Lady Vols vs Belgium Highlights

#26

LVsinceJV

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#26
After reading all the comments I retract my previous post on this thread and based on these two games I now predict regular season plus tournament SEC championships and no less than a Final Four appearance for these Lady Vols. That is, of course, negated if Sophie Cunningham or Holly Warlick is anywhere in the building during SEC tournament play. Go Lady Vols and go Coach Harper.
My predictions for this season are more optimistic than they were a few months ago, but perhaps more tempered than yours.

2019-2020:
SEC 3rd or 4th
AP Poll 8th-12th
3rd or 4th seed in the tournament, lose in the Sweet 16
We'll beat one of Stanford, UConn, and Notre Dame. Likely Stanford.

2020-2021:
SEC 1st or 2nd
AP Poll 5th-9th
2nd seed in the tournament, Elite Eight appearance, possible Final Four. And I suspect this will be our comfort zone for a while.
We'll beat two, possibly all of Stanford, UConn, and Notre Dame.
 
#27

lvocd

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#27
Oh... I wanted to mention that I thoroughly enjoyed seeing that little hesitation move that Zaay made before driving in for a layup. There’s a heckuva lot of speed on this team, and if the players will spend time (on their own) working on moves like the one Zaay showed off, that will be fantastic.

I really do hope that players will try to make time to improve those aspects of their game that can be improved on their own. There is simply too little official practice time allowed by the NCAA for this staff to have to spend precious minutes working too much on fundamental skills that can be worked on without counting against the official practice times.

Obviously the players have classes and are ALWAYS busy as Lady Vols. I get that. But my hope is that in this upcoming season that our returning players lead the way in making as much time as possible, after hours, to ensure the turnaround from last year’s disappointment. I mean, if it were ME I’d feel the urgency to show the world a dramatic change, and doing that will take extra individual sacrifices.

I sound insane. lol
 
#30

hammer22

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#30
SEC is going to be a dogfight in the coming years.

Mississippi State has no seniors on their team this year, so they will be even stronger, and we won’t lose any major contributors either — so both of us will be extremely strong this season and next. SC will lose Harris and Herbert-Harrigan, but they have that loaded class coming in.

Exciting that we are finally having conversations about us being back at the top again...GO LVs
 
#31

Voltopia

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#31
Considering how many layups the Lady Vols have missed over the past ten years, if these games are layup drills then I'm okay with them being layup drills.
 
#32
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#32
Considering how many layups the Lady Vols have missed over the past ten years, if these games are layup drills then I'm okay with them being layup drills.
Layup drills..
This is where I could have helped.
I create drivers that literally look for someone to run over.
As long as the point of contact happens after the placement of the lift-off foot and after or at the point of lift-off,,,you can knock the crap out of someone and still get rewarded.

Refs learn to watch the contact while watching the feet (a distorted version of peripheral vision)
if the drivers upward lift occurs first, then it is a block

fear of contact is what causes most missed layups
that and
not practicing them at full speed when drilling

to make sure my players are practicing at full speed..
I time my girls without the ball, taking two steps from arc to touching of the bottom of the glass. (example: .7 seconds)
Then I time them on a two step drive from the arc (time stops at ball on glass) (1.1 seconds)Then I break down the mechanics and see where she lost time
-not starting properly
-not pushing the dribble out far enough
-bad ball pick-up in transition
-bad mechanics throughout
-awkward landing style
-leading with the hips instead of the feet
-bad footwork

until she can do them both in the same amount of time

For contact-layups you have to emphasize different mechanics:
-are they scared of getting hurt? or scared of hurting someone else?
-how they are initiating contact
-are they using the contact to benefit their rotation in landing
-are they rolling into their opponent on contact
-do they initiate contact after planting and gathering
-are they going in low, staying low and exploding into high?

It's a heckuva lot more than just practicing them.
You have to practice them right...emphasizing things.
 
#33

Volfan2012

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#33
Were probably gonna see the team commit around 15 to 19 turnovers a game if were playing at the tempo we've been playing at in these two games. Turnovers only matter if you are committing more than the opponent. As long as you are forcing as many as you are committing nothing lost. Plus in these game were putting up an amazing number of shots and think we got 77 rebounds in one of the games. Shot 45 percent in game one and 54 in game two. If we can shoot that well getting 85 to 90 shots up per game because of offensive rebounding and up tempo game gonna put up a big number every game on offense. Hopefully the balanced scoring were getting in these games is something that will happen in the regular season.
 
#34

lvocd

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#34
Layup drills..
This is where I could have helped.
I create drivers that literally look for someone to run over.
As long as the point of contact happens after the placement of the lift-off foot and after or at the point of lift-off,,,you can knock the crap out of someone and still get rewarded.

Refs learn to watch the contact while watching the feet (a distorted version of peripheral vision)
if the drivers upward lift occurs first, then it is a block

fear of contact is what causes most missed layups
that and
not practicing them at full speed when drilling

to make sure my players are practicing at full speed..
I time my girls without the ball, taking two steps from arc to touching of the bottom of the glass. (example: .7 seconds)
Then I time them on a two step drive from the arc (time stops at ball on glass) (1.1 seconds)Then I break down the mechanics and see where she lost time
-not starting properly
-not pushing the dribble out far enough
-bad ball pick-up in transition
-bad mechanics throughout
-awkward landing style
-leading with the hips instead of the feet
-bad footwork

until she can do them both in the same amount of time

For contact-layups you have to emphasize different mechanics:
-are they scared of getting hurt? or scared of hurting someone else?
-how they are initiating contact
-are they using the contact to benefit their rotation in landing
-are they rolling into their opponent on contact
-do they initiate contact after planting and gathering
-are they going in low, staying low and exploding into high?

It's a heckuva lot more than just practicing them.
You have to practice them right...emphasizing things.

This is an excellent approach to teaching the proper way to shoot layups. That said, it seems like it would be way too time consuming to be practical within the ridiculously limited official practice time the NCAA allows. All the stopping and starting to time even ONE athlete over and over, then working closely with that ONE athlete to modify their mechanics -- all the while (I assume) continuing to time their progress -- to the point where they have successfully broken the old bad habit and are consistently using the new technique, would likely take a LOT more time than Kellie will have even for ONE player. If this process were to be applied to the entire team, it seems like it would take a month of 2-hour/day practice allotments to get everyone to the timed optimum.

BUT, maybe I'm wrong. Maybe this isn't something that is, in real time, as tedious and time consuming as it sounds in writing.

Either way, it is incumbent upon each player to try her best to do whatever she can on her own to keep the staff from having to set aside precious time during the official practice time allotment to drill the type of fundamental skills that they could do WITHOUT wasting officially staffed practice time. If they did that, there'd be more time for Kellie to work with them on offenses and defenses.
 
#35
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#35
This is an excellent approach to teaching the proper way to shoot layups. That said, it seems like it would be way too time consuming to be practical within the ridiculously limited official practice time the NCAA allows. All the stopping and starting to time even ONE athlete over and over, then working closely with that ONE athlete to modify their mechanics -- all the while (I assume) continuing to time their progress -- to the point where they have successfully broken the old bad habit and are consistently using the new technique, would likely take a LOT more time than Kellie will have even for ONE player. If this process were to be applied to the entire team, it seems like it would take a month of 2-hour/day practice allotments to get everyone to the timed optimum.

BUT, maybe I'm wrong. Maybe this isn't something that is, in real time, as tedious and time consuming as it sounds in writing.

Either way, it is incumbent upon each player to try her best to do whatever she can on her own to keep the staff from having to set aside precious time during the official practice time allotment to drill the type of fundamental skills that they could do WITHOUT wasting officially staffed practice time. If they did that, there'd be more time for Kellie to work with them on offenses and defenses.

actually it happens quite fast...Since I know what mechanical errors to look for
and have teaching strategies for each phase in the process ...e.g... initial movement, push ahead dribble, cradling on the pick up, full gather at the point of lift off, contact initiated on the lift off, roll into the body as they finish, softening the impact of the ball off of the glass, land in a boxout,,,I can have an athlete at full speed in a couple of weeks.

The contact takes a little longer and I have to have my assistant, Pooh Bear, a 6'3" and 376 lb ex-lineman for Carson Newman. My prodigies have to learn to move mountains before they attack molehills
 

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