Why We Must Do All We Can to Try and Have College Sports

#1

SNAFU

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#1
Seth Emerson from The Athletic sums it up nicely, IMO.

"College athletics faces a bad choice and a worse choice. The bad choice is trying to play through a pandemic. The worse choice is giving up before trying to have a season.

It’s easy — and wrong — to simply write off the motivation to play as financial. That gives it a nefarious undertone. But there are real-life implications to those financials. Jobs and livelihoods that would be lost without a season. They don’t trump the health of the participants. It just means that it’s worth trying to see if you can thread that needle."
 
#2

The Original Fade

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#2
I don’t think it’s happening, or if it does, it will be short lived because probably a week into the season there will be outbreaks on campuses or within football programs. Once that happens the overreactions will ensue and everything will be shut down again. This will be life in America until there is a reliable vaccine.
 
#5

CINCYVOL

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#5
I don’t think it’s happening, or if it does, it will be short lived because probably a week into the season there will be outbreaks on campuses or within football programs. Once that happens the overreactions will ensue and everything will be shut down again. This will be life in America until there is a reliable vaccine.
This is what I don’t understand. We were told that we could only slow the spread in an effort to not overwhelm our healthcare system. This would indicate that you can’t stop it, you can only slow it down. Now it seems we are being told that we need to stop the spread, but that seems pretty much impossible, the goalposts have been moved. I guess it’s up to the folks that “control” the data ultimately, but just using common sense tells me if it’s okay to protest en masse, or have political rallies, then it’s okay to play football.
 
#8

kiddiedoc

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#8
As a physician, I will say that "months away" from a vaccine is extremely unlikely. IF one is developed that proves to offer immunity, safety trials will then be needed, followed by time for production.

The exception would be if the early data on the MMR is confirmed. If we just need to give adults a booster, that would be simple.
 
#10

The Original Fade

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#10
As a physician, I will say that "months away" from a vaccine is extremely unlikely. IF one is developed that proves to offer immunity, safety trials will then be needed, followed by time for production.

The exception would be if the early data on the MMR is confirmed. If we just need to give adults a booster, that would be simple.
Safety data is assessed in phase 2 of trials which are underway as we speak for several vaccines. Some are scheduled for phase 3 as early as later this summer. Not inconceivable that early Spring 2021 we could have one available for front line healthcare workers then the general population shortly after
 
#11

Zues1

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#11
Here's a scenario, the season begins. Tennessee looks like the best in the country and could win it all. Off to a 6-0 start. Covid19 spreads like a wildfire throughout the college Athletics. The season is shutdown mid season. The recruiting falls apart, players leave. Coaches leave. It's the Tennessee way.
 
#15
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#15
a vaccine only gives immunity. Contracting the disease and overcoming it also gives immunity. If you are under fifty and in good health, you have very little to worry about, and a large percentage of the sports world, both players and attendees, fit into this category.

The elderly and those thought to be at risk should watch sports at home on their big flat screen. Those young and not at risk of death can do as they please without guilt or fear.

Think about most football players who test positive don't have any idea that they are ill!

We have been fed a bunch of BS by those with a hidden agenda!
 
#16

BigOrangeMojo

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#16
Here's a scenario, the season begins. Tennessee looks like the best in the country and could win it all. Off to a 6-0 start. Covid19 spreads like a wildfire throughout the college Athletics. The season is shutdown mid season. The recruiting falls apart, players leave. Coaches leave. It's the Tennessee way.
And a 5-1 Bama team with a loss to UT will declare themselves national champs..
 
#19

Pride85

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#19
I don’t think it’s happening, or if it does, it will be short lived because probably a week into the season there will be outbreaks on campuses or within football programs. Once that happens the overreactions will ensue and everything will be shut down again. This will be life in America until there is a reliable vaccine.
Unfortunately, a reliable vaccine may never happen. We have had flu vaccines for decades. How effective are they?
 
#21

barney

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#21
Unfortunately, a reliable vaccine may never happen. We have had flu vaccines for decades. How effective are they?
How reliable is the vaccine for smallpox or measles? The flu is a different virus that mutates at an extremely rapid rate, which makes it more difficult to vaccinate against. Influenza is also a virus that our immune systems are familiar with and some people already have immunity to one of the influenza sub-types. The reason why the flu vaccine isn't 100% protective is because there are a number of different types of flu circulating in a population. Public health officials have to make educated predictions about which influenza type will be most prevalent in a given season and then manufacture a vaccine that defends against that type. In years where a type of flu is more prevalent than they predicted, people who got vaccinated could still catch the flu.

We don't have this problem with covid-19 because the genetic profile of the virus does not rapidly mutate like influenza does. This means that we can expect the vaccine against this virus to have a very high rate of reliability once it is ready for manufacture.
 
#22

VolRoger

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#22
How reliable is the vaccine for smallpox or measles? The flu is a different virus that mutates at an extremely rapid rate, which makes it more difficult to vaccinate against. Influenza is also a virus that our immune systems are familiar with and some people already have immunity to one of the influenza sub-types. The reason why the flu vaccine isn't 100% protective is because there are a number of different types of flu circulating in a population. Public health officials have to make educated predictions about which influenza type will be most prevalent in a given season and then manufacture a vaccine that defends against that type. In years where a type of flu is more prevalent than they predicted, people who got vaccinated could still catch the flu.

We don't have this problem with covid-19 because the genetic profile of the virus does not rapidly mutate like influenza does. This means that we can expect the vaccine against this virus to have a very high rate of reliability once it is ready for manufacture.
Friend, I really hope you are right. I also hope we can accelerate the development and production of the vaccine so that it gets to the public before the onset of the flu season this late fall. I would trade a fall season without football for an effective treatment any day. People tend to forget that a football game is not the only entertainment and other events people more at risk to COVID-19 complications attend. How many weddings, funerals, graduations, live concerts and other performances will people at risk be forced to miss? And what of those people say are not at high risk? Should they be allowed to participate in sports and other events just because their risk of complications are low? They can still transmit the virus to those at risk. If fans attend games, shouldn’t they be forced to quarantine for 14 days afterwards so they don’t risk spreading the virus that most won’t even know they caught? Controlling this seems doubtful.
 
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#23

barney

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#23
Friend, I really hope you are right. I also hope we can accelerate the development and production of the vaccine so that it gets to the public before the onset of the flu season this late fall. I would trade a fall season without football for an effective treatment any day. People tend to forget that a football game is not the only entertainment and other events people more at risk to COVID-19 complications attend. How many weddings, funerals, graduations, live concerts and other performances will people at risk be forced to miss? And what of those people say are not at high risk? Should they be allowed to participate in sports and other events just because their risk of complications are low? They can still transmit the virus to those at risk. If fans attend games, shouldn’t they be forced to quarantine for 14 days afterwards so they don’t risk spreading the virus that most won’t even know they caught? Controlling this seems doubtful.
I share the sentiment, but I don't think a vaccine will be widely available till next summer. Distribution is going to be a logistical nightmare, and the vulnerable and medical professionals will probably be the first to receive a dose. I'm just hoping that a single dose will provide long-term immunity. It'll suck if it has to be re-administered every three months or whatever.
 
#24

Pride85

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#24
How reliable is the vaccine for smallpox or measles? The flu is a different virus that mutates at an extremely rapid rate, which makes it more difficult to vaccinate against. Influenza is also a virus that our immune systems are familiar with and some people already have immunity to one of the influenza sub-types. The reason why the flu vaccine isn't 100% protective is because there are a number of different types of flu circulating in a population. Public health officials have to make educated predictions about which influenza type will be most prevalent in a given season and then manufacture a vaccine that defends against that type. In years where a type of flu is more prevalent than they predicted, people who got vaccinated could still catch the flu.

We don't have this problem with covid-19 because the genetic profile of the virus does not rapidly mutate like influenza does. This means that we can expect the vaccine against this virus to have a very high rate of reliability once it is ready for manufacture.
Any virus “mutates”. Remember, the is is COVID-19. The 19th known strain. You missed the entire point of my post. If we wait for an “effective” vaccine to go on with life, just hang it up. The issue with a viral vaccine is it relies on a healthy immune system to respond. The injected person’s immune system has to create the B cells, T cells and antibodies itself. Antibiotics don’t work because a virus is not alive. If a person’s immune system is compromised, NO viral vaccine will help them. The chunks of protein that are injected will just float around until finally expelled by the body.
 
#25

37620VOL

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#25
As a physician, I will say that "months away" from a vaccine is extremely unlikely. IF one is developed that proves to offer immunity, safety trials will then be needed, followed by time for production.

The exception would be if the early data on the MMR is confirmed. If we just need to give adults a booster, that would be simple.
Moderna's vaccine is going Phase 3 in July. If successful, we should have vaccines in production by year-end.
 

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