ND coach. MUFFET

#51
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#51
Nope that is the paraphrase. She was asked if she would hire a male assistant coach on her staff and she said no. And then she elaborated:


Up until seven years ago, McGraw always had one male assistant on her staff. At the time, it felt obligatory: The AAU basketball ranks were filled with male coaches, and the scouting services were run by men. In order to have ready access to that network, McGraw figured that she’d better have a man on her staff.
And for a time, she admits, she found the optics appealing. “I kind of liked the idea that a woman was in charge,” McGraw said. “My team could see that like, I’m the boss. Yeah, he’s working for me.”

Interestingly, in the seven years since McGraw assembled her first all-female coaching staff, Notre Dame has made four Final Four appearances, three national championship games, and last year overcame the loss of four players to season-ending knee injuries to win the national championship game on back-to-back buzzer beaters by Arike Ogunbowale. In this year’s NCAA tournament, her team is once again a No. 1 seed — and slightly favored to repeat as national champions.


Looks like those all women staff have been most qualified for ND.

Tara Van deVeer also has the same policy:
I actually think that all basketball staffs, male and female, would benefit from having both men and women on them, but because we’re not included in men’s basketball, I feel a responsibility to help develop women in women’s basketball,” .

what works for her, works for her
that doesn't mean it is across the board
 
#53

Memvol44

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#53
Pretty much, yeah.

I mean, until women get equal opportunity coaching men (which doesn't appear to be changing anytime soon), I just don't see anything wrong with what she said.
Even Summitt turned down the thought of coaching the men's team.... not sure what women are applying and getting turned down to coach mens teams..
 
#54

madtownvol

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#54
So basically what you're saying is two wrongs make a right? What's good for the goose is good for the gander? Gotcha.
Let's go with that goose and gander analogy.

Imagine that we have two fields with food for the geese and the ganders. The largest and best one is only for the ganders; the geese have a smaller field in which to eat. However, there is a catch to this distribution of resources. The geese are not allowed to come into the gander field but the ganders can eat all they want in the goose field. (Sometimes they come over because they don't want to fight the other ganders for their designated food supply). Frustrated by this status quo, some mama geese want to make sure that their daughters get fed and so they fight to protect their small patch of land. In the end, the ganders are still over the geese field but their a few places where some powerful mama geese (McGraw and Van de Veer) try to protect their food supply for their daughters.
 
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#56

Brave Volunteer

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#56
Even Summitt turned down the thought of coaching the men's team.... not sure what women are applying and getting turned down to coach mens teams..
It also seems like an admission that male sports are better. If women claim to be so "yay, girl power" then why are they in such a rush to abandon coaching the very sports that girls play in?
 
#57

Memvol44

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#57
The hypocrisy is hilarious.

“Let a man say this about a woman.” Ummm they don’t have to. Which is literally the whole point. That it’s understood that women don’t and won’t grt the opportunity to coach in men’s sports.

Y’all are just mad that Muffet has more balls than most men’s basketball coaches and isn’t afraid of saying something that might hurt the egos of the men she is talking about. I bet y’all got triggered over the Gillette commercial, too. 😂😂
No, what was hilarious was after she realized what came out of her mouth she couldn't backpedal fast enough!@@
 
#58
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#58
Let's go with that goose and gander analogy.

Imagine that we have two fields with food for the goose and the gander. The largest and best on is only for the ganders; the geese have a smaller field to eat and but there is a catch. The geese are not allowed to come into the gander field but the ganders can eat all they want in the goose field. (Sometimes they come over because they don't want to fight the other ganders for their designated food supply. However, some mama geese want to make sure that their daughters get fed and so they fight to protect their small patch of land. In the end, the ganders are still over the geese field but their a few places where some geese (McGraw and Van de Veer) try to protect their food supply for their daughters.
I have goosebumps
errr
ganderbumps?
 
#59

madtownvol

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#59
Even Summitt turned down the thought of coaching the men's team.... not sure what women are applying and getting turned down to coach mens teams..
Here is what CPS said about the opportunity to coach a then flailing UT men's program:

“I think women should help women,” she said.
A good reason, but there was a better one.
“I wouldn’t want people to think I looked at the men’s game as a step up.”

Whicker: Pat Summitt had chances to coach men at Tennessee; any doubt she would have won? – Orange County Register


And let's not forget that CPS was Naismith coach of the century. So yeah, any woman who is named Naismith coach of the century might get considered for a men's slot at her home institution where the administrators admitted that they were in a desperate situation.

Gender inequality solved!
 
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#60

plumbervol

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#60
I wonder if this discussion is about hiring a basketball coach that can return LVBB to greatness or is this argument a vehicle for some to push an agenda about reverse discrimination ?
 
#62

Aerie Vol

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#62
Let's go with that goose and gander analogy.

Imagine that we have two fields with food for the geese and the ganders. The largest and best one is only for the ganders; the geese have a smaller field in which to eat. However, there is a catch to this distribution of resources. The geese are not allowed to come into the gander field but the ganders can eat all they want in the goose field. (Sometimes they come over because they don't want to fight the other ganders for their designated food supply). Frustrated by this status quo, some mama geese want to make sure that their daughters get fed and so they fight to protect their small patch of land. In the end, the ganders are still over the geese field but their a few places where some powerful mama geese (McGraw and Van de Veer) try to protect their food supply for their daughters.
Your analogy presupposes the geese are entitled to the same amount and quality of food as the ganders. Admission to the food table that is the field you imagine is not guaranteed. I, for example, would not qualify to enter either (men's or women's college basketball coaching) field and partake.

Further disclosure: I very publicly lobbied for Pat Summit to PLEASE come rescue the Vols men's program from the mediocrity in which it was mired. I would have been proud to have had her as our men's coach. She is an outlier indeed, and earned a wide open grazing spot in the gander's field. Earned being the key word.
 
#64

madtownvol

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#64
Your analogy presupposes the geese are entitled to the same amount and quality of food as the ganders. Admission to the food table that is the field you imagine is not guaranteed. I, for example, would not qualify to enter either (men's or women's college basketball coaching) field and partake.

Further disclosure: I very publicly lobbied for Pat Summit to PLEASE come rescue the Vols men's program from the mediocrity in which it was mired. I would have been proud to have had her as our men's coach. She is an outlier indeed, and earned a wide open grazing spot in the gander's field. Earned being the key word.
No analogy is perfect but this scenario is one where ganders are sheltered from competition in their protected field whereas women, who have a smaller field, are not sheltered and have to fend off male and female competitors for food.

In this context, being a member of the birth family Anatidae would the criteria for admission. In the coaching field, different criteria would be in play. So, the fact that YOU are not qualified has no bearing on other women coaches who have qualifications but would never be considered serious candidates for a coaching job on the men's side.
 
#65

Cockhornleghorn

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#65
She didn't say she's going to stop hiring men. She made that decision a few years ago. She's had an all female coaching staff for quite some time. She has men on her support staff.

Also, absolutely nothing wrong with saying that. Women make up half the population but are severely under-presented in leadership roles, including CEOs, politics, and coaching. She said until women get equal opportunity on the men's side, she will hire only women. And why shouldn't she? It's the same scenario as a black CEO hiring all black people or POC because white people get the most opportunity. And there's nothing wrong with that. It's their prerogative and it's hers, too. Also, she seems to be doing pretty well given her results the last decade or so.

Honestly, who really cares what Mulkey says? Muffet has always been the much classier coach out of the two, and Mulkey has been known to have a pretty high staff turnover, anyway, while Muffet has had the same staff for many years. If she wants to hire men and women good for her, but who really cares what she thinks about someone else's staff?
I'm with you; I have always disliked Mulkey and find her to be quite disingenuous. She reminds me of that woman that overuses butter on her cooking show. They're both phonies.
 
#67

tnburban

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#67
This whole identity politics thing is playing into the hands of the media and politicians. They want us to see differences, be divided, and be polarizing. It's how the media profits, and how politicians try to gain/keep power.

How many people would watch CNN, Fox News, or MSNBC if there wasn't division, racism, or whatever phobe or ism for them to get you outraged about? It's good for their business for the country to be so polarized.
 
#70

NoBackBoard

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#70
Seems like many of you believe women to be physically and/or intellectually inferior, unprofitable (and therefore bad, money is everything afterall) believe they should not coach in the men's game (and in fact with few exceptions women do *not* coach in the men's game)...
Spot on!
 
#71

Vol_from_86

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#71
Dude. I highly recommend you check (pardon the pun) the world of chess. There's a men's and women's world champion for a reason. Female grandmasters can't compete with male grandmasters. Sure, some can beat some, but the best woman in the world has no business on the board with Magnus Carlson. It is a purely intellectual game. Many of these ladies have the same coaches and training the men have.

I echo the poster above who stated "neuroscience taught you no such thing." We are not equal. We should have equal rights and opportunities, but it is a fallacy that men and women are equal in just about any way.

Have at me. I could care less about worms escaping the can I just opened.
Personally I think this is a crock of **** because my wife is waaaay smarter than me. I have no interest in studying the issue further.
 
#72

WVU05UT09

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#72
Nope that is the paraphrase. She was asked if she would hire a male assistant coach on her staff and she said no. And then she elaborated:


Up until seven years ago, McGraw always had one male assistant on her staff. At the time, it felt obligatory: The AAU basketball ranks were filled with male coaches, and the scouting services were run by men. In order to have ready access to that network, McGraw figured that she’d better have a man on her staff.
And for a time, she admits, she found the optics appealing. “I kind of liked the idea that a woman was in charge,” McGraw said. “My team could see that like, I’m the boss. Yeah, he’s working for me.”

Interestingly, in the seven years since McGraw assembled her first all-female coaching staff, Notre Dame has made four Final Four appearances, three national championship games, and last year overcame the loss of four players to season-ending knee injuries to win the national championship game on back-to-back buzzer beaters by Arike Ogunbowale. In this year’s NCAA tournament, her team is once again a No. 1 seed — and slightly favored to repeat as national champions.


Looks like those all women staff have been most qualified for ND.

Tara Van deVeer also has the same policy:
I actually think that all basketball staffs, male and female, would benefit from having both men and women on them, but because we’re not included in men’s basketball, I feel a responsibility to help develop women in women’s basketball,” .
Tara was essentially more eloquent in saying the same thing in a way that didn’t piss off half the population. But I’m biased Tara is much more my cup of tea.

For all the talk about “building up women” Muffet has exemplified some of the worst cliches about women being catty when her team refused to clap for Brianna Stewart when she won POY and then childishly refusing to refer to Asia Durr by name when she thought the award should have gone to Arike.[/QUOTE]
 
#73

sccshortstop

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#73
Tara was essentially more eloquent in saying the same thing in a way that didn’t piss off half the population. But I’m biased Tara is much more my cup of tea.

For all the talk about “building up women” Muffet has exemplified some of the worst cliches about women being catty when her team refused to clap for Brianna Stewart when she won POY and then childishly refusing to refer to Asia Durr by name when she thought the award should have gone to Arike.
[/QUOTE]
Anything Tara saying or doing has no interest to me at all! Most sullen group of femaleishs on one bench as I have ever seen!
 
#74

ffitxela

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#74
Some body please tell this woman, ND head coach .M to stop talking too much.. She's going to talk her self into a mess. According to ND head coach, she's going to stop hiring men. Some thing Is wrong with her. Looks like winning a couple of championships makes her run her mouth. Pat was a high class, and would never say such thing. Even Baylor Kim condemned her comment.
I think she has a point. Men tend to never hire women to coach a man's team.
 
#75

WVU05UT09

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#75
Anything Tara saying or doing has no interest to me at all! Most sullen group of femaleishs on one bench as I have ever seen![/QUOTE]

Maybe but she’s extremely intelligent and not prone to diarrhea of the mouth like Muffet
 

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