Lady Vol Booster Club (the original one) why was it disbanded re NCAA rules

#1

stllvf

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#1
I noted under NIL the name is being used again. When I lived in Knoxville (16 years ago) we were members and went to the events beginning the introduction of the team. We had officers and by-laws etc. Don't remember if it were registered as a non-profit? Obviously it violated some NCAA rules, Just curious what they were ?

thanks,
 
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#2

volnationnj

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#2
I noted under NIL the name is being used again. When I lived in Knoxville (16 years ago) we were members and went to the events beginning the introduction of the team. We had officers and by-laws etc. Don't remember if it were registered as a non-profit? Obviously it violated some NCAA rules, Just curious what they were ?

thanks,
These don't answer your question but I found them helpful:
Rules for boosters
Adobe Acrobat

And What boosters can't do.
What boosters can’t do | Sun Devil Compliance
 
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#3

madtownvol

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#3
I noted under NIL the name is being used again. When I lived in Knoxville (16 years ago) we were members and went to the events beginning the introduction of the team. We had officers and by-laws etc. Don't remember if it were registered as a non-profit? Obviously it violated some NCAA rules, Just curious what they were ?

thanks,
The LV boost-her cub began when women's sports were under the auspices of the AIAW and that organization was pretty lax on rules. Back in those days, it was not uncommon for boosters to buy stuff for their sponsored athlete. My wife was part of that and her boosters bought her some appliances and other items for her dorm room when she came to campus. Birthday gifts, dinners at the sponsor homes etc were all part of the process.

After the NCAA took control of women's sports in 1982 (and it was a contested take-over which the AIAW fought but lost), women's sports fell under a much stricter set of rules and these kind of one-to-one relationships between an athlete and a booster were no longer allowed.
 
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#4

Smallvol#1

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#4
It was a shame it was not allowed. We were in it from 1986 until it 'disappeared'. I never knew of any gifts etc. in that time frame, but the girls were frequently invited to dinners in the homes, especially holidays. Some girls literally did not have the means to go home and were stuck on campus with very little, for example, on Thanksgiving Day the restaurants were all closed. Hugh and Louise Wallace especially 'mothered' the girls. The other thing I remember is the 'receptions' after home games. Nothing fancy; people just brought food in and the girls came, frequently packed in ice. Bridgette showed me her hand, Daedra made over our daughter (her 'pet' from her Prop 48 year), that sort of stuff. They were great role models for our girl and special girls to us. I miss that connection and truly think it was in the girls' best interests to have that fan closeness when they were so young and away from home.
 
#5

savannahfan

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#5
and now,, they'll come for a fee..........
Not saying I am right but as things are now "policed" by the NCAA and MONEY, this could be the case and likely will in some cases.
 
#6

lvocd

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#6
and now,, they'll come for a fee..........
Not saying I am right but as things are now "policed" by the NCAA and MONEY, this could be the case and likely will in some cases.
One thing I like about athletes now having a way to get a little spending money is that it will make the campus lives more fun for everyone and not just for the kids whose parents are financially able to give their daughters that spending money.

Over the years there have been many, many Lady Vols from financially stressed families who, because of the high demands on their time being on the team placed on them, couldn't get jobs to give them any money to join in with others to go out to eat or to a movie or buy a cute outfit now and then. Their only meals were taken at the training table, and even those were monitored due to NCAA regulations. (Anyone remember when Pat self-reported after she found out one of the food staff members was feeling sorry for one of our Lady Vols and giving her an extra helping of potatoes, which is against the rules?)

None of the NIL deals are likely to net much money for anyone, but hopefully enough to give everyone enough pocket money so that noone has to shrink back when one of their friends or teammates suggests everyone go grab a burrito. I guess I like the idea that none of our girls will have to reply with, "I guess I'll stay on back here. I have some reading to do, anyway. Y'all go have fun!" -- when in truth they really, really wanted to go.

I know for a fact this happens.
 
#7

37620VOL

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#7
Are the training table rules still like that? I would have assumed that each player received a semi-custom diet as suggested by the training staff & nutritionist.
 
#8

DeerPark12

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#8
I noted under NIL the name is being used again. When I lived in Knoxville (16 years ago) we were members and went to the events beginning the introduction of the team. We had officers and by-laws etc. Don't remember if it were registered as a non-profit? Obviously it violated some NCAA rules, Just curious what they were ?

thanks,
It didn’t violate any rules, it was just folded into the Tennessee fund when the development offices were consolidated ahead of the consolidation of the department as a whole.
 
#10

lvocd

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#10
Are the training table rules still like that? I would have assumed that each player received a semi-custom diet as suggested by the training staff & nutritionist.
I don't know the answer to that, but I can't imagine how custom diet plans could be implemented given the number of athletes fed a couple of times every day, along with the ever-changing schedules. Maybe I'm just overcomplicating the process in my mind, I don't know.I mean, it would be great if they did have individualized meals.

It does make me wonder what the training table situation is these days. I wish someone would do a story on it.
 
#11

37620VOL

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#11
I don't know the answer to that, but I can't imagine how custom diet plans could be implemented given the number of athletes fed a couple of times every day, along with the ever-changing schedules. Maybe I'm just overcomplicating the process in my mind, I don't know.I mean, it would be great if they did have individualized meals.

It does make me wonder what the training table situation is these days. I wish someone would do a story on it.
That's why I said semi-custom. I've always pictured it like the training staff gives each athlete a plan: 'x' grams of protein, carbs, fat, total calories, etc. Seems like it would be easy enough to match that plan with the food items available on any given day and modify the plan as needed. Given, this puts a significant amount of responsibility on the athlete to follow through. If this isn't happening then I'm not sure what Amanda Fernandez, the team nutritionist, is paid to do. Seems like it would be her full time job to source ingredients, create plans, and track implementation. I agree it would be nice to see a story on this topic.
 
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#13

DeerPark12

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#13
I don't know the answer to that, but I can't imagine how custom diet plans could be implemented given the number of athletes fed a couple of times every day, along with the ever-changing schedules. Maybe I'm just overcomplicating the process in my mind, I don't know.I mean, it would be great if they did have individualized meals.

It does make me wonder what the training table situation is these days. I wish someone would do a story on it.
The school can provide unlimited meals and snacks at any time. They don’t do customized meals for each person unless they are doing a specific weight gain plan. That’s typically only for football players, most other athletes are trying to actively gain weight like that. They do have custom smoothies made by the nutritionist at the smoothie bar. Those are typically for post workout, but they also have snack packs delivered for post practice and road trips, depending on the situation.
 
#14

Jax_Vol

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#14
The school can provide unlimited meals and snacks at any time. They don’t do customized meals for each person unless they are doing a specific weight gain plan. That’s typically only for football players, most other athletes are trying to actively gain weight like that. They do have custom smoothies made by the nutritionist at the smoothie bar. Those are typically for post workout, but they also have snack packs delivered for post practice and road trips, depending on the situation.
Unsure if it is all tied together, but over last couple of years...we appear to be stronger and more powerful. I like the looks of both basketball teams, softball, baseball, etc. Haven't noticed that type of change with football, but it may be there.
 
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#15

savannahfan

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#15
One thing I like about athletes now having a way to get a little spending money is that it will make the campus lives more fun for everyone and not just for the kids whose parents are financially able to give their daughters that spending money.

Over the years there have been many, many Lady Vols from financially stressed families who, because of the high demands on their time being on the team placed on them, couldn't get jobs to give them any money to join in with others to go out to eat or to a movie or buy a cute outfit now and then. Their only meals were taken at the training table, and even those were monitored due to NCAA regulations. (Anyone remember when Pat self-reported after she found out one of the food staff members was feeling sorry for one of our Lady Vols and giving her an extra helping of potatoes, which is against the rules?)

None of the NIL deals are likely to net much money for anyone, but hopefully enough to give everyone enough pocket money so that noone has to shrink back when one of their friends or teammates suggests everyone go grab a burrito. I guess I like the idea that none of our girls will have to reply with, "I guess I'll stay on back here. I have some reading to do, anyway. Y'all go have fun!" -- when in truth they really, really wanted to go.

I know for a fact this happens.
I think you misunderstand me. I am not opposed to the money game. Just wonder what effects it is going to bring other than on the court.
 
#16

lvocd

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#16
I think you misunderstand me. I am not opposed to the money game. Just wonder what effects it is going to bring other than on the court.
Just so you know, I wasn't replying particularly to you, but with general thoughts. I doubt anyone here would want to deny these kids the opportunity to make a few bucks here and there, but I also think most here would also agree that the money game is likely to not be played fairly, or legally, by everyone.

I just don't think we have much to worry about for women's sports. There are only a handful of young women in the entire country, encompassing every sport, who might ever be involved in any big-money scenarios.
 
#17

savannahfan

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#17
Just so you know, I wasn't replying particularly to you, but with general thoughts. I doubt anyone here would want to deny these kids the opportunity to make a few bucks here and there, but I also think most here would also agree that the money game is likely to not be played fairly, or legally, by everyone.

I just don't think we have much to worry about for women's sports. There are only a handful of young women in the entire country, encompassing every sport, who might ever be involved in any big-money scenarios.
Well you must define "big money". To me there are two or three levels of "money" in this scenario. FIRST 50-100 thousand. Second 100-300 only a few really good ones make this level. Three 300 and up a very few will get to this level. I just wonder if a player starts at level one and by the time they have been around forever, as some are no being allowed to do, can they reach the third level. (like the pros they are and improve as their careers advance over time)
Bye the way, I think as things are progressing in women's sports, with better athletes, much better media coverage, there will be some reaching pretty far up in my level three money.
 

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