Tennessee Vols Basketball Recruiting

GregAmsler

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Kind of like UK for most of their mid-century success.
To be fair to Kentucky, most of the traditional bluebloods established themselves as bluebloods by being the only school that prioritized basketball in their respective conferences. Kansas was getting their brains beat in by Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. Indiana was getting their brains beat in by Michigan, Ohio State, Minnesota, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. And so on. There just weren't many programs focusing on basketball back then, so the ones who did dominated and established tradition.
 

Willy14

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No evidence for or against. Ramey was never an option. Barnes looks everywhere, as we all know. He may find a gem. He may hold the spot.
True, I guess I was just saying as of right now we aren’t associated with any more names in the class of 2022. Of course that could change as soon as tomorrow who knows
 

VegasBaby!

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To be fair to Kentucky, most of the traditional bluebloods established themselves as bluebloods by being the only school that prioritized basketball in their respective conferences. Kansas was getting their brains beat in by Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. Indiana was getting their brains beat in by Michigan, Ohio State, Minnesota, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. And so on. There just weren't many programs focusing on basketball back then, so the ones who did dominated and established tradition.
A fair amount of truth in your statement, but UCLA was an exception that was highly successful in both major sports, as well as several other sports, doing that era.
 

Stoerner Fumbles

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To be fair to Kentucky, most of the traditional bluebloods established themselves as bluebloods by being the only school that prioritized basketball in their respective conferences. Kansas was getting their brains beat in by Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. Indiana was getting their brains beat in by Michigan, Ohio State, Minnesota, etc. in football, so they focused on basketball. And so on. There just weren't many programs focusing on basketball back then, so the ones who did dominated and established tradition.[/QUOTE

Both Indiana and Kentucky are basketball states because their rural high school districts were so small that basketball was the only sport they could play. There were HS state champions in the 40’s that had only 6 or 7 players on a team. Those high school players almost all stayed home and played for IU or UK. That, combined with the coaching of Adolph Rupp, Branch McCracken and Bobby Knight are the reasons why those schools dominated basketball and became powerful. There was no secret meeting where they gathered to mourn their football failure and replace it with basketball. There was a point where Indiana HS basketball was such a big thing, that people would take family vacations and drive to Indiana to watch it. With that history, those were the states you wanted to be in if you were a great coach like Rupp or McCracken. Those corn farm kids were 90% of the national talent.
 

GregAmsler

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No one is saying that there was a secret meeting. And you are correct. But Kansas, Kentucky, and Indiana (the schools, not the states), were focusing money and resources on basketball when everyone else in their conferences was focusing on football and largely ignoring basketball. It was a path of far less resistance and it gave them a head start establishing basketball tradition before everyone else. I remember going to the NCAA museum/HQ in Indianapolis a few years ago and there was a video they showed that talked about this phenomenon.

Obviously, the factors you mentioned played a huge role as to why they made this choice. They’re not in opposition to what I’m saying.

We’ve all heard the story about Rupp getting a Cadillac and Bear getting a watch. A select handful of schools chose to take the basketball path while most of America was focusing on football, at least as the heavy priority.
 

Stoerner Fumbles

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No one is saying that there was a secret meeting. And you are correct. But Kansas, Kentucky, and Indiana (the schools, not the states), were focusing money and resources on basketball when everyone else in their conferences was focusing on football and largely ignoring basketball. It was a path of far less resistance and it gave them a head start establishing basketball tradition before everyone else. I remember going to the NCAA museum/HQ in Indianapolis a few years ago and there was a video they showed that talked about this phenomenon.

Obviously, the factors you mentioned played a huge role as to why they made this choice. They’re not in opposition to what I’m saying.

We’ve all heard the story about Rupp getting a Cadillac and Bear getting a watch. A select handful of schools chose to take the basketball path while most of America was focusing on football, at least as the heavy priority.
Definitely. I was just making the point that all that in state talent from schools that could only afford basketball made it all possible. During the depression and WW2, even the medium sized schools couldn’t afford to play football.
 
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Mike Wilson covers the basketball and baseball beats for the News Sentinel.
Grant ramey is the best currently covering vols basketball in my opinion. Rob Lewis for years seemed to be the most plugged in source wise but like others have discussed it feels like he’s definitely fallen off in that regard as of late
 

Stoerner Fumbles

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UCLA was also one of the first basketball teams which was bought. They truly had the best teams money could buy. Kentucky and others soon learned how it works.
Papa Sam Gilbert paid players, but oddly after they were on the team. He bought them clothes and food, and it was definitely illegal. It’s just weird that they apparently didn’t use it to recruit.
 

VOLINVONORE

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Papa Sam Gilbert paid players, but oddly after they were on the team. He bought them clothes and food, and it was definitely illegal. It’s just weird that they apparently didn’t use it to recruit.
I am certain they did use money and other incentives in their recruiting. That is the scuttled but that was going around when I was in school and had a brother who played football at cal Berkeley in the middle- late 1940s. He was connected with what was going on In LA
 
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Ace

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Say what you want about KNS, but Mike is consistently very good with his stories and coverage. One of the best writers in Knoxville who has produced some great content in the past year. Had that piece on Zeigler, for example
He needs to leave KNS then. John Adams has poisoned the paper for many Vol fans
 

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