When Will Bama End the Racist Confederate Yellowhammer Cheer?

#1

VolunteerHillbilly

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#1
Looks like UGA and UF woke'd up before the SEC school that actually does use an homage to Confederate soldiers.

Alabama State Archives

The common flicker is the State Bird of Alabama. Alabama has been known as the "Yellowhammer State" since the Civil War. The yellowhammer nickname was applied to the Confederate soldiers from Alabama when a company of young cavalry soldiers from Huntsville, under the command of Rev. D.C. Kelly, arrived at Hopkinsville, KY, where Gen. Forrest's troops were stationed. The officers and men of the Huntsville company wore fine, new uniforms, whereas the soldiers who had long been on the battlefields were dressed in faded, worn uniforms. On the sleeves, collars and coattails of the new calvary troop were bits of brilliant yellow cloth. As the company rode past Company A , Will Arnett cried out in greeting "Yellowhammer, Yellowhammer, flicker, flicker!" The greeting brought a roar of laughter from the men and from that moment the Huntsville soldiers were spoken of as the "yellowhammer company." The term quickly spread throughout the Confederate Army and all Alabama troops were referred to unofficially as the "Yellowhammers."



When the Confederate Veterans in Alabama were organized they took pride in being referred to as the "Yellowhammers" and wore a yellowhammer feather in their caps or lapels during reunions.

A bill introduced in the 1927 legislature by Representative Thomas E. Martin, Montgomery County, was passed and approved by Governor Bibb Graves on September 6, 1927.
 
#6

bamawriter

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#6
Mississippi Black Bears...of all the nerve.

Why can't it just be the Mississippi Bears?

Embrace all the bears
Leave it to Ole Miss to get rid of Col. Reb for being racially insensitive and then replace him with a bear that is defined by the color of his fur and not the content of his character.
 
#7

Jax_Vol

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#7
Leave it to Ole Miss to get rid of Col. Reb for being racially insensitive and then replace him with a bear that is defined by the color of his fur and not the content of his character.
Now, I'm hearing that the bear missed a couple of games, so Kiffin fired him and hired a Great White Shark.

Worse mascot choice ever...

Col Reb is crying
 
#8

VOLnVANDYland

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#8
Take away Sweet Home Alabama too! Pays homage of George Wallace....
While we re at it vacate their bogus natty claims too, just for good measure... cause I’m sure it’s somehow racist in some way
 
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#14

bamawriter

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#14
Well he co wrote the song, so I think what he said candidly about it is revealing, whether Van Zant wanted to admit it or not. You didn’t answer my other question.
The Confederate flag discussion has been beaten to death. The school's history is what it is. I'm only 37 years old and I didn't attend the U of A, so none of it's an issue for me.
 
#16

05_never_again

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#16
The Confederate flag discussion has been beaten to death. The school's history is what it is. I'm only 37 years old and I didn't attend the U of A, so none of it's an issue for me.
@VOLnVANDYland
The message of Sweet Home Alabama is somewhat nuanced, which of course means it's going to be critiqued by people. People really don't like nuance or anything that makes them feel ambivalent, especially in today's political and media environment.

Ronnie Van Zant was quoted as saying "We thought Neil was shooting all the ducks in order to kill one or two." Basically saying we don't agree with racism and segregation either, but don't put down the whole South because of it. They saw "Southern Man" and "Alabama" as snobbish, "we're better than you" critiques of the South that were too sweeping and generalized, and Young himself said this about it later: "My own song 'Alabama' richly deserved the shot Lynyrd Skynyrd gave me with their great record. I don't like my words when I listen to it. They are accusatory and condescending, not fully thought out, and too easy to misconstrue." He basically agreed with Sweet Home Alabama's critique of him.
 
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#17

VOLnVANDYland

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#17
@VOLnVANDYland
The message of Sweet Home Alabama is somewhat nuanced, which of course means it's going to be critiqued by people. People really don't like nuance or anything that makes them feel ambivalent, especially in today's political and media environment.

Ronnie Van Zant was quoted as saying "We thought Neil was shooting all the ducks in order to kill one or two." Basically saying we don't agree with racism and segregation either, but don't put down the whole South because of it. They saw "Southern Man" and "Alabama" as snobbish, "we're better than you" critiques of the South that were too sweeping and generalized, and Young himself said this about it later: "My own song 'Alabama' richly deserved the shot Lynyrd Skynyrd gave me with their great record. I don't like my words when I listen to it. They are accusatory and condescending, not fully thought out, and too easy to misconstrue." He basically agreed with Sweet Home Alabama's critique of him.
Cool story. Nuanced means there are uncomfortable themes as well. And, like I said the co-writer of the song made some troubling comments on the meaning in regards to George Wallace. Also there is the groups history of embracing the confederate battle flag. Bammers better get their defensive game plan fired up if they want to keep that song at sporting events, because there will be people coming for it
 
#18

05_never_again

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#18
Cool story. Nuanced means there are uncomfortable themes as well. And, like I said the co-writer of the song made some troubling comments on the meaning in regards to George Wallace. Also there is the groups history of embracing the confederate battle flag. Bammers better get their defensive game plan fired up if they want to keep that song at sporting events, because there will be people coming for it
Don't disagree with any of that. It sounds possible King might have been kind of out on his own with that interpretation (given the rest of the band members said something different, and Neil Young himself essentially said 'point taken' in response to the song). But the fact that he said what he said does make it a target, no doubt. The mob is doing stuff like that at this point to assert their dominance.

If they do go after the song, I'd expect it to be from a more simplistic viewpoint. They'll say something like slaves used to toil in Alabama, and there is a long history of segregation there, so the state shouldn't be referred to as a "sweet home."
 
#19

tnutater

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#19
Yellow Hammer Rammer Jammer is the most offensive unsportsman like cheer in football. Totally classless, as one would expect from Bama.

That has nothing to do with it being racist.

I doubt anything will ever be done about it though, Bammers think it is cool.

And just so everyone is clear: I hope Alabama never wins another game.
 
#24

wmcovol

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#24
Yellow Hammer Rammer Jammer is the most offensive unsportsman like cheer in football. Totally classless, as one would expect from Bama.

That has nothing to do with it being racist.

I doubt anything will ever be done about it though, Bammers think it is cool.

And just so everyone is clear: I hope Alabama never wins another game.
It’s totally classless but the SEC office loves it Cause it’s Bama. I expect the SEC office to plead with UF to reinstate the Gator Chomp, which is much better than Bama YH cheer
 
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