Think the Baseball Vols will be ranked tomorrow?

#8

Volsbaseballfan

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#8
I could care less until the last poll. We don’t need these young men to let up and think they are good. Keep grinding. Polls never won a ball game ! Go Vols. Hammer down. Keep playing defense and filling the mitt up . Let the chips fall where they may!!!
 
#9

Volsbaseballfan1

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#9
I could care less until the last poll. We don’t need these young men to let up and think they are good. Keep grinding. Polls never won a ball game ! Go Vols. Hammer down. Keep playing defense and filling the mitt up . Let the chips fall where they may!!!
RPI means the most and they are sitting at 14. Very early and things can change daily but still a really good start.
 
#11

OldTimer

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#11
I could care less until the last poll. We don’t need these young men to let up and think they are good. Keep grinding. Polls never won a ball game ! Go Vols. Hammer down. Keep playing defense and filling the mitt up . Let the chips fall where they may!!!
very true and I agree whole heartedly however it's nice for the guys to receive some recognition for the work they've put in....just adds a little more swagger to the step.
 
#12

OldTimer

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#12
I’ve never had a good grasp on rpi. What’s a good, average and bad rpi?
more than you care to know, in baseball you need below a 45 or so to get an NCAA Bid and that's not guaranteed.....

from WIKI.......

The rating percentage index, commonly known as the RPI, is a quantity used to rank sports teams based upon a team's wins and losses and its strength of schedule. It is one of the sports rating systems by which NCAA basketball, baseball, softball, hockey, soccer, lacrosse, and volleyball teams are ranked. This system was in use in Division I men's college basketball from 1981 through 2018 to aid in the selecting and seeding of teams appearing in the men's playoffs (see March Madness),[1] and has been used in the women's tournament since its inception in 1982.
During the 2018 offseason, the NCAA announced that the RPI would no longer be used in the selection process for the Division I men's basketball tournament. Effective immediately, it was replaced with the NCAA Evaluation Tool (NET). This new metric will initially be used only by the Division I men's selection committee—the Division I women's basketball committee, plus all other NCAA selection committees, continue to use their own versions of the RPI.[2][3]
In its current formulation, the index comprises a team's winning percentage (25%), its opponents' winning percentage (50%), and the winning percentage of those opponents' opponents (25%). The opponents' winning percentage and the winning percentage of those opponents' opponents both comprise the strength of schedule (SOS). Thus, the SOS accounts for 75% of the RPI calculation and is 2/3 its opponents' winning percentage and 1/3 its opponents' opponents' winning percentages.
The RPI lacks theoretical justification from a statistical standpoint. Other ranking systems which include the margin of victory of games played or other statistics in addition to the win/loss results have been shown to be a better predictor of the outcomes of future games. However, because the margin of victory has been manipulated in the past by teams or individuals in the context of gambling, the RPI can be used to mitigate motivation for such manipulation.
Some feel that the heavy emphasis upon strength of schedule gives an unfair advantage to teams from major conferences. Teams from "majors" are allowed to pick many of their non-conference opponents (often blatantly weaker teams). Teams from minor conferences, however, may only get one or two such opponents in their schedules. Also, some mid-major conferences regularly compel their member teams to schedule opponents ranked in the top half of the RPI, which could boost the strength of that conference and/or its tougher-scheduling teams. In basketball, the Missouri Valley Conference has successfully done this: It has become one of the top-rated RPI conferences, despite having very few of its teams ranked in the two national Top 25 polls.[4] In 2006, the NCAA began to release its RPI calculations weekly starting in January. Independent sources, such as ESPN or CNN/SI, also publish their own RPI calculations, which are updated more frequently.
 
#13

txbo

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#13
more than you care to know, in baseball you need below a 45 or so to get an NCAA Bid and that's not guaranteed.....

from WIKI.......

The rating percentage index, commonly known as the RPI, is a quantity used to rank sports teams based upon a team's wins and losses and its strength of schedule. It is one of the sports rating systems by which NCAA basketball, baseball, softball, hockey, soccer, lacrosse, and volleyball teams are ranked. This system was in use in Division I men's college basketball from 1981 through 2018 to aid in the selecting and seeding of teams appearing in the men's playoffs (see March Madness),[1] and has been used in the women's tournament since its inception in 1982.
During the 2018 offseason, the NCAA announced that the RPI would no longer be used in the selection process for the Division I men's basketball tournament. Effective immediately, it was replaced with the NCAA Evaluation Tool (NET). This new metric will initially be used only by the Division I men's selection committee—the Division I women's basketball committee, plus all other NCAA selection committees, continue to use their own versions of the RPI.[2][3]
In its current formulation, the index comprises a team's winning percentage (25%), its opponents' winning percentage (50%), and the winning percentage of those opponents' opponents (25%). The opponents' winning percentage and the winning percentage of those opponents' opponents both comprise the strength of schedule (SOS). Thus, the SOS accounts for 75% of the RPI calculation and is 2/3 its opponents' winning percentage and 1/3 its opponents' opponents' winning percentages.
The RPI lacks theoretical justification from a statistical standpoint. Other ranking systems which include the margin of victory of games played or other statistics in addition to the win/loss results have been shown to be a better predictor of the outcomes of future games. However, because the margin of victory has been manipulated in the past by teams or individuals in the context of gambling, the RPI can be used to mitigate motivation for such manipulation.
Some feel that the heavy emphasis upon strength of schedule gives an unfair advantage to teams from major conferences. Teams from "majors" are allowed to pick many of their non-conference opponents (often blatantly weaker teams). Teams from minor conferences, however, may only get one or two such opponents in their schedules. Also, some mid-major conferences regularly compel their member teams to schedule opponents ranked in the top half of the RPI, which could boost the strength of that conference and/or its tougher-scheduling teams. In basketball, the Missouri Valley Conference has successfully done this: It has become one of the top-rated RPI conferences, despite having very few of its teams ranked in the two national Top 25 polls.[4] In 2006, the NCAA began to release its RPI calculations weekly starting in January. Independent sources, such as ESPN or CNN/SI, also publish their own RPI calculations, which are updated more frequently.
Thanks a million OT.
 
#18

Volsbaseballfan1

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#18
Will not be rated this week. Schedule too soft. We will know a bit more about us after Liberty game. Liberty is pretty solid team.
Indiana is better then Liberty. Liberty is a good team but let’s not cut short what the Vols did this weekend. Indiana is a perennial regional team and returned a lot.
 

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