Tennessee Vols Basketball Recruiting

Allvols1996

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I hate to break it to you, but if you think NIL is actually about local businesses using athlete profiles to promote a brand, you’re way off the mark. That is not what NIL is right now.
I don’t think it’s that. It SHOULD be. And eventually, someone is going to pull the plug on this whether it be a lawsuit or the NCAA.
 

VolGee4

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Which goes against logic. If you’re a local business and you want to market your product/brand, who do you want to pay? That’s the idea of NIL. Not collectives brokering donor money to lure recruits. In fact, I believe it’s a violation of professional rules to use 3rd parties to attract a player to a specific team.
What professional rules? I’m just curious.
 

VolGee4

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I don’t think it’s that. It SHOULD be. And eventually, someone is going to pull the plug on this whether it be a lawsuit or the NCAA.
I’m just curious as to the legal side of this argument. The NCAA may try, but I believe we are here now. I don’t believe courts are going to limit what companies want to pay athletes.
 

VolArmy74

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There are two aspects of NIL. They reason someone like Phillips gets more, he has very high NBA potential. Any kind of endorsement deal with NBA players quickly gets extremely expensive, even as rookies. Having a year of that level of player and possibly some future rights to promotional material after they reach the NBA is huge. Also a rising ship floats all boats. When Tennessee athletics are good all businesses in Knoxville especially, are prospering. The economic impact for Knoxville when the Vols are good vs when they are bad can run into 9 figures spread across Knoxville alone. When businesses are suddenly losing a collective 100 million+ dollars a year, they are motivated to spend to fix that.
 
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Triple J will become a face of this University for yrs to come after his basketball career is over if he chooses to do so in my opinion. Very well spoken, well liked, young man. Someone you would want representing your product.
JJJ is the epitome of what you want all student athletes to be. Wouldnt be surprised if eventually works in the AD after his playing career is finished or goes the Kim English route and becomes a great young coach.

All I hope is that we can continue to recruit guys with the character of JJJ to our program. Even if guys like him don’t score the most they’re truly the backbone to a great program
 

VolGee4

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For example, an NFL team can’t conspire with Nike to supplement a contract.
NFL contracts are subject to a collective bargaining agreement that is negotiated by the players association. Nike can go out and sign any player they want however.

Any rules would have to be passed by the NCAA but also within the law, as issued by the Supreme Court case.
 

GregAmsler

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I don’t think it’s that. It SHOULD be. And eventually, someone is going to pull the plug on this whether it be a lawsuit or the NCAA.
Lawsuit? Based on what? The federal Supreme Court has ruled. It was a 9-0 decision. It’s settled law.

Folks seem to think NIL is some new fad. It isn’t. It’s the result of the Supreme Court striking down the anti-trust violation that was the old system. It’s not going away. And by the way, the ruling was correct.
 
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Allvols1996

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Lawsuit? Based on what? The federal Supreme Court has ruled. It was a 9-0 decision. It’s settled law.

Folks seem to think NIL is some new fad. It isn’t. It’s the result of the Supreme Court striking down the anti-trust violation that was the old system. It’s not going away. And by the way, the ruling was correct.
So was Row v Wade. What the court ruled on was players making money on NIL image. Not schools partnering (under the table) with 3rd party groups who are little more than a front for wealthy boosters to funnel money and broker $$ to players with little to no actual marketing obligations.

I’m 100% for players making $ on their image, by earning it honestly and openly on the market.

Players showing up and getting paid for autograph sessions? Love it. Commercials, appearances, and actually having reciprocity for their work? Perfect!

I’m also cool with what we saw with ZZ when his home burned. I think that was a purely organic and free market.
 

TooLegit2Quit

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Not schools partnering (under the table) with 3rd party groups who are little more than a front for wealthy boosters to funnel money and broker $$ to players with little to no actual marketing obligations.
That is the result of state law:

New Tennessee legislation permits universities to have direct and public relationships with the collectives that pay their athletes for their name, image and likeness.

Last week, Gov. Bill Lee signed an amendment to the state law that will allow college coaches to attend NIL events, universities to fundraise for NIL collectives and NIL representatives to make presentations on campus to recruits and players.

Many Division I universities in the state — including FBS schools Tennessee, Memphis, Middle Tennessee State and Vanderbilt — must quickly adjust to capitalize on NIL opportunities to stay ahead of competitors in other states.

Alabama repealed its NIL law, so its universities are free to work directly with collectives. Florida, Kentucky and Virginia are among states trying to do the same with an amendment.

Tennessee universities can now facilitate NIL deals by working with collectives. The new law tears down most of the barriers that previously separated schools and the third-party groups that pay their players for their NIL rights within NCAA rules.
Tennessee law allows colleges to facilitate NIL payments to players
 

Vol49er

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So was Row v Wade. What the court ruled on was players making money on NIL image. Not schools partnering (under the table) with 3rd party groups who are little more than a front for wealthy boosters to funnel money and broker $$ to players with little to no actual marketing obligations.

I’m 100% for players making $ on their image, by earning it honestly and openly on the market.

Players showing up and getting paid for autograph sessions? Love it. Commercials, appearances, and actually having reciprocity for their work? Perfect!

I’m also cool with what we saw with ZZ when his home burned. I think that was a purely organic and free market.
I understand the consternation over the new system, but it’s not going away, and certainly not at the direction of SCOTUS or the legal system in general. Maybe a small chance the NCAA does something, but who’s gonna listen honestly? Congress prob wouldn’t do anything and if they did it would be struck down. Cat is out of the bag, only thing to do now is to learn to live with it
 

lastlap

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JJJ is the epitome of what you want all student athletes to be. Wouldnt be surprised if eventually works in the AD after his playing career is finished or goes the Kim English route and becomes a great young coach.

All I hope is that we can continue to recruit guys with the character of JJJ to our program. Even if guys like him don’t score the most they’re truly the backbone to a great program
100%
 

Allvols1996

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I understand the consternation over the new system, but it’s not going away, and certainly not at the direction of SCOTUS or the legal system in general. Maybe a small chance the NCAA does something, but who’s gonna listen honestly? Congress prob wouldn’t do anything and if they did it would be struck down. Cat is out of the bag, only thing to do now is to learn to live with it
If there is money involved, and it can be regulated, it will be. There’s all kinds of potential for anti trust law suits, especially considering comments by certain coaches. We’ve always had a have and have not problem, but now you can actually measure it. That gives the have nots the means to get together and do something about it.

I don’t know the guys at Spyre, but with no rules I’d be formulating deals for camps to host where I could hand pick the athletes. I can only imagine what Saban is cooking up behind the scenes while he is whining about it. Just wait until Nike makes a deal conditioned on where a player enrolls. The crap will hit the fan then.
 

MinisterofDef#92

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Which goes against logic. If you’re a local business and you want to market your product/brand, who do you want to pay? That’s the idea of NIL. Not collectives brokering donor money to lure recruits. In fact, I believe it’s a violation of professional rules to use 3rd parties to attract a player to a specific team.
Unless a lot of the NIL money simply represents what previously existed as "under the table" payments being made to recruits
 

MoCo_Vol

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So was Row v Wade. What the court ruled on was players making money on NIL image. Not schools partnering (under the table) with 3rd party groups who are little more than a front for wealthy boosters to funnel money and broker $$ to players with little to no actual marketing obligations.

I’m 100% for players making $ on their image, by earning it honestly and openly on the market.

Players showing up and getting paid for autograph sessions? Love it. Commercials, appearances, and actually having reciprocity for their work? Perfect!

I’m also cool with what we saw with ZZ when his home burned. I think that was a purely organic and free market.
I think you're missing the point or something. If the individual is 18 or older and can legally work in the US nothing in the bold you're using for argument means dick to the supreme court or federal laws.

Now if it's being done off the books then it becomes an IRS concern because of taxation.
 

VolGee4

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If there is money involved, and it can be regulated, it will be. There’s all kinds of potential for anti trust law suits, especially considering comments by certain coaches. We’ve always had a have and have not problem, but now you can actually measure it. That gives the have nots the means to get together and do something about it.

I don’t know the guys at Spyre, but with no rules I’d be formulating deals for camps to host where I could hand pick the athletes. I can only imagine what Saban is cooking up behind the scenes while he is whining about it. Just wait until Nike makes a deal conditioned on where a player enrolls. The crap will hit the fan then.
Nike has been recruiting kids to certain schools for years and years. Now, people may just know it about it publicly. That hasn't changed at all.

I don't specialize in anti-trust and don't pretend to know that area, but I'm interested in that argument in this climate. The market is wide open, not the other way around.
 
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