Whisky, bourbon or scotch and what's your favorite?

HoptownVol

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That's because you got busted and don't know what you think you know. And you dang sure don't know how to accept that my tastes in whisky says I find Scotch and Irish to be similar TO ME, barring the peaty ones. Has nothing to do with the legalities.

And since you jumped my pony from the get go and started your run, throw some historical facts out about where Bourbon came from that disputes the Historical facts I just provided you. Bourbon began as a modified Scotch bill, from the Scots, that settled the Bourbon region in an attempt to imitate the peat they no longer had. Period. Happy reading.
"Busted" how exactly? I just reposted all the silly BS you were blabbing about without any real knowledge of anything claiming Irish and Scotch are the same thing, Scotch and bourbon are the same thing, then bourbon and TN whiskey is the same thing. And I have no idea what "legalities" has to do with anything, you're really out there dude. Now this.....

Bourbon began as a modified Scotch bill, from the Scots, that settled the Bourbon region
So now the "Bourbon Region" is in the Blue Ridge Mountains is it? LOL Scotch is made from barley, bourbon is 51% corn, but yeah its the same thing. Do you see how ridiculous your arguments are, no of course you don't. The reason I "jumped your pony" was your idiotic claim that Irish and Scotch were the same, regardless of your distorted view of history different ingredients and different processes yield much different whiskeys so no, they are not the same and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody that knows anything about either style that would agree with you. Everybody on this board knows what they like and nobody needs a lecture from you, particularly when you are winding on and on about historical "facts" when most are not.

Now for the record I don't care if you find Scotch and Irish "similar," you should have stopped there. Where you went off the rails was your blanket statement of indisputable fact that they are the same thing, so much so you even went on to infer that Irish Whiskey could even be labeled Scotch, if it was "legal." My interest is Irish Whiskey, most of my posts on this board are on Irish, and I post on 2 other whiskey forums and I have never seen such pompous blather from somebody that knows so little about the subject matter.
 
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GVF

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"Busted" how exactly? I just reposted all the silly BS you were blabbing about without any real knowledge of anything claiming Irish and Scotch are the same thing, Scotch and bourbon are the same thing, then bourbon and TN whiskey is the same thing. And I have no idea what "legalities" has to do with anything, you're really out there dude. Now this.....



So now the "Bourbon Region" is in the Blue Ridge Mountains is it? LOL Scotch is made from barley, bourbon is 51% corn, but yeah its the same thing. Do you see how ridiculous your arguments are, no of course you don't. The reason I "jumped your pony" was your idiotic claim that Irish and Scotch were the same, regardless of your distorted view of history different ingredients and different processes yield much different whiskeys so no, they are not the same and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody that knows anything about either style that would agree with you. Everybody on this board knows what they like and nobody needs a lecture from you, particularly when you are winding on and on about historical "facts" when most are not.

Now for the record I don't care if you find Scotch and Irish "similar," you should have stopped there. Where you went off the rails was your blanket statement of indisputable fact that they are the same thing, so much so you even went on to infer that Irish Whiskey could even be labeled Scotch, if it was "legal." My interest is Irish Whiskey, most of my posts on this board are on Irish, and I post on 2 other whiskey forums and I have never seen such pompous blather from somebody that knows so little about the subject matter. Now run along googleboy, go find some more indisputable facts that nobody cares about. ha ha
Again, your reading comprehension is lacking. Bourbon IS NOT Scotch. Bourbon EVOLVED from Scotch. That's all I said, and it's not hard to find. The bourbon region is this side of the mountains, not THE Blue Ridge mountains. But the Scots and others settled that area and this area. Corn replaced Barley in the whisky they distilled here, because barley DID NOT produce well in the locals soils. And corn did. That's one way Bourbon EVOLVED from their SCOTCH recipe when they got around here. Another is they no longer HAD PEAT. So the SCOTS experimented with other grains and charred barrels trying to REPLICATE the PEATY TASTE of their homeland Scotch. My God, did you not read anything, or are you sitting at your bar drunk. The SCOTS took their SCOTCH recipe and modified it to what was available to them here to best make the whisky they knew be as close to it as they could. TA DA...American Scotch becomes .... Bourbon.
 

GVF

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"Busted" how exactly? I just reposted all the silly BS you were blabbing about without any real knowledge of anything claiming Irish and Scotch are the same thing, Scotch and bourbon are the same thing, then bourbon and TN whiskey is the same thing. And I have no idea what "legalities" has to do with anything, you're really out there dude. Now this.....



So now the "Bourbon Region" is in the Blue Ridge Mountains is it? LOL Scotch is made from barley, bourbon is 51% corn, but yeah its the same thing. Do you see how ridiculous your arguments are, no of course you don't. The reason I "jumped your pony" was your idiotic claim that Irish and Scotch were the same, regardless of your distorted view of history different ingredients and different processes yield much different whiskeys so no, they are not the same and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody that knows anything about either style that would agree with you. Everybody on this board knows what they like and nobody needs a lecture from you, particularly when you are winding on and on about historical "facts" when most are not.

Now for the record I don't care if you find Scotch and Irish "similar," you should have stopped there. Where you went off the rails was your blanket statement of indisputable fact that they are the same thing, so much so you even went on to infer that Irish Whiskey could even be labeled Scotch, if it was "legal." My interest is Irish Whiskey, most of my posts on this board are on Irish, and I post on 2 other whiskey forums and I have never seen such pompous blather from somebody that knows so little about the subject matter.
You wouldn't hear so much pompous blather if you'd shut up. I'm sure posting on two other whiskey boards makes you an expert. So much so, you don't even know the basic origins of bourbon. I openly claimed I was no expert. Yet you don't. But, I have read enough out of interest to know the basic origins and legalities to claim to be a certain whisky.

Let's go back to Bourbon for a sec. Ezra Brooks has a charcoal filtered Bourbon. Here's your chance to actually give an educated answer. How does charcoal filtering a bourbon not then make it a Tennessee style sipping whisky? I'm sure they aren't the only filtered bourbon. Unfiltered, a 51% corn bill can legally be a bourbon or a whisky, but only kentucky if it's in state. But, a 51% mash bill cannot be Tennessee whisky unless it is maple charcoal filtered. So is Ezra Brooks using a different wood charcoal to remain a bourbon?

Didn't go that far. I'm well aware they can Scotch/Irish are not and never have been legally the same. Any indication they were was from my taste buds only. You're lighting that one a wee bit much.
 

GVF

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"Busted" how exactly? I just reposted all the silly BS you were blabbing about without any real knowledge of anything claiming Irish and Scotch are the same thing, Scotch and bourbon are the same thing, then bourbon and TN whiskey is the same thing. And I have no idea what "legalities" has to do with anything, you're really out there dude. Now this.....



So now the "Bourbon Region" is in the Blue Ridge Mountains is it? LOL Scotch is made from barley, bourbon is 51% corn, but yeah its the same thing. Do you see how ridiculous your arguments are, no of course you don't. The reason I "jumped your pony" was your idiotic claim that Irish and Scotch were the same, regardless of your distorted view of history different ingredients and different processes yield much different whiskeys so no, they are not the same and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody that knows anything about either style that would agree with you. Everybody on this board knows what they like and nobody needs a lecture from you, particularly when you are winding on and on about historical "facts" when most are not.

Now for the record I don't care if you find Scotch and Irish "similar," you should have stopped there. Where you went off the rails was your blanket statement of indisputable fact that they are the same thing, so much so you even went on to infer that Irish Whiskey could even be labeled Scotch, if it was "legal." My interest is Irish Whiskey, most of my posts on this board are on Irish, and I post on 2 other whiskey forums and I have never seen such pompous blather from somebody that knows so little about the subject matter.
Didn't get into historical facts until you mouthed off and proved you could use a few. the original brewers of Bourbon began with their Scotch recipe. Of course their different and taste different because of changes they had to make to the grains available. CORN Replaced BARLEY in the SCOTCH RECIPE for agricultural reasons in the area. THAT is why bourbon has a corn base and how that came about. But, factually bourbon was born of of the Scots and Irish and others Europeans that brought their brown whisky with them. that settled the Bourbon region. It wasn't just scotch that morphed into Bourbon. Irish did too. They all had to adapt to new ingredients. But, it all started in America as their homeland whisky. Seriously, who do you think brought the whisky recipes that are today's American brown grain whiskies? The American Indian wasn't doing it when we moved in. Whatever American selection one likes has beginnings in Scotland, Ireland and other Euro countries as they migrated here, brought their whisky and recipes, and adapted them to American crops. It all evolved from those immigrants that brought their knowledge with them. and just like differences in Scotch and Irish, you have differences in American brews. But, they all began as a European whisky on American soil.

And if you don't get that the only major legal differentation in Bourbon and Tennessee Whisky is the requirement of Maple Charcoal Filtering to be Whisky, then you really should back off. Because all other minimum specs down to the preferred water source are near identical.
 
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GVF

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"Busted" how exactly? I just reposted all the silly BS you were blabbing about without any real knowledge of anything claiming Irish and Scotch are the same thing, Scotch and bourbon are the same thing, then bourbon and TN whiskey is the same thing. And I have no idea what "legalities" has to do with anything, you're really out there dude. Now this.....



So now the "Bourbon Region" is in the Blue Ridge Mountains is it? LOL Scotch is made from barley, bourbon is 51% corn, but yeah its the same thing. Do you see how ridiculous your arguments are, no of course you don't. The reason I "jumped your pony" was your idiotic claim that Irish and Scotch were the same, regardless of your distorted view of history different ingredients and different processes yield much different whiskeys so no, they are not the same and you'd be hard pressed to find anybody that knows anything about either style that would agree with you. Everybody on this board knows what they like and nobody needs a lecture from you, particularly when you are winding on and on about historical "facts" when most are not.

Now for the record I don't care if you find Scotch and Irish "similar," you should have stopped there. Where you went off the rails was your blanket statement of indisputable fact that they are the same thing, so much so you even went on to infer that Irish Whiskey could even be labeled Scotch, if it was "legal." My interest is Irish Whiskey, most of my posts on this board are on Irish, and I post on 2 other whiskey forums and I have never seen such pompous blather from somebody that knows so little about the subject matter.
Seriously though aside from who claims to know what—-

I’m headed to store with a C note. What would you recommend to try. I very much respect that your into Irish and a little Scotch and that’s what I like to drink. But I’ve only stuck to some lower priced pretty decent ones so far.
 

GVF

Absolut Orange
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BTW any Irish Whiskey fans out there this is the find of 2021. Busker has replaced Jameson as my daily drinker, Wine Enthusiast scored it an insane 94.... and its under 30 bucks.



View attachment 422779
The store I had time to stop at did not carry this brand and they were out of redbreast. I had a free C note in my paycheck so I picked up a bottle of Dead Rabbit Irish, and Glenmorangie 10 Original for the Scotch. A little deviation from my liking of Tullamore and Proper 12 to try something a little up the ladder.
 

GVF

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Well. I have had a lip taste of the Dead Rabbit Irish. I have yet to drink any Irish orScotch that bold. Definitely different. Actually pretty good. I’ll just have to get used to it. Not an every day sipper I suppose.
 

GVF

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After about a week with my recent gets as a non hardened whisky sipper.

Tullamore Dew Cider Cask. Very nice $25 Irish. Not quite as “light” as the green label triple cask. But a very nice play on a drink that doesn’t break the bank.

JD Single Barrel Select. A gift. I was only one that drank from it last holiday and it was exactly where I left it. Only two shots from full. This year it was sent home with me. What can I say. Not a JD person per se but that is a fine sip.

Glenmorangie 10 year orange box. Definitely a good beginner Scotch for me but smokier than I had thought. Never had. Not sure what I was expecting. So far my Scotch has been either Speyside or Speyburn. Can’t remember which. But very light if any peat on those two. It is dryer than expected but I guess that’s the malted barley verses unmalted.

The Dead Rabbit Irish. The Busker was out of stock so this was a blind pick only by suggestion of the clerk. Had no idea what I was getting. It is blended. Ended up being a bit peaty, but since I’m just now venturing into the Smokey ones not sure if it’s considered medium or light. Pretty sure wouldn’t be a heavy. Dead Rabbit has been very satisfying. Especially with a splash of water. Becoming my favorite thus far. And under $40.
 

WestTennesseeVol

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Nice. I think it is a good thing I cannot walk to Michter’s I used to live in wine country and that was pretty dangerous.

I grew up in Memphis.
Hah, I don’t visit the distilleries as much as I thought I would. Partly due to Covid, partly due to losing its luster a little bit when you pass them everyday. I have to talk to my buddies back in Tennessee to appreciate I can still find regular Buffalo Trace on the shelves.

Very cool, my parents and grandparents are still kicking around in the 901, always fun to go to Beale or the zoo with the wife.
 

WestTennesseeVol

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So, what's the deal with a straight rye. I see quite a few comments in here about liking ryes. Doesn't a straight rye have a hard bite?
Depends on your palate I guess. One of the best rye whiskeys I’ve had was aged 36 months in a 15 gallon barrel, super young and grassy but I love that flavor profile.
 

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