Per Hyams - Tennessee shut down due to Covid

OrangeSoddyDaisy

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Some Prussian Army chief of staff said, like 100 years ago, something along these lines:

-- The intelligent who is also energetic will make an excellent General Staff officer.
-- The intelligent who is lazy, make him a field commander; he will excel at delegating less important tasks and focusing on the important.
-- The stupid who is lazy is fine as a soldier.
-- But the stupid who is energetic, get rid of him immediately; he can do untold harm.
I was referring more specifically to the idea of infinite regression...but thanks for the lesson.
 

OrangeSoddyDaisy

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Yeah. I've seen that before and it is literally an apples and oranges type of argument. Liquids do not behave the same way gases and particles suspended in them behave.

Here's a more appropriate analogy. You are in a room with a tank leaking a toxic gas. You put a piece of plastic across the leak that reduces it by maybe 20-30%. The toxicity still builds... you still die. Same scenario outside... you don't die unless you hover right over the tank with or without the "mask".

Should people coughing with obvious symptoms wear a mask? Better if they stay home but coughs and sneezes are where masks might have some benefit... not on people without symptoms.
Virus isn't a gas
 

OrangeSoddyDaisy

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I ate breakfast in a full dinner this morning with no masks anywhere. My kids play sports, ride the bus and have been in school since August. They even spent all last summer at camp and will do it again this year. Maybe you will allow your life to change but some of us are thankfully allowed to continue on. UT football should be one of those things allowed to continue based on the science
Do you think there is any possible connection to people living their lives as if there is nothing wrong and that the football team has Covid?
 
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WilcoVolsFan

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The word to know is "endemic."

It is the future of covid-19.

Coronavirus started in one province of China as an epidemic ("a widespread occurrence of an infectious disease in a community"). Then it spread beyond the Wuhan province, across China and around the globe, and became a pandemic ("(of a disease) prevalent over a whole country or the world"). And as we get used to living with it, develop a degree of herd immunity (but never 100%, it's not going away entirely, ever), it will become endemic ("(of a disease or condition) regularly found among people or in a certain area").

Just as the flu is. Just as the common cold is. It is not going away, ever.

So far so good in your post. But I think you're wrong about "life as you knew it is probably a thing of the past". I think that's off. I think we'll get back to normal as we achieve a significant degree of herd immunity.

Will people continue to die of covid-19? Yes. And they die every year of the flu. And pneumonia. But the % who die of covid will drop dramatically as we reach some steady state of herd immunity, enough of a natural buffer among the population that the disease doesn't find so many ultra-vulnerable victims in any given season.

That's the future. Covid-19 endemic to the human population. And us getting on with life.
I agree with most of this. As vaccines become more widely available, we should be able to get a level of herd immunity. A couple big caveats will be the virus mutations (how many, how contagious/deadly, and what level of immunity do vaccines offer), the anti-Vax/Mask/Science wallowing in their ignorance and refusing vaccinations, and cowardly politicians who cater to them.

That said, I don't think we'll ever see our old "normal" again. That doesn't mean masks & social distancing per se, but it does mean changes like the increased demise of brick-and-mortar retailers and the growth of online delivery, workplaces changing from centralized locations to remote, the migration away from large cities and high-tax states, increased virtual education options, etc. I don't think we've any idea of the full impact of socio-economic changes coming our way but they'll be big, permanent, and have impact in nearly every aspect of life.
 

Catbone

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Wait.

Why the long faces?

Spring practice isn't scheduled to start until Tuesday (the 23rd), anyway.

Re-read the tweet: "...is scheduled to reopen on Monday [the 22nd], if no further outbreaks."

Monday comes before Tuesday.

Why all the heavy mouth-breathing?
Because it's going to continue to happen . Just like last year during spring practice. Tennessee has more strict rules than the rest of the SEC and it's bullsht
 

utvolpj

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Do you think there is any possible connection to people living their lives as if there is nothing wrong and that the football team has Covid?
If there was then a state like FL would be doing so much worse than others who don't allow citizens to live their lives.

Saying the "football team has covid" is likely a gross exaggeration. There was a positive test somewhere and they got shut down with contract tracing. Even my kids school didn't hold people out for tracing, only symptoms. This need to shut down up to 6 degrees of separation is absurdity
 
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BruisedOrange

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So what are the NCAA rules this spring for practice? Are they only limiting total practice hours over a longer period, in order to allow for temporary shutdowns?

How many weeks do we have to get in our allotted practice hours?

This is really critical time for us, installing a new offense and defense.
 

utvolpj

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So what are the NCAA rules this spring for practice? Are they only limiting total practice hours over a longer period, in order to allow for temporary shutdowns?

How many weeks do we have to get in our allotted practice hours?

This is really critical time for us, installing a new offense and defense.
It won't matter since we will be subject to local rules and regulations
 

GAVol

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If there was then a state like FL would be doing so much worse than others who don't allow citizens to live their lives.

Saying the "football team has covid" is likely a gross exaggeration. There was a positive test somewhere and they got shut down with contract tracing. Even my kids school didn't hold people out for tracing, only symptoms. This need to shut down up to 6 degrees of separation is absurdity
The "Covid logic" that goes on with this stuff is absurd. They close down the football facility, but do the players have to leave their dorm? Do they stop going to class? Do they still go eat lunch somewhere?
 
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WilcoVolsFan

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Yeah. I've seen that before and it is literally an apples and oranges type of argument. Liquids do not behave the same way gases and particles suspended in them behave.

Here's a more appropriate analogy. You are in a room with a tank leaking a toxic gas. You put a piece of plastic across the leak that reduces it by maybe 20-30%. The toxicity still builds... you still die. Same scenario outside... you don't die unless you hover right over the tank with or without the "mask".

Should people coughing with obvious symptoms wear a mask? Better if they stay home but coughs and sneezes are where masks might have some benefit... not on people without symptoms.
Wow. That's a whole lot of f'n ignorance packed into a couple of sentences.
  1. Viruses aren't a gas. They're a microscopic solid.
  2. Viruses don't have legs or wings. They travel in saliva droplets or are left on surfaces. Masks help block and reduce these droplets. Washing your hands with soap kills them.
  3. Viral load matters. Coughing or sneezing on someone increases the viral load but simply breathing also releases droplets. The load is also increased in closed (indoor) environments where air circulates.
  4. You can still have the virus and spread to others while pre-symptomatic (will develop symptoms, but haven't yet) and asymptomatic (will never develop symptoms)
  5. You talking is a toxic gas. It spreads stupid ideas to other stupid people encouraging stupid behavior that causes people to needlessly die.
 

utvolpj

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The "Covid logic" that goes on with this stuff is absurd. They close down the football facility, but do the players have to leave their dorm? Do they stop going to class? Do they still go eat lunch somewhere?
class question is interesting since it's required for participation and to stay eligible

It's like eliminating the handshake and limiting the participants for the coin toss. But then can go play a full game together and that's more acceptable
 

WilcoVolsFan

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If there was then a state like FL would be doing so much worse than others who don't allow citizens to live their lives.
Not that you'll read anything that doesn't support the opinion you've already formed, but...

  • Despite different restrictions during the pandemic, California and Florida have similar per capita rates of COVID-19 cases.
  • Experts say safety rules are only part of the equation when it comes to COVID-19 case spread. There’s also housing density, income levels, and health systems.
  • Experts note that North Dakota and South Dakota are among the least restrictive states but are among the highest in per capita cases.
Why California, Florida Have Similar Number of COVID-19 Cases
 

utvolpj

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Not that you'll read anything that doesn't support the opinion you've already formed, but...

  • Despite different restrictions during the pandemic, California and Florida have similar per capita rates of COVID-19 cases.
  • Experts say safety rules are only part of the equation when it comes to COVID-19 case spread. There’s also housing density, income levels, and health systems.
  • Experts note that North Dakota and South Dakota are among the least restrictive states but are among the highest in per capita cases.
Why California, Florida Have Similar Number of COVID-19 Cases
I really like the cherry picking excuse then holding up Vermont and Hawaii as examples in the next paragraph
This doesn’t necessarily prove that more restrictions are better than fewer, either — and that’s just the point.
I know which side of the line I'll stand on. We know who this targets and that tells me shutting down a college athlete is ignorance. It's science
 

OrangeSoddyDaisy

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Wow. That's a whole lot of f'n ignorance packed into a couple of sentences.
  1. Viruses aren't a gas. They're a microscopic solid.
  2. Viruses don't have legs or wings. They travel in saliva droplets or are left on surfaces. Masks help block and reduce these droplets. Washing your hands with soap kills them.
  3. Viral load matters. Coughing or sneezing on someone increases the viral load but simply breathing also releases droplets. The load is also increased in closed (indoor) environments where air circulates.
  4. You can still have the virus and spread to others while pre-symptomatic (will develop symptoms, but haven't yet) and asymptomatic (will never develop symptoms)
  5. You talking is a toxic gas. It spreads stupid ideas to other stupid people encouraging stupid behavior that causes people to needlessly die.
The last phrase of the last sentence is something I've thought about a lot. I've heard ignorant people bloviate about how masks, vaccines, distancing can't work and wondered out loud "what if someone who innocently knows no better believes what they hear and choose not to take simple precautions?", then catch it and die.

It all makes even less sense when the same naysayers:
1. Religiously wear a seatbelt when they probably won't have a wreck
2. Stop at stop signs when there is probably no car coming
3. Wear orange in a deer stand but probably won't get shot
4. Take a life vest in a boat...
5. Lock their doors when they are away...
6. Have smoke alarms in their home...
7. Pay income taxes...

I could go on and on.
 

WilcoVolsFan

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Young people don't get sick in any appreciable numbers. Contact tracing is worthless. This is dumb
Young people are MORE likely to get sick with Covid due to their higher risk behaviors. They are less likely to become severely ill or die from it, but that doesn't mean they don't spread it to others who are at higher risks.

To think that a virus that originated in the Wuhan province of China and spread around the entire globe in a few months can't be spread by the young is pretty dumb.
 

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