Name,Image,and Likeness

#1

LadyVols_WBK

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#1
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#2

savannahfan

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#2
"Add one more SEC locale to the growing list of states that have passed bills that would allow college athletes to make money off of their name, image and likeness."

This might do wonders for our recruiting...
The law would take effect in the Volunteer State on Jan. 1, 2022.


full article:Tennessee passes NIL bill, joins other SEC states

women sports perspective:
On top of tournament inequities, the NCAA's arcane NIL rules hurt women's basketball players most, too
I don't mind a person making money off of their own abilities: however I expect it will lead to much less "team play" and more ME play. This will be very bad for college/amateur sports. Which brings up another question, does this not (making money) define a person as a pro???
 
#3

golfballs

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I don't mind a person making money off of their own abilities: however I expect it will lead to much less "team play" and more ME play. This will be very bad for college/amateur sports. Which brings up another question, does this not (making money) define a person as a pro???
If you’re earning money based on your participation in a sport then it makes you a pro.
 
#5

savannahfan

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#5
I figure every state will have it sooner or later. Anything you do that people like and are willing to pay for belongs to you as an individual. There may be some problems caused by it, but your talent and ability to earn off that talent belongs to you and you alone.
But will it work in the college "team" amateur environment. I know it does work at the pro level, because everyone is a "pro" and being paid for what they can do. That's because they have made it to this level and understand (for the most part) they need the other pros to help them "sell" themselves. Many college players (in all college sports) know they will not be pros, they play to be part of a team and enjoy the "game'. Not use it as a springboard to their professional life.
 
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#6
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#6
I don't mind a person making money off of their own abilities: however I expect it will lead to much less "team play" and more ME play. This will be very bad for college/amateur sports. Which brings up another question, does this not (making money) define a person as a pro???
agree,,,don't like it and think it will have some bad repercussions.
The elite of the elite will be the ones who benefit, all others will harbor jealousies

OTOH, it will keep the elite athletes from disappearing so much, as it will affect their pockets
 
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#7

Volfan2012

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#7
But will it work in the college "team" amateur environment. I know it does work at the pro level, because everyone is a "pro" and being paid for what they can do. That's because they have made it to this level and understand (for the most part) they need the other pros to help them "sell" themselves. Many college players (in all college sports) know they will not be pros, they play to be part of a team and enjoy the "game'. Not use it as a springboard to their professional life.
Certainly creates problems but I expect it will be passed by every state eventually.
 
#8

GetEmVols

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#8
I don't mind a person making money off of their own abilities: however I expect it will lead to much less "team play" and more ME play. This will be very bad for college/amateur sports. Which brings up another question, does this not (making money) define a person as a pro???
Might keep players from declaring to the draft early since they are struggling for money. (Doubt it but just saying)
 
#9

Amb3096

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#9
I don't mind a person making money off of their own abilities: however I expect it will lead to much less "team play" and more ME play. This will be very bad for college/amateur sports. Which brings up another question, does this not (making money) define a person as a pro???
I don't think it means they are getting a salary. More that if they are going to sell jersey's with a player's name, then the player gets a cut...which I think is only fair.

I do agree with your concern that it will take the focus away from the team and more towards individual performance to create buzz around their brand.
 
#10

Raebo

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#10
According to the article, "NIL laws are expected to change the game in recruiting, pending an NCAA decision on player eligibility in states with NIL laws. Programs will be able to sell endorsement plans tailored to specific players as part of their recruitment pitches."

The above is what I don't like. Now it will be part of the school's (recruiters) job to go out and get the endorsements for the recruits. Sounds like the recruiter is going to spend a lot of time going around talking to businesses about endorsing a recruit, setting up the contracts (endorsement plan), etc..
 
#12

Voltopia

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#12
This will be the end of college sports. Not in a day, not in a week, not even in a month, but college athletics will rot. When you get addicted to the money -- and college athletics has become addicted to money -- you let the people who are giving you the money make the rules. And those people don't care about the sport. They only care about owning it.

Note that I'm not blaming the athletes here, although I think they are on a dangerous precipice with some of this. Mainly the schools and conferences. If you want to hold every last dollar you have to let go of everything else you hold dear. Eh. It was good while it lasted.
 
#14

#1LVLS MAN 4 LIFE

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#14
What vanity I have in me says, "why didn't we have this when I was in college", the maturity in me says, paying athletes directly will be a huge danger in the making. If your going to pay athletes, should you not pay the student in the band, drama, debate team, or anyone who represents the college or university, if we're serious about this. Perhaps what ever income is earned should be put in an escrowed account that only issues a stipend until the student graduates or completes their eligibility. Are we considering the total ramifications of such decisions? You will have to create a format and infrastructure to evaluate athletic, artistic, and professional performance, and attach a monetary value to it, and who will sit on this committee? Will this structure include all students who are not athletes? I get the argument. The athlete says that the college, university, or athletic program is making so much money off of my talents, way more than what this scholarship is worth, so I need to get paid. I need protection and support for injuries that might end my career and change my life. The college/university is saying your getting a world class education on our dime, you should be satisfied. The reality of paying athletes is that you introduce an element of "entitled independence" that serves only to meet the need of securing the check, and not the unity of the team, college, or university. What coach wants to have a conversation about "my raise" or "my check is not right"? The transfer portal will really be what it has become to be, a free agency tool where the athletes will go to the school who pays the most. I hope I'm wrong, but paying athletes will be the most disruptive force in college athletics for the foreseeable future. And yet, as a former athlete, I know something has to be done. If I sound conflicted, I am. The life of the average college athlete is not as glamorous as most fans think it is, and a little extra money for school items, food, washing your clothes, or just taking in a movie can make a big difference in such a structured life.
 
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#15

BruisedOrange

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#15
It's all Facebook and T-shirts...

until UConn offers a course in "Sports Management for Women: How to Become a NIL-ionairre" taught by ESPN's Director of Marketing.
 
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#16

madtownvol

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#16
I don't think it means they are getting a salary. More that if they are going to sell jersey's with a player's name, then the player gets a cut...which I think is only fair.

I do agree with your concern that it will take the focus away from the team and more towards individual performance to create buzz around their brand.
We are down that road already. This provision is primarily relevant to upper tier athletes. EA sports is just not that interested in placing Joe or Jane bench warmer from Unknown St. on their vid game promotions. As it now stands, yop players are already thinking about building their profile for draft attention and sponsorships; everytime a player posts on their instagram feed, they are brand building. This bill just recognizes that at the top level, calling power 5 college sports "amateur" is more myth than reality and that the myth has worked to the disservice of athletes. If a college athlete can make a little extra income selling a T-shirt with his/her image on it, more power to em.
 
#18

Amb3096

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#18
We are down that road already. This provision is primarily relevant to upper tier athletes. EA sports is just not that interested in placing Joe or Jane bench warmer from Unknown St. on their vid game promotions. As it now stands, yop players are already thinking about building their profile for draft attention and sponsorships; everytime a player posts on their instagram feed, they are brand building. This bill just recognizes that at the top level, calling power 5 college sports "amateur" is more myth than reality and that the myth has worked to the disservice of athletes. If a college athlete can make a little extra income selling a T-shirt with his/her image on it, more power to em.
I'm with you. I think that the difference is that it's attaching monetary value to the pride of seeing their face on a video game cover or top selling jersey list. I don't see anything wrong with the players being able to pocket some of the profits that the university makes from their likeness.
 
#19

volman128

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#19
This will be the end of college sports. Not in a day, not in a week, not even in a month, but college athletics will rot. When you get addicted to the money -- and college athletics has become addicted to money -- you let the people who are giving you the money make the rules. And those people don't care about the sport. They only care about owning it.
Greed is the name of the game in this country and has been for a long time, so idk why this would be surprising to anyone.

And when I'm talking about greed in this situation, I'm talking about the greed by the universities and conferences. There's nothing wrong at all with players wanting a share of the profits that are being made off THEIR backs.
 

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