Whisky, bourbon or scotch and what's your favorite?

TNnative

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This is going to look pretty cool on my son's bar. Sails and the base made from beer cans.

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Anybody living near Columbia I can tell you where to go to find this guy. He does mostly UT but can manage most college teams, even Vandy. He'll also have both Super Bowl teams represented and will be auctioned off at Backstreet Tavern, Columbia's finest watering hole.

He does Vandy? Must be desperate.

Oh, Jim Beam. Black label.
 

05_never_again

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I haven't but hear great things about it. It's on my wish list list along with Glenmorangie and The Macallan.
It's smooth as silk. Really good. I am a bourbon drinker normally, don't drink much or know much about Irish whiskey (don't feel like I know a whole lot about bourbon either, I just like to drink it) but this stuff is really good.
 

GVF

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BTW any Irish Whiskey fans out there this is the find of 2021. Busker has replaced Jameson as my daily drinker, Wine Enthusiast scored it an insane 94.... and its under 30 bucks.



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I've seen it. I'm definitely an Irish/Scotch guy. Prefer over any other spirit. I ditched Jameson when I found Tullamore Dew, Slane, and Proper 12 for the daily drinker price group. ($20-$26). I'll definitely have to try this.

Maybe I'm a little off. But, IMO Irish and Scotch are basically the same whiskys, buy you can't call Irish a Scotch legally. My taste buds find little difference in the two, especially when you factor in the smokiness of the different brands. The Appalachian backwoods definitely benefitted from my Scottish ancestors and immigrants.
 

GVF

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It's smooth as silk. Really good. I am a bourbon drinker normally, don't drink much or know much about Irish whiskey (don't feel like I know a whole lot about bourbon either, I just like to drink it) but this stuff is really good.
I'm not a big drinker. I have beers I like but I buy for taste, not getting drunk. I'm a wine person, and whiskys have as much variance as wine. It's easy to get lost and confused. I learned early on not to be a wine snub, cause it's easy to find a fantastic wine under $12. A'm not sure why I prefer the Scotch/Irish over American whisky except that maybe it is smoother. I find alot of American whisky to have a pretty harsh bite for me. I will concede Maker's Mark, and Wild Turkey to be fine American sips however. I will also acknowledge JD Single Barrel Select as a pleasant drink as well. Outside of those 3, it's back accross the pond. Buffalo Trace was a quick NO for me. Heck, one of my favorite sips we buy for winter medical use. Mr. Boston Rock and Rye. $10.50. Granted it's sweet to the liquor side and has a lemon in it. We use it for congestion, but it's not a bad sip.

I grew up watching ole Justin the cajun cook on TV. Loved him. At the end of each show he always put his meal of the show at his table and sat down with a glass of wine. He would say in his accent, "people ask me all the time what wine go with this and what wine go with that. I just tell them whatever wine you like." So, that has always been my take on buying for myself. Price and label are indifferent in most cases.
 
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HoptownVol

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I've seen it. I'm definitely an Irish/Scotch guy. Prefer over any other spirit. I ditched Jameson when I found Tullamore Dew, Slane, and Proper 12 for the daily drinker price group. ($20-$26). I'll definitely have to try this.

Maybe I'm a little off. But, IMO Irish and Scotch are basically the same whiskys, buy you can't call Irish a Scotch legally. My taste buds find little difference in the two, especially when you factor in the smokiness of the different brands. The Appalachian backwoods definitely benefitted from my Scottish ancestors and immigrants.
Disagree about that, and Irish Whiskey ain't Irish Whiskey unless its made in Ireland so why in Hell would anybody want to call it Scotch?
 

GVF

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Disagree about that, and Irish Whiskey ain't Irish Whiskey unless its made in Ireland so why in Hell would anybody want to call it Scotch?
I know that. I'm not calling it scotch. I'm saying they are quite similar whiskys, and are differentiated more so by where they are legally made, than by the whisky itself. I drink both, and I did say for me I find little difference in the two. They are produced in similar fashion, mainly separated by their legal production locale.
 

05_never_again

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I know that. I'm not calling it scotch. I'm saying they are quite similar whiskys, and are differentiated more so by where they are legally made, than by the whisky itself. I drink both, and I did say for me I find little difference in the two. They are produced in similar fashion, mainly separated by their legal production locale.
Hmm. Scotch tastes a lot different to me than Irish whiskey or bourbon. Scotch has that peat smokiness to it that bourbon and Irish whisky does not.

I know multiple bourbon drinkers who can't stand scotch, and vice versa. They don't really taste the same.
 

GVF

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Hmm. Scotch tastes a lot different to me than Irish whiskey or bourbon. Scotch has that peat smokiness to it that bourbon and Irish whisky does not.
Scotch has a very wide spectrum from no peat at all to heavy smoked, and from single malt barley to multi-grain. It seems to be very regional. Irish probably tends to lay off the peat smoke, but it is very comparable to the not so peaty Scotches. Maybe it's my ancestry, and I'm no Scotch expert by any means, but I have a very historical interest in the drink which has led me to alot of interest reading, and docu-shows on amazon Prime.
 

HoptownVol

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Scotch has a very wide spectrum from no peat at all to heavy smoked, and from single malt barley to multi-grain. It seems to be very regional. Irish probably tends to lay off the peat smoke, but it is very comparable to the not so peaty Scotches. Maybe it's my ancestry, and I'm no Scotch expert by any means, but I have a very historical interest in the drink which has led me to alot of interest reading, and docu-shows on amazon Prime.
Glad you like to read, when you dig into this you'll find Scotch and Irish Whiskey are nothing alike, basically like saying bourbon and Tennessee Sipping Whiskey is the same thing.
 

GVF

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It's smooth as silk. Really good. I am a bourbon drinker normally, don't drink much or know much about Irish whiskey (don't feel like I know a whole lot about bourbon either, I just like to drink it) but this stuff is really good.
A decent quick read on the two whiskeys but, not exhaustive. If you get from the Spey region, Scotch is lighter and likely not peated much if at all. More toward the Irish spectrum. Highlands will tend be the medium Scotch. The Islays will be the most peaty smoked and is normally the type that puts alot of people off Scotch. Glenmorangie 10 is on the lighter, sweeter side of Scotch and a very good intro under $40. Speyburn or Speyside I tried and was pleasing on the light side of Scotch as well. My nephews boss bought him a bottle of Macallan 12 (roughly $85) for the holidays, and he said it was the best whisky he ever drank. He's 2 minutes down the road, and I didn't even get a taste.
 

05_never_again

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A decent quick read on the two whiskeys but, not exhaustive. If you get from the Spey region, Scotch is lighter and likely not peated much if at all. More toward the Irish spectrum. Highlands will tend be the medium Scotch. The Islays will be the most peaty smoked and is normally the type that puts alot of people off Scotch
It still tastes different even if not peated much, no? Perhaps not, everybody tastes things different.
 

GVF

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Glad you like to read, when you dig into this you'll find Scotch and Irish Whiskey are nothing alike, basically like saying bourbon and Tennessee Sipping Whiskey is the same thing.
I've been dug in for a while. when you dig in you'll see my claim was no more than for my taste they are not much different. I never said they were the same whisky. they can't be and have different legal requirements. But, if you really want to get technical, get back to me when you read up on what bourbon is, and where it originated, and from whom. In a nutshell, it's Scotch, born out of Appalachia, from the immigrants that settled the mountain regions. But, since it's American, it's Bourbon, and has evolved into it's own whisky with as many varieties of drink and Scotch and Irish.
 

GVF

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It still tastes different even if not peated much, no? Perhaps not, everybody tastes things different.
Yes, that's why I like different ones for different reasons. But, I prefer both to American. I just find them similar, not the same. There would be some I probably would never try. I've never tried the heavy peat Islay brews. Not sure I would swing that far on the Scotch. But, I do like the Speys and Highland stuff. Both have obvious different distillations to different ends of all the characteristics. But, there is also just as much difference within their own. You can drink a legal Scotch that is not peated at all. And those would be the ones that are toward the Irish. It is my understanding, the Irish does not use malted barley, and why it is a little sweeter. A malted barley does not mean peated per se, but still will be less sweet even if you don't peat it.
 
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GVF

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Wow, GVF. You know more than I ever will. Used to drink Scotch with a twist. No ice. Think I will stick with Red Stripe.
I'm not close to knowing all that much. Just the basics you can find in historical research and professional reviews. I'd say I'm still pretty novice. Red Stripe is not a bad choice though.
 

GVF

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Glad you like to read, when you dig into this you'll find Scotch and Irish Whiskey are nothing alike, basically like saying bourbon and Tennessee Sipping Whiskey is the same thing.
Well, to be a bourbon the requirement is minimum 51% corn, and is typically brewed of limestone water. Same for Tennessee Sipping Whiskey, except it has to be maple charcoal filtered. Bourbon does not have origin requirements as does Scotch or Irish. You can have a Bourbon from out of state that meets standards and can say Bourbon, but it has to within the US to be a bourbon. Also, it can't say Kentucky Bourbon. Other than charcoal filtering Bourbon and Tennessee Sipping Whisky have near identical ABV, aging standards, and minimum corn requirements in the mash bill. Other ingredients vary for market differentiation, but they both start at 51% corn. The limestone water thing will probably vary, and don't think it's a requirement for either, but it seems preferred if distilling where available, or trucked in maybe ?? Some may say it's not a true whiskey of either if it's not limestone water.
 

HoptownVol

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I've been dug in for a while. when you dig in you'll see my claim was no more than for my taste they are not much different. I never said they were the same whisky. they can't be and have different legal requirements. But, if you really want to get technical, get back to me when you read up on what bourbon is, and where it originated, and from whom. In a nutshell, it's Scotch, born out of Appalachia, from the immigrants that settled the mountain regions. But, since it's American, it's Bourbon, and has evolved into it's own whisky with as many varieties of drink and Scotch and Irish.
This sound familiar?

IMO Irish and Scotch are basically the same whiskys
Then you went on to further claim that the two are "very comparable" and "quite similar" even though they aren't. Now you're telling me that bourbon is scotch.

what bourbon is, and where it originated, and from whom. In a nutshell, it's Scotch


The Scot in me is having a good laugh at you, the Irish in me is saying you don't know what the hell you're talking about. You even think they should call Irish Whiskey "Scotch" because ... you know, its the same thing. LOL

Irish and Scotch are basically the same whiskys, buy you can't call Irish a Scotch legally.
Regardless of your "historical interest" in whiskey it might help if you had some practical knowledge to go with it, which you obviously lack. Feel free to pontificate about Scotch all you like, but don't tell me "bourbon is Scotch" or lecture me about Irish Whiskey because you're completely out of your element. Damned funny though.
 

GVF

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This sound familiar?



Then you went on to further claim that the two are "very comparable" and "quite similar" even though they aren't. Now you're telling me that bourbon is scotch.



The Scot in me is having a good laugh at you, the Irish in me is saying you don't know what the hell you're talking about. You even think they should call Irish Whiskey "Scotch" because ... you know, its the same thing. LOL



Regardless of your "historical interest" in whiskey it might help if you had some practical knowledge to go with it, which you obviously lack. Feel free to pontificate about Scotch all you like, but don't tell me "bourbon is Scotch" or lecture me about Irish Whiskey because you're completely out of your element. Damned funny though.
You left out these:

Maybe it's my ancestry, and I'm no Scotch expert by any means,

I'm not calling it scotch. I'm saying they are quite similar whiskys, and are differentiated more so by where they are legally made, than by the whisky itself. I drink both, and I did say for me I find little difference in the two.

And a brief origin of bourbon:
In the state of Kentucky, Bourbon County was named after the French royal family to honor them for their help during the American Revolution. In the early 1700 and 1800, the Scottish, Irish, and other European settlers that had settled in Kentucky started distilling whiskey. It is believed that they came with distilling knowledge
So... they would have began by brewing their Scotch/Irish recipes which evolved into Bourbon with hte abundance of corn, which is now a requirement in the recipe.

And from whiskey.com:
After the English settlers, it was mainly the Scots and Irish who did not want to do without the Whisk(e)y they were used to from their old home in their new homeland ... The barley required for fermentation grew very sparsely on the soils and did not bring good harvests. Corn had already been cultivated to a great extent by Native Americans and therefore promised better results. Very soon people found that corn could be easily mixed with barley, rye and wheat. There was no peat to fuel the fires for drying malted barley. But there were enough forests to cover the demand for heating. Unfortunately one had to do without the peaty taste in the Whisky. American Whiskey makers tried to compensate for the lack of peat by the addition of hops, the use of rye and the charring of casks. And in the un-spoilt wilderness of the new continent they found plenty of clean water which was iron-free and low in minerals.

Bourbon most certainly evolved from Scotch and todays methods of making Bourbon came from the Scots attempt to get their peaty taste from Rye, hops, and charred barrels. You seem to think highly of yourself for not knowing some basic reading. Damn funny though.
 

HoptownVol

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You left out these:

Maybe it's my ancestry, and I'm no Scotch expert by any means,

I'm not calling it scotch. I'm saying they are quite similar whiskys, and are differentiated more so by where they are legally made, than by the whisky itself. I drink both, and I did say for me I find little difference in the two.

And a brief origin of bourbon:
In the state of Kentucky, Bourbon County was named after the French royal family to honor them for their help during the American Revolution. In the early 1700 and 1800, the Scottish, Irish, and other European settlers that had settled in Kentucky started distilling whiskey. It is believed that they came with distilling knowledge
So... they would have began by brewing their Scotch/Irish recipes which evolved into Bourbon with hte abundance of corn, which is now a requirement in the recipe.

And from whiskey.com:
After the English settlers, it was mainly the Scots and Irish who did not want to do without the Whisk(e)y they were used to from their old home in their new homeland ... The barley required for fermentation grew very sparsely on the soils and did not bring good harvests. Corn had already been cultivated to a great extent by Native Americans and therefore promised better results. Very soon people found that corn could be easily mixed with barley, rye and wheat. There was no peat to fuel the fires for drying malted barley. But there were enough forests to cover the demand for heating. Unfortunately one had to do without the peaty taste in the Whisky. American Whiskey makers tried to compensate for the lack of peat by the addition of hops, the use of rye and the charring of casks. And in the un-spoilt wilderness of the new continent they found plenty of clean water which was iron-free and low in minerals.

Bourbon most certainly evolved from Scotch and todays methods of making Bourbon came from the Scots attempt to get their peaty taste from Rye, hops, and charred barrels. You seem to think highly of yourself for not knowing some basic reading. Damn funny though.
Just stop, I'm done reading this nonsense.
 

GVF

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Just stop, I'm done reading this nonsense.
That's because you got busted and don't know what you think you know. And you dang sure don't know how to accept that my tastes in whisky says I find Scotch and Irish to be similar TO ME, barring the peaty ones. Has nothing to do with the legalities.

And since you jumped my pony from the get go and started your run, throw some historical facts out about where Bourbon came from that disputes the Historical facts I just provided you. Bourbon began as a modified Scotch bill, from the Scots, that settled the Bourbon region in an attempt to imitate the peat they no longer had. Period. Happy reading.

BTW, there's another THEORY that bourbon came from the French ( by two men that settled in Louisville and shipped it down river) to satisfy the French in New Orleans and got it's name from "the whisky sold on Bourbon Street." This version, though not provable, suggests bourbon was distilled and aged in charred casks to favor cognac and satisfy the Cognac taste buds of the French residents in lieu of the expensive cognac.

But, in the end, it's all just the reading of historical accounts. Comes in handy if one is interested in their interests.

And don't forget...Tennessee Whiskey's ONLY MAJOR differentiation from Bourbon legally is the required Maple Charcoal Filtering. Minimum mash bill requirements are equal. Casks, and aging and ABV are very close. Beyond the 51% corn and basic legal obligations is where you will only find differences among the master distillers.
 
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