100% Graduation Rate

Do you think the 100% graduation rate could play a negative role in our recruiting?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Possibly, but not much

  • Just another excuse


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#1

mlindsay

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#1
Our Lady Vols has had great success in the classroom. As we've witness recently a lot of players are deciding to be early entries into the WNBA draft and some players are running out of eligibility before getting degrees from the school/schools they've attended. With that being said, what impact do you think our perfect graduation rate has on recruiting?
 
#2

VA_VOLFAN

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#2
Our Lady Vols has had great success in the classroom. As we've witness recently a lot of players are deciding to be early entries into the WNBA draft and some players are running out of eligibility before getting degrees from the school/schools they've attended. With that being said, what impact do you think our perfect graduation rate has on recruiting?
I think it's a positive when talking to parents and you tell them HOW you get them there academically. For transfers it may be a turnoff because if they want to leave early to go pro this ain't the place you.
 
#3

Amb3096

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#3
It's a non-issue IMO...neither a negative or a positive. A college degree does not hold the same level of prestige today as it did in years past. It's going to be more like the men's game, where the top players are attending college as a prerequisite for their pro basketball career
 
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#4

ArmchairQB

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#4
Just looked it up, and the average WNBA salary is around $120k/year, and the max salary was $221k. That's decent money, but it's hardly in "I'm going to go pro and after a few years I'll be set for life" territory. I'd think that completing a degree would still be a really significant goal for the vast majority of women's basketball players, and a 100% graduation rate would be a real asset, not a liability, when talking honestly with prospects about their future.
 
#6

BowlBrother85

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#6
Just looked it up, and the average WNBA salary is around $120k/year, and the max salary was $221k. That's decent money, but it's hardly in "I'm going to go pro and after a few years I'll be set for life" territory. I'd think that completing a degree would still be a really significant goal for the vast majority of women's basketball players, and a 100% graduation rate would be a real asset, not a liability, when talking honestly with prospects about their future.
That's true, and at least as far as the WNBA is concerned, there are limited roster spots compared to the NBA. There are 450 players in the NBA (30 teams with 15 active players). There are only 144 players in the WNBA (12 teams with 12 active players). However, many WNBA players do supplement their income by also playing overseas. Still, a women's player should be very careful about blowing off a college degree as a backup plan.
 
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#7

BowlBrother85

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#7
It's a non-issue IMO...neither a negative or a positive. A college degree does not hold the same level of prestige today as it did in years past. It's going to be more like the men's game, where the top players are attending college as a prerequisite for their pro basketball career
Of course that all depends on the field of study. You can't paint college degrees with a broad brush.
 
#9

FrozenLVFan

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#9
Just looked it up, and the average WNBA salary is around $120k/year, and the max salary was $221k. That's decent money, but it's hardly in "I'm going to go pro and after a few years I'll be set for life" territory. I'd think that completing a degree would still be a really significant goal for the vast majority of women's basketball players, and a 100% graduation rate would be a real asset, not a liability, when talking honestly with prospects about their future.
The salaries for the first three years in the WNBA are $60K to $72K/yr. Rennia Davis signed for $64/K. Aja Wilson made $70K during her recent third year as a pro. Very few players make over $200K/yr. The top players can obviously take home a lot more due to endorsements, but most of the others have to play overseas in the winter to make a decent living. The average career of a WNBA player is about 5 years. The salary cap for each team is $1.3M, which is one reason teams often carry a roster of eleven players even though they're allowed twelve.
 
#10

Amb3096

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#10
The salaries for the first three years in the WNBA are $60K to $72K/yr. Rennia Davis signed for $64/K. Aja Wilson made $70K during her recent third year as a pro. Very few players make over $200K/yr. The top players can obviously take home a lot more due to endorsements, but most of the others have to play overseas in the winter to make a decent living. The average career of a WNBA player is about 5 years. The salary cap for each team is $1.3M, which is one reason teams often carry a roster of eleven players even though they're allowed twelve.
How many of these players will be going to some 9-5 office job after their playing careers are over, or are they going to branch out into other opportunities based on the connections they make during this time?

The concept of a getting a college degree is a nice one, but I'm not sure that it's something that will contribute towards their overall careers for the majority of this audience...unless they are planning on going into something which requires additional education, like a medical or law degree.
 
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#12

BowlBrother85

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#12
How many of these players will be going to some 9-5 office job after their playing careers are over, or are they going to branch out into other opportunities based on the connections they make during this time?

The concept of a getting a college degree is a nice one, but I'm not sure that it's something that will contribute towards their overall careers for the majority of this audience...unless they are planning on going into something which requires additional education, like a medical or law degree.
A majority of careers with high-paying starting salaries require a college degree. For basketball players who have an ambition of coaching at either the high school or collegiate level one day, they will need to have at least a bachelor's degree.
 
#13

BowlBrother85

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#13
I would think this actually HELPS with recruiting especially from the perspective of parents. NOW if the WNBA changes their eligibility requirements to be drafted, we could have problems
There would still be the problem of only 144 roster spots... That sounds like a lot, but it's less than 1/3rd of the NBA's number. The WNBA is only an option for a select few, and even then, it's not money that will provide a lifetime's worth of financial security... unless there are endorsement opportunities, but those are for the Candace Parker's out there.
 
#14

dapeak

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#14
There would still be the problem of only 144 roster spots... That sounds like a lot, but it's less than 1/3rd of the NBA's number. The WNBA is only an option for a select few, and even then, it's not money that will provide a lifetime's worth of financial security... unless there are endorsement opportunities, but those are for the Candace Parker's out there.
Right, but if they lowered the age the likelihood of expansion goes up because it would more than likely happen for the age rule change. Album for these younger players like Bueckers who’ve openly talked about playing pro early.. it could be worth it with NIL’s and the increase in endorsements many players are beginning to get in the league. Social media influence makes this a different league now exposure wise. It’d be smart to really invest in the W somehow now.
 
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#15

mlindsay

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#15
There would still be the problem of only 144 roster spots... That sounds like a lot, but it's less than 1/3rd of the NBA's number. The WNBA is only an option for a select few, and even then, it's not money that will provide a lifetime's worth of financial security... unless there are endorsement opportunities, but those are for the Candace Parker's out there.
I think apart of it also is veteran staying well past their prime or players in the league that shouldn't be but are only their because of college affiliations.

Taurasi and Sue has shown the past couple of seasons (with the amount of games they have missed and their inability to guard anyone) that it is about time to hang it up, yet both are hanging around looking for another Olympic opportunity. Other players have shown that they are just not very good and are taking up roster spots or players sitting out and teams are holding cap space/roster spots just in case they return.

For example, why hasn't Maya Moore announced her retirement from the league? Every year the Lynx have to go into their offseason with their hands tied just in case she decides to return. Washington held out space for a while hoping Emma Messeman would return, Dallas for a couple years was waiting to see what Moriah Jefferson would do. Something could be done (prior to expansion) so that players are holding onto spots that other players should have the chance to have.
 
#16

mlindsay

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#16
There would still be the problem of only 144 roster spots... That sounds like a lot, but it's less than 1/3rd of the NBA's number. The WNBA is only an option for a select few, and even then, it's not money that will provide a lifetime's worth of financial security... unless there are endorsement opportunities, but those are for the Candace Parker's out there.
I think apart of it also is veteran staying well past their prime or players in the league that shouldn't be but are only their because of college affiliations.

Taurasi and Sue has shown the past couple of seasons (with the amount of games they have missed and their inability to guard anyone) that it is about time to hang it up, yet both are hanging around looking for another Olympic opportunity. Other players have shown that they are just not very good and are taking up roster spots or players sitting out and teams are holding cap space/roster spots just in case they return.

For example, why hasn't Maya Moore announced her retirement from the league? Every year the Lynx have to go into their offseason with their hands tied just in case she decides to return. Washington held out space for a while hoping Emma Messeman would return, Dallas for a couple years was waiting to see what Moriah Jefferson would do. Something could be done (prior to expansion) so that players are holding onto spots that other players should have the chance to have.
 
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#18

Amb3096

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#18
I think apart of it also is veteran staying well past their prime or players in the league that shouldn't be but are only their because of college affiliations.

Taurasi and Sue has shown the past couple of seasons (with the amount of games they have missed and their inability to guard anyone) that it is about time to hang it up, yet both are hanging around looking for another Olympic opportunity. Other players have shown that they are just not very good and are taking up roster spots or players sitting out and teams are holding cap space/roster spots just in case they return.

For example, why hasn't Maya Moore announced her retirement from the league? Every year the Lynx have to go into their offseason with their hands tied just in case she decides to return. Washington held out space for a while hoping Emma Messeman would return, Dallas for a couple years was waiting to see what Moriah Jefferson would do. Something could be done (prior to expansion) so that players are holding onto spots that other players should have the chance to have.
I don't have issues with Bird and Taurasi extending their careers, because they are still elite players. Seattle looked lost when Canada was running the point in Bird's absence, and Taurasi was instrumental in Phoenix beating Vegas to make the WNBA finals. Hell, I'd want to extend my career as long as possible too. Ultimately, it becomes the coache/GMs responsibility to look at their roster, and if a player isn't cutting it...not matter how much they gave to the franchise...then they have to have the stones to move in a different direction. The same is true for the Olympic selection.

I do place a lot of blame on the younger players simply not stepping up...both in training camp as well as during the season. It's no secret that there's a limited number of slots, and that training camp is basically a Darwin-inspired gladiator battle. If the young players can't come in and shine, then they can expect to be cut. I'm sure the teams would rather have a productive young player than a mediocre veteran, so it's on them to take it for themselves.

I didn't know that Maya hasn't officially retired yet. From the looks of her recent pictures, I'm amazed that Minnesota hasn't made that decision for her. But again...that's on them. I can see why Washington held out for Emma, but their hand is being forced now that some of the cheap, young players are looking for more of a payday.

College affiliations are also a decision for the front office to make. Is keeping a Whalen/McCarville in Minnesota worth it (even in the twilight of their careers) if it gives the team additional exposure? I'd say yes. Same with teams trying to land local homegrown players (Parker in Chicago is a perfect example). There is no right to playing in the league. You have to prove your value, either as a player or an asset. If you can't, then there's no future in the league.
 
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#19

vettefool

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#19
There would still be the problem of only 144 roster spots... That sounds like a lot, but it's less than 1/3rd of the NBA's number. The WNBA is only an option for a select few, and even then, it's not money that will provide a lifetime's worth of financial security... unless there are endorsement opportunities, but those are for the Candace Parker's out there.
Dont follow wnba but I believe there are quite a few foreign player in wnba. Many don’t attend college in USA. That would reduce available slots on rosters
 
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