The reason NIL deals are important and are good for the game

#54

ptcarter

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#54
LeBron James didn't go to college. He's lost more money than I ever had. I wouldn't swap places with him. I think the right education (and there are some worthless degrees out there) does open a persons eyes up into the way the world works. It has value.

"The richest man in the room is not the man who has the most, it's the man who needs the least".
 
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#55

VOLtaism

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#55
How? Players were getting paid before. Now it's simply out in the open and other schools know what the actual amounts are that they are competing against.
Yes, but the under the table aspect kept things reasonable. Now in 1 season we have gone from getting paid for likeness to multi-million dollar deals before they show up on campus. Since football is so competitive it will not stop there. They are already thinking about starting them out in high school. Pandora's box has been opened and nothing can stop college footballs self-destruction.
 
#56

Probably_in_Class

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#56
Yes, but the under the table aspect kept things reasonable. Now in 1 season we have gone from getting paid for likeness to multi-million dollar deals before they show up on campus. Since football is so competitive it will not stop there. They are already thinking about starting them out in high school. Pandora's box has been opened and nothing can stop college footballs self-destruction.
I love college football as much as anyone, but it was built on a horrible business model (free labor). If football can't survive without the players seeing some of the money, then destruction is what it deserves.
 
#58

Probably_in_Class

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#58
I mean kind of, but that really isn't the point. There's no way NIL would have landed him anywhere near as much money as a first round contract. With NIL in place, he'd be slightly richer (maybe, depends on what he was getting under the table), but it wouldn't have made much of a difference. He was still drafted and still became a millionaire. The reason it's important is this:

Mike Honcho Shirsey- Pre-Order

and this:

Zakai

and like 50 others I could link. The University is generating a ton of interest and a ton of money due to these players having success. They deserve to share in that success, and NIL makes that possible for players who are unlikely to see million dollar paydays in their future. For most college athletes, the height of their fame will be in college. It's about time they get to capitalize on that small window.
 
#59

Carp

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#59
Yes, but the under the table aspect kept things reasonable. Now in 1 season we have gone from getting paid for likeness to multi-million dollar deals before they show up on campus. Since football is so competitive it will not stop there. They are already thinking about starting them out in high school. Pandora's box has been opened and nothing can stop college footballs self-destruction.

We don't actually know what they made under the table though.
 
#60

VOLtaism

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#60
I love college football as much as anyone, but it was built on a horrible business model (free labor). If football can't survive without the players seeing some of the money, then destruction is what it deserves.
It was not free labor, a 4 year scholarship including room and board is a big deal. Then they have the chance to get the attention of the NFL catapulting them to millionaire status. The school provided a free launching pad. The problem started when TV money started growing and the schools started competing for coaches due to the need to win. No coach is worth 7 million to do what he would be doing anyway for $250K, but services can be auctioned to the highest bidder. Once those salaries started to climb it became a bad business model. How can you support paying a coach millions but not the players? Now they are both being over-paid and greed will destroy it.
 
#61

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#61
I'm glad that NIL appears to be a windfall for UT. It has the power to cut years of pain out between what we've experienced the last few years and where Bama has been during the same period.

Overall though, it isn't good for the game. It is important to have programs that are competitive enough to show up... like Vandy, UK, Arkansas, Mizzou, Northwestern, Wake Forest, etc. When NIL is in full bloom, the best players will almost always go to programs that have the strongest NIL support. Players who are missed out of HS will quickly hit the portal for the best deal. So even if Vandy happens to find an overlooked player... they'll be gone as soon as the world knows it.

UT seems to be ahead but top tier programs from Michigan to Miami and Penn State to UCLA will model Spyre soon enough. Very quickly the disparity between the haves and have nots is going to widen significantly.

Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing the top tier of CFB becoming a separate league if NIL is going to stay as it is. There are maybe 4 or 5 ACC programs that can compete from an NIL standpoint. Maybe 8 or even 9 SEC programs. Five or 6 Big 10. One maybe 2 Big 12. Maybe 4 or 5 Pac12 teams. Take those and make a super league with a real playoff.

Otherwise, competition is about to get ugly between the top and bottom. There won't be much of a middle class- if any. There also won't be much class mobility.

In the long run, this isn't going to make the game better. It may or may not serve the players. But it is important to remember that for every Marcus Lattimore out there who would have been paid (and has a job now as a direct benefit of his playing days) there are dozens of kids with similarly devastating injuries from CFB who were never stars or starters. There are scout team guys who have a permanent scar of some type that would never command an NIL deal.
I agree. NIL is going to be what busts up the conferences. The big programs are finally going to look at the Vandy's and the Baylor's and the Stanford's and decide it is NOT in their best interest to divvy this TV money up equally with these minnows no one wants to watch and bring no eyes to the deal and lock horns with each other for the REALLY BIG money TV contracts of the future, Wrestlemania style.
 
#62

Probably_in_Class

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#62
It was not free labor, a 4 year scholarship including room and board is a big deal. Then they have the chance to get the attention of the NFL catapulting them to millionaire status. The school provided a free launching pad. The problem started when TV money started growing and the schools started competing for coaches due to the need to win. No coach is worth 7 million to do what he would be doing anyway for $250K, but services can be auctioned to the highest bidder. Once those salaries started to climb it became a bad business model. How can you support paying a coach millions but not the players? Now they are both being over-paid and greed will destroy it.
We'll just have to agree to disagree. A 4 year scholarship including room and board is not a big deal and hasn't been for a long time. It's a rounding error for any P5 athletic department, and the schools make such significant profit margins on nearly every other student that writing off the tuition and housing for a few hundred student athletes is a drop in the bucket at a 25,000 student university (or 70,000 like some schools have). As for your last statement, the SEC just signed a $3B deal with ESPN (which the players have access to $0). I don't think I'd call the players greedy for wanting to sell a few $30 tshirts...
 
#63

VOLtaism

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#63
We'll just have to agree to disagree. A 4 year scholarship including room and board is not a big deal and hasn't been for a long time. It's a rounding error for any P5 athletic department, and the schools make such significant profit margins on nearly every other student that writing off the tuition and housing for a few hundred student athletes is a drop in the bucket at a 25,000 student university (or 70,000 like some schools have). As for your last statement, the SEC just signed a $3B deal with ESPN (which the players have access to $0). I don't think I'd call the players greedy for wanting to sell a few $30 tshirts...
There is no disagreement. The players are being paid the fair market value and the price is no more college football.
 
#64

Probably_in_Class

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#64
There is no disagreement. The players are being paid the fair market value and the price is no more college football.
What are you even talking about? The vast majority of football players still aren't seeing any income and won't...

If you're saying tuition + room and board is "fair market value" well then that's just flat out wrong.
 
#65

Woodlawn VOL

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#65
That's not really relevant if your argument is that the education itself is what is valuable. They can still get the same education without a scholarship.
You obviously don’t see the good in getting a education into a particular field you may want to go into after your career. Even in power 5 most players don’t make the nfl, many more are there to get a degree that was paid for by their athletic scholarship. Get your binders off, most college players at Power 5 do not end up in the nfl. Many players get into coaching or teaching or enter a entirely different field. They couldn’t do that without a degree. The vast amount of college athletes at Bama and Georgia or anywhere else aren’t never going to play in the pro’s. They can’t afford nor want to throw away their free ride paid for by a free scholarship. GBO!
 
#66

wmcovol

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#66
I don’t see anything wrong with what he said. If a kid is getting a fat NIL deal their education isn’t going to eclipse that in earning potential gain. Most of these kids aren’t going to be engineers.
I decided long ago I can’t fix stupid. Why I tried here is beyond me.
 
#68

BigOrangeTrain

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#68
No. They aren't getting paid to play football (or whatever sport). They are getting paid because they happen play football (or some other sport). NIL is a system that is simply allowing players to get their own sponsorships, just like any other pro athlete does. While there is undoubtedly ties from sponsors to certain programs, this all stems from the popularity of a particular recruit.
What happens if the NIL deals become so massive that they rival coaching salaries? You think that’s a good idea? It’s not.
 
#69

VOLtaism

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#69
What are you even talking about? The vast majority of football players still aren't seeing any income and won't...

If you're saying tuition + room and board is "fair market value" well then that's just flat out wrong.
Read again, I said the players were now getting fair market value with NIL money. All players will be paid by the end of next season. You think they are going to play with guys making 1 million while they get nothing? Greed will affect all aspects of the game until college football is no more. Athletic directors will want more, coaches will want more, schools will want a huge piece and the cost will keep increasing. This is pro sports now.
 
#70

Carp

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#70
You obviously don’t see the good in getting a education into a particular field you may want to go into after your career. Even in power 5 most players don’t make the nfl, many more are there to get a degree that was paid for by their athletic scholarship. Get your binders off, most college players at Power 5 do not end up in the nfl. Many players get into coaching or teaching or enter a entirely different field. They couldn’t do that without a degree. The vast amount of college athletes at Bama and Georgia or anywhere else aren’t never going to play in the pro’s. They can’t afford nor want to throw away their free ride paid for by a free scholarship. GBO!
Again, nothing stopping those guys from getting the same education without a scholarship.
 
#71

Carp

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#71
What happens if the NIL deals become so massive that they rival coaching salaries? You think that’s a good idea? It’s not.
I think people are making a lot of assumptions. There aren't that many players that are making big millions of dollars. The truth is, that even boosters and sports media companies like Spyre have a limit on what they are willing to offer.
 
#72

wmcovol

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#72
I personally know a former Tennessee Titan, a starter for several yrs, qualified for the pension. He played in the sec. Today he barely makes it financially. He’s filed bankruptcy once. He got a lot of money signing initially and again after his first contract, but it eventually runs out. Today he has no education and not much else. He had some neat stories at the bar but even those are old.

Most of us don’t realize as a professional athlete, you can’t/won’t live a life most of us are comfortable with. You’ll buy a big home, you'll go on big vacations. You and your lady will drive multiple $100k+ cars. Youll eat at the finest restaurants several times a week. you’ll buy your parents a home or car(s), you may help brothers & sisters. The number of people you support will expand. Nothing tears families apart faster than money.

I know we all think $2- $3 million would set us for life. We’re smarter than everyone else. Well, It doesn’t work that easy. Between taxes and lifestyle, it gets gone fast. Pro athletes don’t live in 3,000 sq ft homes. They live a lifestyle supported by their pro athlete income. When that ends, so does their lifestyle.

Just this week I saw where David Price is selling his Nashville home. He’s at the end of his career and realizes he’s gotta unload these “assets”. Fortunately for him, he’ll do well selling in Nashville but that doesn’t work everywhere. And believe it or not, these guys have every little equity in these homes when they sell. Many are interest only loans.
 
#73

WoodsmanVol

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#73
Because that isn't how NILs work. Aaron Rodgers doesn't get paid any more money by State Farm by how many TDs he throws or MVPs he wins.
NIL and Aaron Rodgers' earnings are as different as warp drive engine and impulse drive engines. And ole Aaron does get paid for his MVP and TDs. The more he does this, the greater his attraction to his sponsors AND his team. He gets the power to renegotiate his contracts for more money. Aaron for one isn't stupid, he insists on as much as he can get from sponsors because he knows if he sneezes instead of cough, or his playing level degenerates, they can and will drop him like a red-hot iron potato.
 
#75

Carp

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#75
NIL and Aaron Rodgers' earnings are as different as warp drive engine and impulse drive engines. And ole Aaron does get paid for his MVP and TDs. The more he does this, the greater his attraction to his sponsors AND his team. He gets the power to renegotiate his contracts for more money. Aaron for one isn't stupid, he insists on as much as he can get from sponsors because he knows if he sneezes instead of cough, or his playing level degenerates, they can and will drop him like a red-hot iron potato.
NILs are just endorsement deals. So they are the same. On a smaller level obviously, but they are endorsement deals nonetheless.

Aaron, in fact, does not get paid more by his sponsors for MVPs and TDs. Aaron Rodger's ability to make from sponsorships is directly tied to how marketable he is. Now sure, him being good at football is why he gets those deals, but at this point, he has already built his brand. It won't matter if he throws for 100 tds or 100 ints next year. His endorsement deals will remain the same. That's why Peyton continues to gain/maintain endorsement deals despite being retired for 7 years.
 

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