Recruiting Forum Football Talk IV

Volstar65

Beast of the Southeast
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Yep the cell kept picking up and touching back down all the way down I-40 until obliterating the highway 70 area between Baxter and cookeville. It finally ended rapidly only a mile or less from Tennessee Tech campus. If it hit the highly populated dorms and surrounding apartments at EF4 intensity like it was going, it would have been the deadliest tornado in history.
33E17D4E-3B03-4751-9867-6629CA31B2BE.jpeg Macbroom Chapel In Cookeville the evening of the tornado. My sister in laws home was destroyed and many lost there lives in this neighborhood. Echo valley same story. I went and helped with the cleanup at their site. That was a nasty storm. Seeing the aftermath on tv or in pictures doesn’t do the damage justice.
 

SoilVol

No step on snek
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I wished you would tell me how. Been hunting there for going on 6 years in the same field and still cant figure them out
We left 6 years ago on the nose... why do you think we left?

Because everyone from Middle Tennessee started showing up, lodges started getting built, locals started jacking up lease prices, more flooded fields, etc etc. Harder and harder to kill ducks every year on top of poor migrations. The final straw was the farmer's son kicked us off our field that we had rights to for 15-20 years. We didn't have a lodge, we rented a concrete pad with electric availability and put a trailer. My grandfather and his buddies spent countless hours driving and scouting fields with consistent bird use, then door knocking for permissions. Started out with doing favors with farmers, then lease prices started going up as more people showed up.

Location is important. You can't just flood and hunt any old field and have a ton of success. Some locations will consistently kill more ducks than others and ducks have always used those spots. The people that scout and have the most familiarity with the area know where those locations are, and sometimes trick others into taking the bad spots.
 

NMVol

Fort Sanders Refugee
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Something like a colonial town, I suppose. Between a small community and a fort.

Most were in Alaska, gathering resources and seeing what was beyond the Eastern hemisphere. But went as far south as a fort in California.

Russian America - Wikipedia
The novel The Crying of Lot 49 by Pynchon deals with aspects of this. Been awhile since I read it. Don't remember the details.
 

VOLuptuousBOOMS

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We left 6 years ago on the nose... why do you think we left?

Because everyone from Middle Tennessee started showing up, lodges started getting built, locals started jacking up lease prices, more flooded fields, etc etc. Harder and harder to kill ducks every year on top of poor migrations. The final straw was the farmer's son kicked us off our field that we had rights to for 15-20 years. We didn't have a lodge, we rented a concrete pad with electric availability and put a trailer. My grandfather and his buddies spent countless hours driving and scouting fields with consistent bird use, then door knocking for permissions. Started out with doing favors with farmers, then lease prices started going up as more people showed up.

Location is important. You can't just flood and hunt any old field and have a ton of success. Some locations will consistently kill more ducks than others and ducks have always used those spots. The people that scout and have the most familiarity with the area know where those locations are, and sometimes trick others into taking the bad spots.
Ducks are imprinted to certain spots that they have been going to for thousands of years. This goes back to before human intervention, IE drainage canals and farmland. That it especially evident in the boothill where every field looks virtually the same.

I’m sure there is some scientific word for this, but I’ve been an avid duck hunter my entire life and ducks just like certain spots more than others. It’s like an instinct for them.

Knowing how to hunt, expensive spreads, gadgets, and good calling are all good tools, but being at the right spot trumps everything else by a factor of 100.
 

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SoilVol

No step on snek
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Ducks are imprinted to certain spots that they have been going to for thousands of years. This goes back to before human intervention, IE drainage canals and farmland. That it especially evident in the boothill where every field looks virtually the same.

I’m sure there is some scientific word for this, but I’ve been an avid duck hunter my entire life and ducks just like certain spots more than others. It’s like an instinct for them.

Knowing how to hunt, expensive spreads, gadgets, and good calling are all good tools, but being at the right spot trumps everything else by a factor of 100.
We call that "Find the X"

You nailed it. You do it long enough and get familiar enough with the area, you know where things like to be. True for generation after generation of ducks, deer, turkeys, even fish.
20211218_075122.jpg
 

Brillovol

We are THE Volunteer State
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No UT players were ever forced to leave because of the investigation..

There's proof that Heupel even tried retaining kids that were recruited by Niedermeyer, or were rumored to be paid.

The NCAA never mandated punishment to players, nor were they ever questioned about their involvement.

All they wanted was the coaches involved. Mainly to get Pruitt out.

Eric Gray would have stayed at Tennessee, if Heupel retained Jay Graham..

He refused to retain Graham..

Graham still trains Gray in the offseason, that's why he chose a HS coaching job in TN, instead of joining Alabama's staff as ST coordinator and TE coach.

He turned down the RB coaching position that Gillespie took, because Danny White had assured Graham that himself, Garner, and Steele would be retained.

Which was lies.. Heupel didn't want any of them, and was forced to hire Garner.
1651461633598.gif
 

Paper_Towel

VolNation's Russo-Ukraine War Correspondent
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Ducks are imprinted to certain spots that they have been going to for thousands of years. This goes back to before human intervention, IE drainage canals and farmland. That it especially evident in the boothill where every field looks virtually the same.

I’m sure there is some scientific word for this, but I’ve been an avid duck hunter my entire life and ducks just like certain spots more than others. It’s like an instinct for them.

Knowing how to hunt, expensive spreads, gadgets, and good calling are all good tools, but being at the right spot trumps everything else by a factor of 100.
How are duck populations doing? Have you seen any changes throughout your time? Just genuinely curious, I don’t know anything about them and if they’re being effected in any way.
 

VOLuptuousBOOMS

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How are duck populations doing? Have you seen any changes throughout your time? Just genuinely curious, I don’t know anything about them and if they’re being effected in any way.
Well I’m only 30 so may not be the best to answer that question from personal experience.

But my opinion is that populations have probably increased over the last 40-50 years, but are not what they were pre European colonization.

Most people would disagree with me on the population increase, because people are killing far less ducks than 50 years ago. The lack of killing is a totally separate can of worms that may be the most divisive topic in the duck hunting world.

I personally feel that the implementation of refuges and the increasing popularity of hunting is forcing ducks to evolve and become nocturnal. They pretty much sit on refuges all day then go feed on rich people from Nashville’s (that’s who owns all the duck hunting land now) corn all night.
 

O.G.HomeGrownUTVOL

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I completely remember him! I was at my very 1st Braves game at Fulton County stadium sitting down the 1st baseline. Before the game the pitchers were warming up and Wohlers threw a wild pitch hitting a security guard in the back right in the spine. They wheeled him out on a stretcher! Crazy first game.
I have to correct myself, that was my second game. My dad, his friends that took us,and I arrived in Atlanta on Saturday but we only had tickets for Sundays game so we went to see the stadium that night. I was 8 years old and my dad let me walk a step in front of him yelling " anyone got any tickets " and some how this sweet lady walked up and said here you go honey and just like that we found 2 tickets center field upper deck! Dads friends told us to go ahead cause they had seen a lot of games and this was our first one. I was lucky because I got to see Dion Sanders last game as a Brave, he was traded that night. The next day when I seen the wild pitch I also got to see Sammy Sosa crank one. Pretty memorable experience for an eight year old.
 
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