Name,Image,and Likeness

#26

Majors

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
702
Likes
991
#26
Now that we have a clean starting point. Just cut the future battle/lawsuits of equal pay.
Tier the payments across the board for all players, all sexes, all races, all religions and any other way to not discriminate.
Only a matter of time before band, cheerleaders and dance jump on board for time and compensation. And why not?
 
#27

cobbwebb0710

Believe the Heup
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
6,371
Likes
8,310
#27
If you’re earning money based on your participation in a sport then it makes you a pro.
I bet the IRS is licking their chops at the thought of handing over hundreds of thousands of dollars to more immature, irresponsible 18 yr olds.
“Wait a minute? You mean I was supposed to pay taxes on this $700k I earned from my Instagram videos?”
Sincerely,
18 year old college athlete

GBO!!
 
#29

golfballs

Mostly Peaceful Poster
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
70,158
Likes
47,743
#29
Yeah sounds like you have more information. Who sets the standard and what is the possibly those standards will be amended?
The English language. The word itself is defined as anyone who plays a sport and doesn’t make any money in that pursuit. The NCAA can change the rules so that it allows athletes who are being compensated w endorsement deals but at that point they’re no longer administering to strictly amateur sports. They can determine what they consider “amateur status” for their own purposes but by definition those athletes aren’t actually amateurs in the traditional sense.
 
#30

golfballs

Mostly Peaceful Poster
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
70,158
Likes
47,743
#30
The NCAA was founded in a time when there wasn’t much money in sports. College was a place mostly for kids to prepare for a life outside of sports. And that is still true for most NCAA sports. But the idea of “student athletes” which was a premise of the NCAA’s mission doesn’t really exist anymore in revenue generating power 5 sports. It’s hard to stick to your mission when the premise has shifted. We’re reaching a nexus where they either have to establish that college Athletics are strictly a place for true student athletes, or they quit being a league for amateurs and become minor leagues. I think there’s too much money in it to go in any direction other than the latter. And it won’t be good for competition. There might be college athletes who are for this just to find out only the very top athletes are making money and then they have to play other teams stacked with them. It exists that way to and extent today because of the weakness/reluctance of the NCAA and many people complain about it. This will just write it into the rule books
 
#31

ABINGDON VOL FAN

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2017
Messages
12,229
Likes
11,510
#31
The English language. The word itself is defined as anyone who plays a sport and doesn’t make any money in that pursuit. The NCAA can change the rules so that it allows athletes who are being compensated w endorsement deals but at that point they’re no longer administering to strictly amateur sports. They can determine what they consider “amateur status” for their own purposes but by definition those athletes aren’t actually amateurs in the traditional sense.
So you are for the most part agreeing with my original post.
 
Likes: Rooster1
#32

madtownvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Messages
2,762
Likes
8,775
#32
I bet the IRS is licking their chops at the thought of handing over hundreds of thousands of dollars to more immature, irresponsible 18 yr olds.
“Wait a minute? You mean I was supposed to pay taxes on this $700k I earned from my Instagram videos?”
Sincerely,
18 year old college athlete

GBO!!
Welcome to the 21st century! Check out rankings of the highest income earners on instagram, tik tok and youtube. Quite a few are teens. Google on Charlie D'Amelio who made 4 million last year on tiktok.

Stay in your lane boomer (spoken by someone who just made Gen X by the slimmest of margins). the kids know all about monetizing social media and its tax implications.
 
#33

GroverCleveland

22nd & 24th POTUS; non-Nobel Prize Winner
Joined
Nov 30, 2017
Messages
1,042
Likes
1,884
#33
They are missing a teachable moment about socialism however. The Georgia law provides that the schools can hold up to 70% of the NIL money and place it into a pool for "equitable" distribution to the other athletes in other sports at the school. Think you want socialism? Will here it is, fork the money you earned over to the girls' softball team.
 
#35

cobbwebb0710

Believe the Heup
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
6,371
Likes
8,310
#35
Welcome to the 21st century! Check out rankings of the highest income earners on instagram, tik tok and youtube. Quite a few are teens. Google on Charlie D'Amelio who made 4 million last year on tiktok.

Stay in your lane boomer (spoken by someone who just made Gen X by the slimmest of margins). the kids know all about monetizing social media and its tax implications.
Yes, I know. My kids watch these idiots on their devices and it makes me sick. Only because I remember all the stupid 💩 I did as a kid and just wish we had iPhones to record it. I’d be rich instead of mingling with you peasants on Volnation.
😎
GBO!!
 
#36

madtownvol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Messages
2,762
Likes
8,775
#36
They are missing a teachable moment about socialism however. The Georgia law provides that the schools can hold up to 70% of the NIL money and place it into a pool for "equitable" distribution to the other athletes in other sports at the school. Think you want socialism? Will here it is, fork the money you earned over to the girls' softball team.

Grover, since you passed on in 1908, I will give you pass for being confused about socialism. The Georgia case is a better example of capitalism and the free market.

First, schools have the option to implement this pooling policy and would hold the funds until after the student athletes graduate; such grads would then be allocated a prorated amount. from the pool So, the charitable interpretation is that GA. is using these funds as a market incentive for students to graduate.

Less charitably, it seems like an opportunity for pooling schools to skim funds off the top for processing fees and to claim the interest they earn on the escrow account and who know what else once they have ostensible control of the funds.

But the free market aspect is that athletes making decisions about where to play would have clear financial disincentives to avoid pooling schools, which in turn would place such schools at a recruiting disadvantage. From an SI story on U of GA:

And at the University of Georgia, the plan is for the student-athletes to keep all of the money they receive despite a provision that would allow for the schools to take up to 75 percent of the endorsement income to redistribute at graduation.

“We have no plans to provide for a pool arrangement,” UGA depute athletic director Will Lawler said, per the Athens Banner-Herald.
Further, Lawler told The Athletic, “UGA student-athletes would not have to wait a year after they leave school to receive NIL compensation.”
The Georgia athletic department’s stance on not “pooling” endorsement money clears up what could have put UGA at a recruiting disadvantage.
 
Last edited:
#37

a vol n tears

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2012
Messages
1,052
Likes
1,017
#37
I figure every state will have it sooner or later. Anything you do that people like and are willing to pay for belongs to you as an individual. There may be some problems caused by it, but your talent and ability to earn off that talent belongs to you and you alone.
Don’t the schools giving you free education, housing, meals, tutors, and other benefits count for anything? How about the coaches that give them the coaching to be able to have that high profile? Should the school and coaches get a % of the athlete’s take? What about athletes not good enough for endorsements. Even in the NFL a player cannot use the logo or clothing of the team or league without a license.
 
#39

Remy

A kick to the cods is my only deterrence.
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
9,299
Likes
9,780
#39
If you're a WR, DB, RB, QB, maybe even a LB under these new laws being in place, you have a chance to make a little scratch while playing college ball. However if you're a special teams guy, OL or DL player you're probably not going to sell a lot of jersies or autographs. It's a team sport, why shouldn't the stars be required to pitch in some of their newfound cash into a team kitty that gets distributed?
 
#40

LargeOrange1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2015
Messages
3,477
Likes
6,852
#40
"Add one more SEC locale to the growing list of states that have passed bills that would allow college athletes to make money off of their name, image and likeness."

This might do wonders for our recruiting...
The law would take effect in the Volunteer State on Jan. 1, 2022.


full article:Tennessee passes NIL bill, joins other SEC states

women sports perspective:
On top of tournament inequities, the NCAA's arcane NIL rules hurt women's basketball players most, too
Thus starts the end of college sports as we know it. Pro Sports have gone to **** because they've turned political. Ohhh well....sure was fun while it lasted.
 
Likes: Volfaninfl2
#41

volman128

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
1,773
Likes
2,606
#41
Don’t the schools giving you free education, housing, meals, tutors, and other benefits count for anything?
You act like the schools aren't the ones benefiting from ticket and merchandise sales. Last I checked, they get that money because people come see the athletes play.

How about the coaches that give them the coaching to be able to have that high profile? Should the school and coaches get a % of the athlete’s take?
The coaches get paid millions of dollars to coach 18-22 year olds and you think they should get extra money because an athlete wants to make money off a jersey? Just like the school benefits from athletes choosing to attend and play for a university, so does a coach. Even moreso in college, because they're recruiting the players that they want to come play for them.
 
Likes: LadyVols_WBK
#42

Majors

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
702
Likes
991
#42
Made this comment a few years ago....Eric Berry and Nick Reviez are not going to compensated the same way. Monica Abbott isn’t getting Peyton Manning money although they are the greatest to do it at their school. Back up QB will get more than the starting SS for the lady Vols or goalie for the soccer team.
 
Likes: krichunaka
#43

Majors

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
702
Likes
991
#43
You act like the schools aren't the ones benefiting from ticket and merchandise sales. Last I checked, they get that money because people come see the athletes play.



The coaches get paid millions of dollars to coach 18-22 year olds and you think they should get extra money because an athlete wants to make money off a jersey? Just like the school benefits from athletes choosing to attend and play for a university, so does a coach. Even moreso in college, because they're recruiting the players that they want to come play for them.
Seems like a good opportunity for players to utilize the opportunity given to them through athletics to maybe be a coach if the NFL route doesn’t workout. Education, Pell Grant, healthcare, food, chance that majority kids who high school play sports will never experience. Rough life when you are given a potential to be debt free with a degree. Some perks are given over time as you leave the school that helped you get to second base while others pay off school debt. My kid will play D1 softball and will leave debt free, she’s well ahead of where mom and I were.
 
Last edited:
#44

golfballs

Mostly Peaceful Poster
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
70,158
Likes
47,743
#44
You act like the schools aren't the ones benefiting from ticket and merchandise sales. Last I checked, they get that money because people come see the athletes play.



The coaches get paid millions of dollars to coach 18-22 year olds and you think they should get extra money because an athlete wants to make money off a jersey? Just like the school benefits from athletes choosing to attend and play for a university, so does a coach. Even moreso in college, because they're recruiting the players that they want to come play for them.
College sports has always been for amateurs and the coaches have always gotten paid. So that’s kind of besides the point.
 
#45

golfballs

Mostly Peaceful Poster
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
70,158
Likes
47,743
#45
The ire over this issue is inappropriately directed toward the NCAA. The truth is the NFL has plenty of money to set up a minor league if they want to and give kids who need the money a place to play after high school. The NCAA was founded and has always maintained a mission to govern amateur collegiate athletics. Why should they be the ones to change and not the NFL?
 
#46

GroverCleveland

22nd & 24th POTUS; non-Nobel Prize Winner
Joined
Nov 30, 2017
Messages
1,042
Likes
1,884
#46
Grover, since you passed on in 1908, I will give you pass for being confused about socialism. The Georgia case is a better example of capitalism and the free market.

First, schools have the option to implement this pooling policy and would hold the funds until after the student athletes graduate; such grads would then be allocated a prorated amount. from the pool So, the charitable interpretation is that GA. is using these funds as a market incentive for students to graduate.

Less charitably, it seems like an opportunity for pooling schools to skim funds off the top for processing fees and to claim the interest they earn on the escrow account and who know what else once they have ostensible control of the funds.

But the free market aspect is that athletes making decisions about where to play would have clear financial disincentives to avoid pooling schools, which in turn would place such schools at a recruiting disadvantage. From an SI story on U of GA:
Well, young whippersnapper, I'll give you a pass for completely missing my point.

I will not get into how badly you missed it because we are precluded from political discussions, thank the Lord and Freak, in this thread.
 
#47

Volfan2012

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2012
Messages
20,337
Likes
18,914
#47
Don’t the schools giving you free education, housing, meals, tutors, and other benefits count for anything? How about the coaches that give them the coaching to be able to have that high profile? Should the school and coaches get a % of the athlete’s take? What about athletes not good enough for endorsements. Even in the NFL a player cannot use the logo or clothing of the team or league without a license.
They give them all that they give them for the schools benefit you don't get any of it if you don't have a talent. What the school gives does not in any way affect the individuals ability to earn elsewhere if someone is willing to pay. So no everything the school provides is payment for the talent that the player posses. Just like a baseball manager or a football coach doesn't get part of the players play for what they do for them same applies to everything that the University and their employees do for the student athlete. It is again payment for their talent which otherwise they would not provide.
 
Last edited:
#49

BearBryant

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
775
Likes
172
#49
"Add one more SEC locale to the growing list of states that have passed bills that would allow college athletes to make money off of their name, image and likeness."

This might do wonders for our recruiting...
The law would take effect in the Volunteer State on Jan. 1, 2022.


full article:Tennessee passes NIL bill, joins other SEC states

women sports perspective:
On top of tournament inequities, the NCAA's arcane NIL rules hurt women's basketball players most, too
This is the next big step into turning College Athletes into professionals. It will complete the destruction of College Football. Now ESPN CBS NBC FOX will determine who gets the top recruits. This is because they will control which schools get the most coverage.
 
#50

stllvf

StlLVF Saw first game in 1976
Joined
Sep 23, 2013
Messages
1,058
Likes
950
#50
What is not included by those with relevant comments is this is driven by attorneys and the relative costs of letigation. The approach is to take every issue to the Courts recognizing legal findings will overrule the NCAA. A recent article I read focused on how professional coaches have "to manage" exceptional athletes with big egos. And that will flow down to the elite players

social media and legal decisions versus amateur sports. betting odds are on the former
 
Likes: krichunaka

VN Store


Sponsors
 

Top