SEC Lifts Ban on Alcohol Sales in Stadiums

AM64

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So you've never been to a game at Neyland?
When I first started going to games at Neyland, many students actually wore blazers and ties, the north end was open, and it was Doug Dickey's first year as the coach. And, yes, people smuggled in booze. My proposal would be one part of the stadium for the party crowd and another for those who are there for the football. Times change, but I doubt that I'm the only one who goes to a game (or watches at home) for the game itself rather than an excuse for a drunken party ... and I do drink when I want ,,, and I do want the beer barrel brought back to the KY game.
 

BeardedVol

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When I first started going to games at Neyland, many students actually wore blazers and ties, the north end was open, and it was Doug Dickey's first year as the coach. And, yes, people smuggled in booze. My proposal would be one part of the stadium for the party crowd and another for those who are there for the football. Times change, but I doubt that I'm the only one who goes to a game (or watches at home) for the game itself rather than an excuse for a drunken party ... and I do drink when I want ,,, and I do want the beer barrel brought back to the KY game.
Why do you believe that you are the only person who is capable of consuming alcohol without becoming a raging drunk? You do know that it is possible to responsibly consume alcohol at a public event, right? Literally millions of people, at thousands of sporting events do it every year.
 

AM64

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Why do you believe that you are the only person who is capable of consuming alcohol without becoming a raging drunk? You do know that it is possible to responsibly consume alcohol at a public event, right? Literally millions of people, at thousands of sporting events do it every year.
I don't assume that at all, or that others are incapable of consuming responsibly. The dissenters here are talking about the people who can't, won't, or are incapable of even evaluating and tempering their own behavior. I've seen them, and I assume you have, too.
 

BeardedVol

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I don't assume that at all, or that others are incapable of consuming responsibly. The dissenters here are talking about the people who can't, won't, or are incapable of even evaluating and tempering their own behavior. I've seen them, and I assume you have, too.
Those people are already binge drinking before the game, and/or sneaking in airplane bottles of liquor to consume during the game.

The idea that selling beer at the stadium will suddenly cause responsible consumers of alcohol to become irresponsible consumers of alcohol has no basis in reality. The drunks that will supposedly keep you at home on game day, are already present at every game, and have been your entire life.

In fact, the early data which has already been linked, suggests that the selling of alcohol actually correlates to a decrease in alcohol related incidents in and around the stadium.
 

AM64

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Those people are already binge drinking before the game, and/or sneaking in airplane bottles of liquor to consume during the game.

The idea that selling beer at the stadium will suddenly cause responsible consumers of alcohol to become irresponsible consumers of alcohol has no basis in reality. The drunks that will supposedly keep you at home on game day, are already present at every game, and have been your entire life.

In fact, the early data which has already been linked, suggests that the selling of alcohol actually correlates to a decrease in alcohol related incidents in and around the stadium.
My original post was agreeing with someone that drunken behavior (ie, not responsible consumption) in the stadium was a good reason to watch at home. My comment was aimed at current behavior - before beer sales are even permitted in Neyland, and it was never aimed at responsible alcohol consumption. What "data" and "studies" show or suggest, frequently depend on the view or goals of the person presenting the "facts".
 

Jack Burton

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It’s important to note that liquor & beer have been allowed in Neyland for decades. You just had to be wealthy to be allowed to consume it. The “haves” could do anything they wanted in their suites, now the “have nots” can buy a $9 Miller Lite.
 

MWAVolfan

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You say that as if there isn't already consumption of liquor inside the stadium, and a plethora of binge drinking prior to every game.
the difference now is that it's going to be officially sanctions and in a big way encouraged. It will also make people who would have thought twice about bringing hard liquor in not think a thing about it at all.

As I said before, anyone who thinks this is going to make things "better" or "less dangerous" don't understand these people. Basically the SEC is trading your safety for a cut of the action.

I think things are going to be just fine at all sporting events other than football games. Basketballs, baseball, etc , no problems. It will be much like buying beer at a Titans game or a MLB game. No big deal. But SEC football is different. Those fans are different and they become something different at football games that isn't the same in any part of the rest of their lives.

It's going to be very interesting for sure. Being able to get tanked before the game and now drink in the stadium with no fear of retribution. Did some people already do that? Sure, sort of although there was always the threat of being caught and tossed out. But now, nothing.
Some people arent going to change their habits because they arent going to buy expensive beer. But if alcohol will be acceptable in the stadium and no one is walking around policing it, they can go further than they would have before.
 

BeardedVol

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the difference now is that it's going to be officially sanctions and in a big way encouraged. It will also make people who would have thought twice about bringing hard liquor in not think a thing about it at all.

As I said before, anyone who thinks this is going to make things "better" or "less dangerous" don't understand these people. Basically the SEC is trading your safety for a cut of the action.

I think things are going to be just fine at all sporting events other than football games. Basketballs, baseball, etc , no problems. It will be much like buying beer at a Titans game or a MLB game. No big deal. But SEC football is different. Those fans are different and they become something different at football games that isn't the same in any part of the rest of their lives.

It's going to be very interesting for sure. Being able to get tanked before the game and now drink in the stadium with no fear of retribution. Did some people already do that? Sure, sort of although there was always the threat of being caught and tossed out. But now, nothing.
Some people arent going to change their habits because they arent going to buy expensive beer. But if alcohol will be acceptable in the stadium and no one is walking around policing it, they can go further than they would have before.
How is SEC football any different than any other sporting event? The conference doesn't have a monopoly on passionate or idiot fans.

There is no evidence that people who are currently not binge drinking and/or sneaking liquor into the stadium are going to suddenly turn into raging drunks because they can purchase beer at Neyland. Again, early evidence points to a decrease in over-consumption when alcohol is sold in the stadium. The people who won't purchase expensive beer in the stadium, and choose to continue to binge drink before the game or sneak in their own liquor, are already doing so; the sale of beer is not going to affect them, but that's irrelevant because it's occurring even without alcohol being sold in the stadium.
 

Volfan76

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How is SEC football any different than any other sporting event? The conference doesn't have a monopoly on passionate or idiot fans.

There is no evidence that people who are currently not binge drinking and/or sneaking liquor into the stadium are going to suddenly turn into raging drunks because they can purchase beer at Neyland. Again, early evidence points to a decrease in over-consumption when alcohol is sold in the stadium. The people who won't purchase expensive beer in the stadium, and choose to continue to binge drink before the game or sneak in their own liquor, are already doing so; the sale of beer is not going to affect them, but that's irrelevant because it's occurring even without alcohol being sold in the stadium.
Lol...the ridiculous arguments and excuses of drinkers for the "other bad drinkers" is indication enough that this is bad idea all around.
 

BeardedVol

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Lol...the ridiculous arguments and excuses of drinkers for the "other bad drinkers" is indication enough that this is bad idea all around.
So you of course have evidence to the contrary that supports your neo-prohibitionist beliefs?

TO SERVE AND PROTECT: DOES SELLING ALCOHOL AT INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOTBALL STADIUMS EQUATE TO HIGHER CRIMINAL ACTIVITY?

The significant findings suggest that criminal offenses and alcohol related incidents are higher on game days in comparison to non-game days. Furthermore, the results did not suggest that criminal offenses and alcohol related incidents will go down after selling alcohol, but they did not suggest that they will go up either

Is Change Coming Soon to the SEC's Stadium-Wide Alcohol Sales Policy? (2018)

As the athletic director at West Virginia in 2011, Oliver Luck led a movement to begin selling alcohol stadium-wide there.“Binge drinking is curtailed,” said Luck, now an executive with the NCAA, in an interview Thursday. “Instead of people shotgunning beers or chugging hard liquor before a game … they don’t have to do that. They know they can buy a beer or glass of wine during the game.” Luck said incidents of binge drinking dropped “25 to 30%” at West Virginia.

It's ok to just say that you are afraid of people drinking alcohol in your presence. The first step in dealing with your issues, is coming to terms with their existence.
 

hog88

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the difference now is that it's going to be officially sanctions and in a big way encouraged. It will also make people who would have thought twice about bringing hard liquor in not think a thing about it at all.

As I said before, anyone who thinks this is going to make things "better" or "less dangerous" don't understand these people. Basically the SEC is trading your safety for a cut of the action.

I think things are going to be just fine at all sporting events other than football games. Basketballs, baseball, etc , no problems. It will be much like buying beer at a Titans game or a MLB game. No big deal. But SEC football is different. Those fans are different and they become something different at football games that isn't the same in any part of the rest of their lives.

It's going to be very interesting for sure. Being able to get tanked before the game and now drink in the stadium with no fear of retribution. Did some people already do that? Sure, sort of although there was always the threat of being caught and tossed out. But now, nothing.
Some people arent going to change their habits because they arent going to buy expensive beer. But if alcohol will be acceptable in the stadium and no one is walking around policing it, they can go further than they would have before.
Oh the horrors! Carnage an anarchy here we come.
 

hog88

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How is SEC football any different than any other sporting event? The conference doesn't have a monopoly on passionate or idiot fans.

There is no evidence that people who are currently not binge drinking and/or sneaking liquor into the stadium are going to suddenly turn into raging drunks because they can purchase beer at Neyland. Again, early evidence points to a decrease in over-consumption when alcohol is sold in the stadium. The people who won't purchase expensive beer in the stadium, and choose to continue to binge drink before the game or sneak in their own liquor, are already doing so; the sale of beer is not going to affect them, but that's irrelevant because it's occurring even without alcohol being sold in the stadium.
Dude, haven't you noticed the drunken abhorrent behavior and carnage at every bowl/neutral site game an SEC team plays in? People are lucky they live through them and my goodness think of the children!
 

MWAVolfan

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How is SEC football any different than any other sporting event? The conference doesn't have a monopoly on passionate or idiot fans.
Yes, yes they do. A much much much higher percentage of the fan base because college football isnt a big deal at all outside of about 8 schools not in the American south (I'm going by region and not just conference so I'm including the southern parts of the ACC and Big12).

Other places also have more sporting options to attend and going to games isnt as big a deal as it is in SEC country. The opportunity to act like fools is largely concentrated on football games and Nascar races. I've lived all over the US and been tu just about every type of sporting event and the level of rowdiness at SEC football games is a whole other level. Basically I've taken my kids to NFL games, MLB games, NBA playoff games and never an SEC game. I only go by myself or with my wife to those until my kids are older.
 
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BeardedVol

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Yes, yes they do. A much much much higher percentage of the fan base because college football isnt a big deal at all outside of about 8 schools not in the American south (I'm going by region and not just conference so I'm including the southern parts of the ACC and Big12).

Other places also have more sporting options to attend and going to games isnt as big a deal as it is in SEC country. The opportunity to act like fools is largely concentrated on football games and Nascar races. I've lived all over the US and been tu just about every type of sporting event and the level of rowdiness at SEC football games is a whole other level. Basically I've taken my kids to NFL games, MLB games, NBA playoff games and never an SEC game. I only go by myself or with my wife to those until my kids are older.
Teams with fanbases as passionate or stupid as any SEC team: Steelers, Patriots, Texas, Michigan, Nebraska, Florida State, Red Sox, every single NASCAR driver with a substantial following.

You can tell yourself whatever you need to in order to justify your illogical fear that alcohol being sold at SEC football games will result in some sort of drunken viking invasion spilling out of the stadium. In the end it's going to happen, and the seats your wife and children leave vacant will be filled by someone else's wife and kids.
 

gatorhater1509

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I think things are going to be just fine at all sporting events other than football games. Basketballs, baseball, etc , no problems. It will be much like buying beer at a Titans game or a MLB game. No big deal. But SEC football is different. Those fans are different and they become something different at football games that isn't the same in any part of the rest of their lives.
Canada says, "how's it going, eh?" By that logic, alcohol should be banned at NHL games in the north and Canada.
 

MWAVolfan

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Teams with fanbases as passionate or stupid as any SEC team: Steelers, Patriots, Texas, Michigan, Nebraska, Florida State, Red Sox, every single NASCAR driver with a substantial following.

You can tell yourself whatever you need to in order to justify your illogical fear that alcohol being sold at SEC football games will result in some sort of drunken viking invasion spilling out of the stadium. In the end it's going to happen, and the seats your wife and children leave vacant will be filled by someone else's wife and kids.

I never said any of that. I said anyone who looks at SEC football and believes this is going to REDUCE the number of incidents and not increase them is going to be wrong. Its the reason why none of the schools are lining up to sell alcohol to anyone except big donors or not participating at all.

the only way it would reduce incidents would be if police just give up and stop trying.
 

TrueVolsGBOInsider

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The only real question is how much money can the universities make by selling beer in their stadiums? That’s the figure I’d want to see, if the money is too good to pass up then yes, by all means start selling alcohol
At games. But if the schools can’t make enough to put it back into their stadiums or players or facilities then I don’t want to see it happen. Just my 2 cents
 

BeardedVol

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I never said any of that. I said anyone who looks at SEC football and believes this is going to REDUCE the number of incidents and not increase them is going to be wrong. Its the reason why none of the schools are lining up to sell alcohol to anyone except big donors or not participating at all.

the only way it would reduce incidents would be if police just give up and stop trying.
Cool. Feel free to let me know when you have any data to backup your assertions that SEC fans are somehow less-capable of drinking responsibly than any other humans.
 
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