Tyler Summit Today ....

#1

xtpsrh08123

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Messages
968
Likes
1,528
#1
USA TODAY


“I regret my actions and decisions, and I hate that I hurt so many people,’’ he said. “But I love Brooke. I love Breck. We love our lives."
“I don’t see coaching as a career. I used to. It used to be all I wanted to do, was to be a coach for as long as I could. Not anymore."
Great read :)
 
Last edited:
#7

BowlBrother85

1 star recruit
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
27,461
Likes
26,430
#7
I felt bad for AnDe Ragsdale at the time. Her husband's infidelity became a public spectacle and it appears that the entire Louisiana Tech women's basketball team knew what was going on before she did. That had to be very embarrassing and hurtful. I know she has also remarried. Some of these well-wishes should be reserved for her. That article doesn't mention a current job for Tyler (at age 30). He has a cushy life thanks to his mom's pension. He will be fine whether he gets a second chance in coaching or not.
 
#8

Voltopia

Aight, aight, aight.
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
2,526
Likes
4,975
#8
I recall the bygone days when practically every other "next coach" comment on the SUmmiTT was hot to trot for Tyler taking over after Pat retired, and later on after Holly retired. It was grating. Incessant. One might also say irrational. Some small part of me was relieved that the scandal settled that issue - not that I would ever wish tragedy on someone for a petty reason (or any reason really) but good grief the Tyler talk got old after a while. A larger part of me was sad to see that little boy who grew up alongside Tennessee fans fall off the boat; it can happen to anyone in any circumstance, but it's still a shame. And the largest part of me was at least somewhat grateful Pat didn't see it happen. She was such a champion, I would hate to have seen the media frenzy around her and her legacy if she'd been cognizant. It would have been significant.

If everyone's moved on and found peace, good for them. That's all that can be hoped for in such a situation.
 
#9

Hallie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2021
Messages
414
Likes
433
#9
Glad he has moved past this ..if thats the worst thing he does in life ... he has felt remorse and ask for forgiveness .. glad he is happy and cherishes his family .. although mistakes made and he has been born with a silver spoon in his mouth .. all that matters is he is forgiven and be a outstanding husband and father from here on ... good to hear that he is working past coaching.
 
#10

tennrich1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Messages
4,728
Likes
4,289
#10
I had a conversation this morning with a friend simply about choices we make in our lives and how devastating they can be. I once heard this saying about choices: We are free to choose....we are NOT free not to choose. And once we make our choices - we are NOT free to choose the consequences of our choice! I know that’s heavy but basically says we MUST ALL make decisions all day ...every day. And even when we decide not to choose- that is our choice and is almost always the wrong choice. I’m sure Tyler understands that more than most.
 
#13

GrayWaterCanine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2020
Messages
240
Likes
298
#13
I recall the bygone days when practically every other "next coach" comment on the SUmmiTT was hot to trot for Tyler taking over after Pat retired, and later on after Holly retired. It was grating. Incessant. One might also say irrational. Some small part of me was relieved that the scandal settled that issue - not that I would ever wish tragedy on someone for a petty reason (or any reason really) but good grief the Tyler talk got old after a while. A larger part of me was sad to see that little boy who grew up alongside Tennessee fans fall off the boat; it can happen to anyone in any circumstance, but it's still a shame. And the largest part of me was at least somewhat grateful Pat didn't see it happen. She was such a champion, I would hate to have seen the media frenzy around her and her legacy if she'd been cognizant. It would have been significant.

If everyone's moved on and found peace, good for them. That's all that can be hoped for in such a situation.
Looking back on all of this, I think "we" shoulder some blame for Tyler's situation. "We" is the Tennessee fans and some women's college basketball fans in general. He was put in a place that was very difficult for a young man his age. I believe completely in self-responsibility, but I think we have to be realistic in the fact that he had it difficult in some ways. He could never have lived up to those lofty expectations, and he was set on a journey at such a young age without his Mom to guide him for much of it.
 
#14

GrayWaterCanine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2020
Messages
240
Likes
298
#14
I felt bad for AnDe Ragsdale at the time. Her husband's infidelity became a public spectacle and it appears that the entire Louisiana Tech women's basketball team knew what was going on before she did. That had to be very embarrassing and hurtful. I know she has also remarried. Some of these well-wishes should be reserved for her. That article doesn't mention a current job for Tyler (at age 30). He has a cushy life thanks to his mom's pension. He will be fine whether he gets a second chance in coaching or not.
It's really none of our business, but I just can't help but wonder if there wasn't a lot more going on than we will ever understand. Also, I find it sad that a young man like him is not contributing something. It sounds as if he is just living off his mom's pension. I would think he has something valuable to offer, even if it isn't coaching. If that's the foundation, it's great, but he sort of downplays that as far as a career or significant activity in his life.
 
#15

MsSportsGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2015
Messages
134
Likes
236
#15
I got blasted for this a few years ago but....

I felt Tyler Summitt acknowledged he made a terrible mistake, lost his job and his then wife, embarrassed the legacy of his family and likely ruined any shot he had of coaching. The term I used was "grace" which probably wasn't the best choice of words but my view was he had suffered the appropriate consequences and there was no reason for internet fans to continue to pile on the shame and guilt. I was unsure exactly what else people thought should happen beyond what did and grace isn't forgetting but rather not using the mistakes as a weapon against him indefinitely.

There is no doubt he feels guilt some days. With his mother's pension as well as other assets she accumulated he will not have to worry tremendously about finances if he takes care of them. It's sad that the young boy who was by his mother's side for the championships grew up to be a flawed human but it happened.

There were several families destroyed over this and I don't see much to be gained from the interview beyond having some curiosity satisfied. Honestly he just needs to live his life in peace with his wife and son and it is probably best he stay out of the spotlight.
 
#16

volman128

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
1,322
Likes
2,057
#16
Looking back on all of this, I think "we" shoulder some blame for Tyler's situation. "We" is the Tennessee fans and some women's college basketball fans in general. He was put in a place that was very difficult for a young man his age. I believe completely in self-responsibility, but I think we have to be realistic in the fact that he had it difficult in some ways. He could never have lived up to those lofty expectations, and he was set on a journey at such a young age without his Mom to guide him for much of it.
I think he deserves some grace re the affair because he's a human being, and also dealing with the basically terminal diagnosis of his mother at the time, and TBH that's between him and his ex-spouse. But this thing about making a martyr out of children of famous people? Nah. I've never bought that and I don't with him. He had the best of everything growing up, grew up in immense wealth and privilege, went to private school (Webb) and got an assistant coaching job and a head coaching job because of nepotism -- he wasn't remotely qualified for either job and wouldn't have gotten either job (D1 assistant job right out of college and then a couple years later a HC job) had he not been the child of Pat Summitt. Pat basically admitted all this in her last book. There is pressure to live up to expectations but most people have expectations placed upon them as young adults and 99% of them don't have the privilege he had. Tyler is a white straight man who was born into wealth. This country is literally tailored to him. You could possibly make a point if he wound up being a lousy coach that he wasn't cut out to be a coach and went into it because he was expected to, but that's a separate discussion from not only sleeping around on your wife, but compounding that by doing it with one of your players, which is a major violation of ethics and character. We should stop making excuses for stuff like that, because there is no excuse for what he did and acting like growing up a spoiled rich kid came with pressure for him to do it is utterly laughable.
 
#17

GrayWaterCanine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2020
Messages
240
Likes
298
#17
I think he deserves some grace re the affair because he's a human being, and also dealing with the basically terminal diagnosis of his mother at the time, and TBH that's between him and his ex-spouse. But this thing about making a martyr out of children of famous people? Nah. I've never bought that and I don't with him. He had the best of everything growing up, grew up in immense wealth and privilege, went to private school (Webb) and got an assistant coaching job and a head coaching job because of nepotism -- he wasn't remotely qualified for either job and wouldn't have gotten either job (D1 assistant job right out of college and then a couple years later a HC job) had he not been the child of Pat Summitt. Pat basically admitted all this in her last book. There is pressure to live up to expectations but most people have expectations placed upon them as young adults and 99% of them don't have the privilege he had. Tyler is a white straight man who was born into wealth. This country is literally tailored to him. You could possibly make a point if he wound up being a lousy coach that he wasn't cut out to be a coach and went into it because he was expected to, but that's a separate discussion from not only sleeping around on your wife, but compounding that by doing it with one of your players, which is a major violation of ethics and character. We should stop making excuses for stuff like that, because there is no excuse for what he did and acting like growing up a spoiled rich kid came with pressure for him to do it is utterly laughable.
The point you are making regarding nepotism is exactly what I was talking about, and nepotism requires involvement by multiple parties. You seem to be placing the nepotism solely on Tyler. I believe other parties shoulder a tremendous amount of blame for that nepotism. That is the crux of any outside responsibility. You are very right about the rest of it. That was all personal and moral failing for which you would have hoped he'd be prepared. That nepotism created the absolute wrong environment for him, though.
 
#18

MsSportsGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2015
Messages
134
Likes
236
#18
I think he deserves some grace re the affair because he's a human being, and also dealing with the basically terminal diagnosis of his mother at the time, and TBH that's between him and his ex-spouse. But this thing about making a martyr out of children of famous people? Nah. I've never bought that and I don't with him. He had the best of everything growing up, grew up in immense wealth and privilege, went to private school (Webb) and got an assistant coaching job and a head coaching job because of nepotism -- he wasn't remotely qualified for either job and wouldn't have gotten either job (D1 assistant job right out of college and then a couple years later a HC job) had he not been the child of Pat Summitt. Pat basically admitted all this in her last book. There is pressure to live up to expectations but most people have expectations placed upon them as young adults and 99% of them don't have the privilege he had. Tyler is a white straight man who was born into wealth. This country is literally tailored to him. You could possibly make a point if he wound up being a lousy coach that he wasn't cut out to be a coach and went into it because he was expected to, but that's a separate discussion from not only sleeping around on your wife, but compounding that by doing it with one of your players, which is a major violation of ethics and character. We should stop making excuses for stuff like that, because there is no excuse for what he did and acting like growing up a spoiled rich kid came with pressure for him to do it is utterly laughable.
I tend to agree with most of your statement. Nepotism exists in all industries and it is especially rampant in coaching. Tyler was not the first and there have been plenty since who have jobs because of who they are the child of. I think the system did fail him to the extent wise counsel did not properly warn him that 23 is far too young to be in charge of a D1 basketball program. When Pat did it the world was different. No one should be put in that position today and the pressure was enormous. That's no reason to do what he did but having a big name does come with expectations many are unable to meet.

Privilege doesn't make a person's life problem free. His likely challenges weren't what most would experience but it doesn't mean he had no problems. I don't think most are trying to make a martyr out of him and it sounds like from this interview he knows what he did and is continuing to move forward.We will never know if he was cut out to be a coach or not because the career didn't really have time to get started. I don't think he will ever coach, at least not women, but my thought is he can likely be a solid contributor to society in plenty of ways.
 
#19

Remy

A kick to the cods is my only deterrence.
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
9,190
Likes
9,567
#19
If you took everyone coaching Women's Basketball at the collegiate level, even moreso, took everyone who goes to work as you do every day of your life and put them under a microscope and then published and broadcast any moral failing they may have had along the way more than likely many of us would be all by ourselves. Tyler was a young man who dove into the highly charged atmosphere of competitive women's basketball with all that estrogen and attractive young women around and him in his twenties I'm surprised his failings were not much worse and numerable. He probably should not be around young women coaching ever again but he surely ought find a way to contribute based on his education and experiences to teach high school or coach another sport perhaps guys in baseball or something. I hate seeing someone so beaten down that they can't come back up to walk upright again, the article made it seem like he's just a beaten down old dog at this point and he' s still a young man.
 
#20

lvocd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2015
Messages
2,922
Likes
7,804
#20
What happened to Tyler -- the poor judgement under crisis -- is common among people who are grieving intensely. That Tyler, at his young age, was having to deal with the sudden decline of the person who literally personified strength to him (and to millions of strangers) at the very same time he was put in the pressure cooker of being the youngest D1 coach in the country, was too much to bear. Most people would be shocked to know how many extra-marital affairs happen when one partner is overcome with grief of some kind, or the pressure of being a new father, or new job, etc. Can any of us truly understand what it must have been like for the only child of one of the most respected human beings on the planet is suddenly preparing for that person to die a horrific death at a young age? I can't. But I can understand the impulse to do something totally out of character and dangerous as a way to gain some measure of control in a situation that seems totally out-of-control.

A very young man made an all-too-common mistake at a time in his life when he was most vulnerable and overwhelmed and preparing for his Rock, his Compass, his dear mother, to die. If there are people alive who still can't find it in their hearts to forgive him, then they need serious help.
 
#22

Remy

A kick to the cods is my only deterrence.
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
9,190
Likes
9,567
#22
I think Pat would want her only child and only grandchild to be happy.
she would have hated what Tyler did but she would have never stopped loving her only child whom she adored since the very first moment she saw him And who gave her so many years full of joy.
ain't nobody loves your kids like you do. When Ted Bundy was executed his mother was there to grieve. Most mothers and family members love us no matter come what may, I have to think Pat would be that way for Tyler.
 
#23

Vfl2407

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2015
Messages
7,548
Likes
11,585
#23
If you took everyone coaching Women's Basketball at the collegiate level, even moreso, took everyone who goes to work as you do every day of your life and put them under a microscope and then published and broadcast any moral failing they may have had along the way more than likely many of us would be all by ourselves. Tyler was a young man who dove into the highly charged atmosphere of competitive women's basketball with all that estrogen and attractive young women around and him in his twenties I'm surprised his failings were not much worse and numerable. He probably should not be around young women coaching ever again but he surely ought find a way to contribute based on his education and experiences to teach high school or coach another sport perhaps guys in baseball or something. I hate seeing someone so beaten down that they can't come back up to walk upright again, the article made it seem like he's just a beaten down old dog at this point and he' s still a young man.
I don’t know what his relationship with his father is. But I hope that R.B. has been there with him through this and that he is a great grandfather to Tyler’s child.
All LV fans watched a cute little boy grow up before our eyes beaming at his Mother and all of her players. I want to think that sweet little guy is still in there somewhere.
I hope that Tyler has apologized to his ex wife and ex bball players and I hope that Tyler finds some joy. He absolutely idolized his Mother and none of us can fully know how painful it was for him to watch her condition deteriorate right before his very eyes. Pat would want us to forgive him. I do.
 
#24

chas

Active Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2019
Messages
36
Likes
57
#24
we are all humans and make bad choices at time please everyone give him the second chance he deserives. if it was you. you would want a second chance . god bless Tyler and please make the most of it we all still rembember you mom and god bless her and rest in peace Pat.
 
Likes: stlvolsfan
#25

BowlBrother85

1 star recruit
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
27,461
Likes
26,430
#25
What happened to Tyler -- the poor judgement under crisis -- is common among people who are grieving intensely. That Tyler, at his young age, was having to deal with the sudden decline of the person who literally personified strength to him (and to millions of strangers) at the very same time he was put in the pressure cooker of being the youngest D1 coach in the country, was too much to bear. Most people would be shocked to know how many extra-marital affairs happen when one partner is overcome with grief of some kind, or the pressure of being a new father, or new job, etc. Can any of us truly understand what it must have been like for the only child of one of the most respected human beings on the planet is suddenly preparing for that person to die a horrific death at a young age? I can't. But I can understand the impulse to do something totally out of character and dangerous as a way to gain some measure of control in a situation that seems totally out-of-control.

A very young man made an all-too-common mistake at a time in his life when he was most vulnerable and overwhelmed and preparing for his Rock, his Compass, his dear mother, to die. If there are people alive who still can't find it in their hearts to forgive him, then they need serious help.
That's over the top. The only people he owed an apology, were AnDe Ragsdale and Mickie DeMoss... and it's totally understandable if they don't forgive him. I mention Mickie because she really stuck her neck out for him and he made her look like a fool. Louisiana Tech initially offered her their head coaching job in 2014, and she turned it down, but said that she would be willing to serve as an assistant to Tyler Summitt if they would give him the opportunity (which he hadn't yet earned on his own). As a Louisiana Tech alum, and long time friend of Pat Summitt's, she really went to bat for him with the administration and insisted that he was ready for such a responsibility at such a young age. Tyler took that big break and crapped all over it... and made one of his mother's best friends out to be an idiot in front of her alma mater. Having said that... I'm sure Mickie has forgiven him.
 
Last edited:

VN Store


Sponsors
 

Top