Some history behind Neyland stadium

#3

Aerie Vol

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#3
Hmmm.... not to be a nitpicker here, but that was a rather poorly written article. Maybe Marvin West is a really old guy (I have no idea) whose service and contributions should be accepted and appreciated as what they are, for his respect has been long earned and well deserved. If he's just some normal journalist, the article was not good. But on to much more important things:

Neyland Stadium is, in fact, 100 years old. He refutes his own hypothesis in the article when he references the original wooden bleachers on a concrete foundation which "still remains." THAT, simplistic as it may be, IS Neyland Stadium. It is the stadium that was originally built in 1921 to "surround" Shields-Watkins Field. That the modern version completely hides that foundation and bears no resemblance to the original is in no way a buttress to his argument. That Neyland sadly passed away before the name was changed is also decidedly irrelevant.

And for the kicker - I still have the plastic cup from one of my first games back in 1981. It was a celebration of Neyland Stadium upgrades (the horseshoe having only recently been filled in). The picture from his article is the first picture on the cup, also dated 1921. It's clear, for over 40 years now, that UT has considered 1921 the birthdate of Neyland Stadium.
 
#4

VOLINVONORE

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#4
This brings back old memories. When I enrolled in Tennessee in 1956, the only seats in the North end zone were a single row of sets similar to what high school had along the sidelines. The score board was on the hill behind the North end zone. The Athletic dorm was located in the South-East side of the stadium. Coaches would have room check every night between 11 and 12 PM. There were no lights so not night games. Games almost always started at 1PM. There weight room was about the size of my kitchen and there was only one wooden rack for doing squats. I was in there one day and Doug Atkins and another offensive lineman were working out and they almost filled the entire room.
If you want to Reagan excellent book about the beginning history of Tennessee football, you may want to read the book "the big orange writer by Russ Bebb published in 1973 and includes 399 numbers pages.
 
#5

firedog28

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#5
This brings back old memories. When I enrolled in Tennessee in 1956, the only seats in the North end zone were a single row of sets similar to what high school had along the sidelines. The score board was on the hill behind the North end zone. The Athletic dorm was located in the South-East side of the stadium. Coaches would have room check every night between 11 and 12 PM. There were no lights so not night games. Games almost always started at 1PM. There weight room was about the size of my kitchen and there was only one wooden rack for doing squats. I was in there one day and Doug Atkins and another offensive lineman were working out and they almost filled the entire room.
If you want to Reagan excellent book about the beginning history of Tennessee football, you may want to read the book "the big orange writer by Russ Bebb published in 1973 and includes 399 numbers pages.
UT-Neyland 1.jpg
 
#6

ksgovols

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#6
1626800984272.png

Semantics maybe, but I'd consider the playing surface and hallowed grounds 100 years old and the stadium an evolving entity for seating and facade with several makeovers over the years. The trustees in fact named the stadium separately from the playing surface. Do 17 rows of wooden bleachers meet the definition of stadium? Probably not.

At any rate, we are celebrating 100 years of playing at the same place continuously with the exception of the WWII years when the university didn't field a team.
 

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