Need Your Opinion (Poll)

Would you give to a NIL fund for your favorite team if it was also used to raise money for charity?


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    197
#1
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#1
I’m doing market research and need some feedback. By now, the average fan has probably heard that amateur athletes (depending on state laws) may profit off of their name, image and likeness (NIL). The majority of this is being done through advertising and merchandise (autographs, memorabilia, etc.) from what I’ve seen. There is a lot of controversy on how this has and will impact college athletics and how NIL could further increase the level of vanity that is already present. With that being said, there is also the possibility of NIL being used for good as we’ve seen cases where some athletes have decided to donate their NIL earnings to charity.

Here is where I need your opinion: If there was an NIL fund for athletes of your favorite team that was more slanted toward a good cause (a percentage going to charity) how likely would you be to get involved financially in some capacity? Let’s assume the athlete would get between 50-70 percent of the deal.

Please provide as much detail as you can of your opinion on this in the comments below. Thanks for your participation!
 
#2

Ten_Titans

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#2
Charity doesn't really have anything to do with it for me. If a player is going to sell me something, great. If they are going to donate some portion of that to charity, even better.

But say player A wants $20,000 of "NIL" money to play for Tennessee (quotes being for the fact that it has nothing to do with NIL) , and pinky swears he's going to give some portion of that to charity... No I wouldn't give money to that.
 
#5

njvols

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#5
Not for nothing, but if I want to give $100 to a local food bank, then I want $100 going to the food bank. Think it gets into a slippery slope and need for full disclosure. Know all charities have "overhead" to cover, but there's many examples of charity funds going to places the the contributors do not intend (the small print)..and, to this point, college football doesn't seem to be the best example of full disclosure when it comes to integrity in regards to recruiting + NIL.
 
#10

GAVol

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#10
Answer is yes. I'm envisioning a scenario where I send money to an organization in need...like our defense. And then you send me a picture of a linebacker I've sponsored.
Lord knows, we could have a Sally Strothers commercial with footage of our defense from last season playing in the background.
 
#14

DaddyChad

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#14
I’m doing market research and need some feedback. By now, the average fan has probably heard that amateur athletes (depending on state laws) may profit off of their name, image and likeness (NIL). The majority of this is being done through advertising and merchandise (autographs, memorabilia, etc.) from what I’ve seen. There is a lot of controversy on how this has and will impact college athletics and how NIL could further increase the level of vanity that is already present. With that being said, there is also the possibility of NIL being used for good as we’ve seen cases where some athletes have decided to donate their NIL earnings to charity.

Here is where I need your opinion: If there was an NIL fund for athletes of your favorite team that was more slanted toward a good cause (a percentage going to charity) how likely would you be to get involved financially in some capacity? Let’s assume the athlete would get between 50-70 percent of the deal.

Please provide as much detail as you can of your opinion on this in the comments below. Thanks for your participation!
I think if you can make sure a portion goes to the athlete and a portion goes to a reputable charity then yes I think it’s a good deal. Have the athlete do commercials for the charity as well. Allow the charitable contributions to be a tax write off for the athlete as well if possible.

1)Most will give just to make the football program better.
2)Some that wouldn’t give just for the football will give bc it’s to charity.
3)If a football program can help its athletes and the community in the process that’s a win/win and it will pull money and probably be good advertising for the player and the program as well.
4)Unfortunately with any charity like anything else with lots of money involved there’s potential for misuse of funds.
 
Likes: sjt18
#16
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#16
I hate the proposed NIL deals, the transfer portal, and the college coaching carousel. It destroys the integrity of the game to the point that nobody cares where they go or what they do. The league minimum in the NFL is $660,000 per year. When a kid coming out of high-school can make more than that from an NIL deal then things have gone too far!
 
#17

Iam4utalways

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#17
Automatic tie to a charity might be the wrong move.

Fans supporting NILs, with the only expected ROI is to get a recruit to commit or to keep a player from hitting the portal or heading to the NFL, is a better plan.

To include a charity on the front end seems it might cloud the purpose. If the player wants to support a charity with their NIL money, that is such a good thing to do.
 
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#20

sjt18

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#20
I think if you can make sure a portion goes to the athlete and a portion goes to a reputable charity then yes I think it’s a good deal. Have the athlete do commercials for the charity as well. Allow the charitable contributions to be a tax write off for the athlete as well if possible.

1)Most will give just to make the football program better.
2)Some that wouldn’t give just for the football will give bc it’s to charity.
3)If a football program can help its athletes and the community in the process that’s a win/win and it will pull money and probably be good advertising for the player and the program as well.
4)Unfortunately with any charity like anything else with lots of money involved there’s potential for misuse of funds.
Agree. Excellent post.
 
#22
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Feb 11, 2010
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#22
Good stuff guys. Please keep the answers coming as this is very helpful.

A couple of follow up questions and remarks: envision a sports marketing business that accepts donations from fans and businesses alike and provides marketing services for players and businesses through those donations.

Would you be more likely to financially participate if:

1. You knew the marketing business was in charge of giving to the charity, not the player.

2. The marketing business had a full disclosure/audit request policy for all donors so they could see exactly where funds went and how much.

3. The donor got to choose specific players to sponsor (already on the team).

4. The donor got to pick from a list of charities.

5. The charity theme was for children or families who have lost children.

Please give as much feedback as possible.
 
#23
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#23
NIL and transfer portal are both disastrous ideas. There is not sensible or reasonable explanation for either. They will destroy amateur athletics. '
Why should one athlete be paid, while another does not? How can a team be built with so many "I" players? Human nature will cause disunity, as it should.

I loved players playing for team and school pride. A free college degree is not enough for many to play for. We are teaching athletes that loyalty is not important - the dollar is.
 
#24

MontyPython

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#24
NIL and transfer portal are both disastrous ideas. There is not sensible or reasonable explanation for either. They will destroy amateur athletics. '
Why should one athlete be paid, while another does not? How can a team be built with so many "I" players? Human nature will cause disunity, as it should.

I loved players playing for team and school pride. A free college degree is not enough for many to play for. We are teaching athletes that loyalty is not important - the dollar is.
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Likes: kcvols1
#25

i2amavol

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#25
Yes, I would give a small amount as part of a drive to help the Vols with NIL, but I do not understand the need to link it with a charity. Let people give to the charity of their choice, and give to Vols NIL separately. Forcing them to give to both would appear to me to be counterproductive.
 

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