Why We Must Do All We Can to Try and Have College Sports

#77

barney

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#77
You are going to be very disappointed in life, then. People get sick, and unfortunately, people die. The question is: how far should we go as a society to keep people from catching infections?

There are a whole bunch of things that you should fear more than CV19 when you leave your house. Meningitis, pneumonia, RMSF, RSV, bacterial enterocolitis, even influenza have significantly higher mortality rates than CV19 in young/healthy individuals. The numbers are hard to nail down, but I think we are still at around ten pediatric deaths in the entire nation, and most/all had significant comorbidities.
this is missing the point. We have about 925,000 hospital beds in this country. If we allow this disease to spread uncontrolled through the population, every hospital bed will be occupied. Voluntary procedures and treatment for other medical problems becomes impossible due to lack of capacity. If you have a heart attack in such conditions, you're dead. Just look at what is happening in Texas this week. They thought they had the virus under control and began to reopen prematurely. In a few weeks, it'll be New York City all over again.
 
#80

Pride85

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#80
The 19 in COVID-19 is the year it was discovered, not the 19th strain. Good Lord
You are correct. I did get the designation wrong. I did not however incorrectly speak about the mutations. According to multiple sources ranging from CDC to Harvard to John Hopkins to regular media outlets, there are as many as thirty. As Barney pointed out, none have been significant enough protein variations to warrant a new strain? Since the infected host is the source of the mutations, how many more variations will happen before the much anticipated vaccine hits the shelves and how will these viral variants work with the virus.
I do apologize for my ignorance of the 19 designation. Wasn’t my first mistake and probably will not be my last. I made an assumption and we all know what that does. 😇
 
#81

OldandStillaVol

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#81
You are correct. I did get the designation wrong. I did not however incorrectly speak about the mutations. According to multiple sources ranging from CDC to Harvard to John Hopkins to regular media outlets, there are as many as thirty. As Barney pointed out, none have been significant enough protein variations to warrant a new strain? Since the infected host is the source of the mutations, how many more variations will happen before the much anticipated vaccine hits the shelves and how will these viral variants work with the virus.
I do apologize for my ignorance of the 19 designation. Wasn’t my first mistake and probably will not be my last. I made an assumption and we all know what that does. 😇
We just don’t know how effective vaccines being investigated now will be for future mutations. That is why it’s essential to test a wide variety of potential vaccines now (and not wait and do this sequentially). It’s speculation on my part but I think we will see a reasonably effective vaccine available in 2021. Even when the first one becomes available, we need to continue and investigate better ones.
 
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#84

Dumbledorange

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#84
You probably have already had it yet you could still enjoy a steak and a Coors Light with family. I'm not saying we should have football. In some ways this is a time for people to adjust to other things that are important but I think sports is needed to level the rigors of life. With that said, that is why sports shouldn't mix with other things.
Nope, tested negative. Twice.
 
#85

37620VOL

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#85
Just a question, how much does football raise COVID risk? (Going to class + football vs Going to class + plus all the other things athletes will do absent football required activities)
 
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#89

Pride85

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#89
We just don’t know how effective vaccines being investigated now will be for future mutations. That is why it’s essential to test a wide variety of potential vaccines now (and not wait and do this sequentially). It’s speculation on my part but I think we will see a reasonably effective vaccine available in 2021. Even when the first one becomes available, we need to continue and investigate better ones.
Right on the money. My original point was that if the availability of a reliable and effective vaccine for SAHRS-Cov-2 is the criteria for moving for forward with life as close to normal as possible, it may be a while.
 
#91

BigBadVol

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#91
this is missing the point. We have about 925,000 hospital beds in this country. If we allow this disease to spread uncontrolled through the population, every hospital bed will be occupied. Voluntary procedures and treatment for other medical problems becomes impossible due to lack of capacity. If you have a heart attack in such conditions, you're dead. Just look at what is happening in Texas this week. They thought they had the virus under control and began to reopen prematurely. In a few weeks, it'll be New York City all over again.
You know with the the exception of a few hospitals, they sat empty. Don’t believe the BS! Several of my friends, all doctors, have called it a joke. People that needed surgeries couldn’t get them yet beds sat empty. You watch too much CNN and others. Doctors and nurses have been laid off. It’s absolute BS!
 
#92

barney

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#92
You know with the the exception of a few hospitals, they sat empty. Don’t believe the BS! Several of my friends, all doctors, have called it a joke. People that needed surgeries couldn’t get them yet beds sat empty. You watch too much CNN and others. Doctors and nurses have been laid off. It’s absolute BS!
The reason why beds sat empty is because we took aggressive measures to control the spread of the pandemic. Doing nothing or going back to business as usual means exponential caseloads and full hospital beds.
 
#93

Dumbledorange

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#93
You know with the the exception of a few hospitals, they sat empty. Don’t believe the BS! Several of my friends, all doctors, have called it a joke.
You sick a lot if not, don't believe you.

People that needed surgeries couldn’t get them yet beds sat empty. You watch too much CNN and others. Doctors and nurses have been laid off. It’s absolute BS!
No wonder your "doctor friends" are pissed. they got laid off and are too stupid to go to 1,000 of patient care facilities where they are desperately needed.

Your "doctors" are self-identified idiots.
 
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#94

vols40

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#94
I don’t think it’s happening, or if it does, it will be short lived because probably a week into the season there will be outbreaks on campuses or within football programs. Once that happens the overreactions will ensue and everything will be shut down again. This will be life in America until there is a reliable vaccine.
If this happens there will be a large segment of the population who will no longer be able to attend sporting events.
 
#95

vols40

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#95
The reason why beds sat empty is because we took aggressive measures to control the spread of the pandemic. Doing nothing or going back to business as usual means exponential caseloads and full hospital beds.
And it was wrong. Cases are going back up daily now and hospitals are just fine. Shutting down the country in the manner we did turned out to be the wrong decision.
 
#96

barney

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#96
And it was wrong. Cases are going back up daily now and hospitals are just fine. Shutting down the country in the manner we did turned out to be the wrong decision.
Do you know the meaning of the word "exponential"? If hospitalizations continue to rise by a factor of 10, as they have in some parts of Texas, our hospital capacity will not be "fine".
 
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#99

vols40

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#99
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barney

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Thanks for the citation but if you are trying to convince me of your argument a known left wing source such as Guardian will not do it.

How about citation from a more centered group.

It's going to be ok.

Association: Texas hospitals have capacity to handle COVID influx
The Texas hospital association is a trade group, they don't have much to do with the day to function of Frontline hospitals. Texas medical center has projected that they will exhaust their surge capacity in two weeks if caseloads continue growing at current rates. 20200624_204346.jpg
 

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