in the 1996 draft. Dickey also wrote his name in the Vols' record books as the career leader in wins (38), appearances (73), games started (54), innings pitched (434.0) and strikeouts (345). As a result, he ranks fourth in the SEC in career innings pitched and tied for fifth in career wins.

Dickey also holds the school standard for wins and innings pitched, while ranking third for strikeouts in a single season (137 in 1996).

He was a three-time first-team All-America and a 1996 Olympian, in addition to being a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and an Academic All-American following his junior year. He was the Mizuno/Collegiate Baseball and Baseball America 1994 National Freshman of the Year. He was named first-team All-America in 1995 on the Super Smith team, third-team All-America by Collegiate Baseball and Baseball America. In 1996, he was a Smith Award semifinalist, a first-team All-American by Collegiate Baseball, second-team All-American by ABCA and third-team All-American by Baseball America.

Dickey was also named to the 1994 Mideast Regional All-Tournament Team and 1995 Mideast Regional MVP.

Entering his 12th MLB season, Dickey's strongest campaign came in 2012 with the New York Mets. Dickey became the first knuckleballer to ever win the Cy Young Award in 2012. He finished the season with 20-6 record and 2.73 ERA, while leading the league in strikeouts (230), innings pitched (233.2), complete games (five), shutouts (three) and quality starts (27).

NOTES ON DICKEY
- Only three-time First Team All-American in Tennessee baseball history
- Inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012

Turning it over to vol66!!
Thanks for the super history of players!
Go Vols!
 

VN Store



Sponsors
 

Top